Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 1 month ago

Adam Greenberg | Average to Savage EP139

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and thirty-ninth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring former MLB player Adam Greenberg. Paul Guarino talked with Adam Greenberg discussing his journey to the majors, what he learned along the way, and his new roles as a baseball analyst & rep for Chandler Bats.

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This podcast interview with Adam Greenberg was originally recorded on September 9, 2021

...this is the average to Savage podcastwith paul Guerrino. Everyone in anyone athletes celebs andmuch more today's episode is brought to you by busr dot com. You know, everyone always asks me where they should bet and now Igot a solution for them, the U. S. R. Dot com slash paul. You deposit 100dollars, they'll match your $100 in free bets. So you basically get $200.Go check it out, be USr dot com slash paul. So everybody, I'm back foranother episode of the Average Savage podcast. Our special guest today isAdam Greenberg, Adam. How's it going? Doing awesome man, How you doing? Goodto see you haven't talked to in a minute, Good to see you too appreciateyou coming on, let's just go, let's just go back in time. When was thefirst time you remember just like playing baseball? 0 1st Time Remember Playing Baseballlike five or six years old. I had a glove that was like this big, theycalled me hoover hoover, the vacuum cleaner because I wanted to be like donMattingly playing first base and I was like this big but man, I just littleleague fields and that was that was it, it was just it was just awesome. Yeah.Now growing up in Connecticut obviously you know I'm from Connecticut who uhwell what was it like just the baseball atmosphere and just like you're justupbringing baseball atmosphere wasn't very good, I'm not going to support it.I mean Northeast, it was it's soccer, it's basketball, football. Baseball wasnot really a huge to do literally, you know it was it was kind of something,but at least in Guilford where I grew up The time people got to 7th and 8thgrade there started looking across and be like yeah this is more fun. Um but Imean it was just something that I was drawn to. I grew up watching majorleague baseball and that I could see myself playing and I just wanted to Iwanted to be a part of it, so I loved it. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. And whatabout like when did, when did you know you were like kind of like better thanthe rest? Uh I would say on a certain level itwas when I was 13 years old um you know, I played baseball, basketball, soccergrowing up, so I was always one of the better kids, you know on on all of myteams, but it's one thing to be good locally and it's another thing to begood and to see what else is out there, right? Um and travel balls differentnowadays than it once was, right. Um So I went to I was on the firstConnecticut au team, which sounds crazy because there's one by 1994 was thefirst Connecticut au team and made the team. So I was one of the guys in thestate, right? So now I'm like okay I'm one of the best guys in the state andthen we went off to the national championship in Des Moines Iowa fieldof dreams and We won when I don't know if it was 11 and or whatever 12 andalso won the National Championship and I made the all tournament team to mewhether it was right or wrong, I kind of started thinking of myself of man,I'm one of the best in the country, right? And I'm I made the alternativeteam against all these, all these guys. Uh maybe it was just a little bit of,You know, pat myself on the back and kind of, I always wanted to be a majorleaguer. So now I'm starting to convince my mind that I can compete atthat level, but it was, it was 13 years old that that summer was like I'm goingfor it. Yeah, I mean that's crazy. Just like every, you know, interviewobviously a lot of athletes stuff is just like so crazy to me when likepeople say like that young they knew something was like, It's just like, Idon't know, it's like created to me because when I was 13 I was probablyjust like not thinking like that that's on like not even like that mental, likementally that's like crazy to me. Well,...

I mean it's with sports, right? We'rewatching it as young as we are. So you know, you see something and then youeither want to be like that or want to be a part of it. I mean music. It's allthe same, right? You aspire to be something that you're watching and whenyou're young. So if you're put in that environment and you want to be thereand then that's just how for me at least that's how it stacked up. So, youknow. Yeah, for sure. Yeah, I know you're a multi, multi sport athlete.Like you mentioned uh, what, what was your recruiting process like out ofhigh school? Uh, I got more looks when I was younger,like in the early stages of high school for soccer. Um, and then baseball, Iwent to a couple different showcases, uh, team one at area code games back inthe day, which was like the ones now, once again it's like perfect game this,that like this, you can go to a showcase every other weekend. Um,that's like the biggest and the best and everyone is bigger and better. So Idid those two showcases in them when I, when I got home from those, uh, therecruiting period open and I'll never forget. It was, I think it was six a.m.The day that the recruiting period open meaning the coaches were allowed tocontact the player. Um, and Yale was the first school, the car, six a.m. Myphone rang, I'm like, man, this is cool. And then the whole day it was just likecall after call after call and I had all, you know, a bunch of letters thatI received and I stored all of the letters I put him in uh you know, thisbig folder and I still have it somewhere. But it was it was the mostexciting time in my life because I didn't know exactly which school Iwanted to play at. I just knew I wanted to play at the best schoolsacademically and athletically as I could where being from Connecticut,nobody cared about baseball. You know, I could have gone and at the time I'mnot downplaying Northeast schools by any means at the time, they weren't atthe level they're at today. So I had to, my opinion go down to down south or outwest to a baseball school. Because if I play well, there there's less questionsthan, you know, you just you're doing well up in Connecticut, you know what Imean? Yeah, for sure. Was there, so was there any chance that you were going toplay soccer in college or No? Are you sure? Sound basement okay in therecruiting process? No, I I shut everyone down right into being, I'mlike, I'm playing baseball, I'm playing baseball. And then when I went to U. N.C. I got hurt after my freshman year and I went in during the fall of thesoccer coach had asked me to play soccer and I went into the coach'soffice coach Fox, and I said, hey, you know, I can't really do anything, myhand is in a cast. Um would you be ok if I played soccer for the fall just tobe active, Right? And he goes, yeah, shut the door on your way out. So uhthat didn't go over too well in that year. Unc Chapel Hill won the nationalchampionship for soccer. Thanks. That's that's crazy. So I missed it orwhatever. I don't know if it's I mean, nowadays,I mean, I've seen, you know, you've seen kind of more players playdifferent, obviously they're in the same season, but are you are, you know,no soccer soccer in the fall. Yeah, yeah. So yeah, so, I mean, you've seenit like nowadays, like other play a lot of football players, kind of, not a lotof, but football players usually kind of played baseball in college, like Icould think like Jameis, Winston and Russell Wilson and things like that,that that the teams let them play in multiple sports um During the college,that would've been cool. The big difference was those guys did it cominginto school, Right? So they recruited...

...two ways. I wasn't. So when I becamewe'll call property of the baseball team, which is like, now, wait, youwere the rookie of the year, you almost hit 400, you led the team in Blah BlahBlah and I'm gonna let you go play uh that was his logic, don't you? Yeah,for sure. Now going back to picking you and see what what were you like uh likeyour final three schools. So it was actually cal Berkeley um wasone Nebraska was another U. N. C. Just trying to think of. So my officialbusiness for Arizona state cal Berkeley uh Nebraska, U. N. C. And then my fifthone, I was possibly going to go take a trip down to Wake Forest, notnecessarily as an official but as an unofficial. Um But I wanted as muchvariety as I could. I didn't want a bunch of schools in a specific area andbe like, all right, that's the one. So in the demographics you look it's likewest southwest California and New England schools. I kind of knew onceagain I wasn't really gonna gonna look there. Um And then and then chapel Hillcame up and I really didn't know enough about the school and after those otherthree visits and a couple of officials other places I went down there, walkedon campus, met some of the guys and I was like this is this is the place. Imean it just it felt more like home. It was like forget closer proximity, butit just felt like I could I could be a big part of that program. Yeah, forsure. Yeah. Now you had a great career there. Um What was your experience liketheir on and off the field. Uh It was awesome. I mean it was primarily I wasthere um my major was baseball, my minor was baseball and I attended classjust like, and I don't I don't hide from it at all. I had one goal andobjective and that was to play major league baseball. I did well at school.It was a challenging school. I'll say that um you know, the courses weretough, the teachers didn't care at least the teachers that I had right, wedidn't get the answers to stuff like we had to work and it was, it was a grindbut that's I mean that's good. You know, doing multiple things and making sureyou hold your responsibilities and also keep your focus where it needs to bekind of two fold because I was a student athlete right? Um but it wasgreat. I mean the school was awesome. The people were tremendous. UmObviously sports down there are second to none facilities continue. They weregood when I was there. They got better while I was there and now they'reforget it a whole another whole another world. Um But yeah, I mean I would doit all over again and I would pick it and go there and enjoy my time. Yeah.Yeah, for sure. Now I gotta ask you, did you ever get to meet Michael Jordan? Uh No, never did. Was he like ever oncampus? What's that? No, I was saying like was he ever on campus while youwere there? You don't know. Uh, he opened 23, the restaurant down there onFranklin Street. So I heard he was there at different times, but I never,I never crossed paths with him. Gotcha. And then yeah, just like your team ingeneral, like you and see you guys had, I think like three or four majorleaguers to make it, I don't know how many draft picks, Probably a ton more.What, what was that like? Just uh, like just be drafted and things like thatwith your teammates. Um, It was, it was awesome because we all share once youget to that level, most of the guys share a similar aspiration right tomake it to the big leagues. So the key for the hard part for a coach, right?You're juggling school juggling...

...personalities, you're juggling who is,you know, prospect or not. Um, so it's a, it's a tough thing, but once againas at any level, the elite start to rise right? Even at that, you know,where everyone is still super talented, but then you start seeing certain guys,like really starts to accelerate. Um, so just being around that environmentfrom day one where I was playing with first round guys and the first myfreshman year, I think we had like nine guys drafted a first round, secondround, third or whatever that whatever it was. So that was now starting to benormal, right? Where in my mind, that's what that's what we're playing with,who I'm playing with, these are my teammates. Um and then I just wanted tobe, I wanted to be a part, I wanted to be one of those guys. So it was it wasinspiring and challenging at the same time because you always have to keep upyour game um and constantly improved because you know, these are the guysthat are going on and if this is kind of some of the best of the best, youbetter pick it up. So it was it was it was awesome. Yeah, for sure. And thenwhat about what, like your decision to leave after junior year, was that likea hard decision or like an easy decision for you? Um Yeah, it was initially Easy and thengot hard for about a 1/2 a minute. And what I, what I mean by that is I wasgone, like I said third my junior year as things started to go and I wasplaying well. Um I had a great freshman year, I got hurt, so my sophomore yearwas a little down, but then by my junior year I kind of felt like I puteverything out there from average defense, power numbers, stolen bases onbase. Like I didn't feel like there was anything left that I could do tonecessarily better my draft position. Um and then you lose leverage goingback to school for your senior year. Um But so the only kind of question markfor me was when I got drafted in the 9th round, it wasn't the 1st, 2nd orthird round. So I had to think about that. I was told the cubs weren'twasn't a team that wanted to pick me or I wasn't a good fit for them. So I hadto think about that. Um and then the last thing was I think coach coacheslast plea was, you know, you could break almost every record at U. N. C.Offensively if you come back to school. So I had to think about that. Um, whatthat what I'm saying like those individual selfish things weren't bigenough if he, if I knew that we have a team that was going to uh you knowOmaha for instance that would have been a much more thought out kind of processbecause now I'm weighing is the cup is the best team for me, you know, allthose things and all those uh all those variables like they will become, we'llcall it more impactful but we weren't going Omaha yet right? It wasn't this.Um, but but I'm glad and the reason why I said I don't care about the cubs notliking or wanting something like me, you got 30 teams, you gotta play nomatter what you got to perform. So as long as you give me a jersey glovecleats, no bat and I can go out and play, I had to earn it no matter whereI went? Yeah, yeah, for sure. And then um, yeah, just going to the minorleagues, um, you moved up pretty much like every year that you were playing.Um, what, what was just like, I know even back then it was probably theworst. Just like, you know, I know that there's a lot of things going on withthe minor leagues now and just like the pay and the travel and things like thatin a hotel stay and like what was your experience down there? It was awesomeand horrible at the same time. I mean making $850 a month, five month payscale. I used to explain and like go to...

McDonald's and get a job if you want tomake any money right? It it's your, your in poverty literally living inpoverty with what we were making and there's no time to get another job.There's nothing else you could do. Um, bus rides were terrible. Livingarrangements were terrible, you know, blah blah blah, like not the lap ofluxury that you'd be like, I'm a probe, I'm a pro baseball player. It was awful but amazing because that's what Iwanted to do. So that none of that stuff mattered and played in at all. Itwas playing ball, I'm playing pro ball on, I was just getting that much closerto the big leagues that none of it didn't make a difference. Yeah, forsure. What about, was it, was there like a was it like a weird dynamicbecause like there's some guys that are like instant millionaires that werelike first round or second round picks that were on the team. Like was thatlike a was there like an ego thing or like was it like strange to, you know,be like that playing with people like that? No, I'm not strange. It's justlike, all right, you're we're going and your escalate we're going and you mightpick up the bill or you know, whatever. But I've never strange, it was only thesame thing where I've got to be better than I know what first round is. I knowwhat a first round center fielder looks like in their eyes, I know how he'sperforming, you're my teammate, but I gotta beat you right? And that's the,I'll say that's the strangest dynamic where you're constantly in competitionwith your teammate at any sport at any level, but you have to play togetherand want to win because the winning team gets more attention anyway andyour game gets elevated when other people are doing well. So you know, ifthat I say that's more of a strange dynamic than he got more money than mebecause in life he got more money, this one got more money, this is a biggerhouse, whatever, who cares? Yeah, yeah, definitely. Um And what about tell melike your call up story. So call up store. I went to the fieldand uh we're in Sevierville Tennessee and I went to the field and me and MattMurder walked in and the our names weren't on the lineup card and we bothlooked at each other like what the hell is going on? Coach called us into hisoffice and he was a total D bag like treating us like, you know guys, youwere like, he made up all this nonsense like you were late or whatever you needto yeah, tuck your shirt in or whatever, like the stupidest things and we'relike looking at each other, we're not in the lineup and what, what is thisall about? So we didn't, we didn't play that day. We never made it in the gameeither. And at the end of the game, he called us in the office, he's like, heyguys, I was just kind of messing with you. Um, you're gonna stay behind,we're gonna take a 13 hour bus ride to Jacksonville florida and you're eithergoing to fly to meet us in florida or you're gonna go up to triple A. So man,I looked at each other like, but I see you were not going on the bus, great.Like that was the best part of the whole thing going to triple A wouldhave been great obviously, but so we're watching the game cubs are playing, wehad an early game, cubs are playing Atlanta for a double header uh and Igot a call from my agent who mutually represented me and matt martin, anotheroutfielder and he's like, hey man, root against the cubs harder than you'veever root against the cubs and I'm like I didn't grow up a cubs fan so I don'tcare sure like yeah, I'm playing for the organization but you know, youdon't have allegiance yet, right? It isn't sinking yet. So we're rootingagainst them and a thinning Jeff Francoeur comes up who was young, hewas a rookie at that time, we had just played against him, he got called up,he had a go ahead home run in the eighth and then they closed it out inthe ninth and they swept a doubleheader.

So the cubs were on like eight or ninegame losing streak, matt and I are high five and we're hugging, we don't evenknow what the hell we're excited about. So soon after the game we get a phonecall from the our manager who was driving down to florida and he's likelisten, I just want to let you know uh you're not going to be meeting the teamdown in florida, you're not gonna be busting, you're gonna fly down to Miamiand you're gonna meet the team down in Miami now, they were going toJacksonville and he says Miami and I was like wait what what's in Miami andhe's like you guys are going to the big leagues So that was like 10 that weturned on baseball tonight and Peter Gammons on there talking about Matt andI and it was it was a special special moment because they always talk aboutit this way your teammates you're always fighting against to some degreeby your teammates when somebody gets called up, you're like, yeah, I'm happyfor you. But it's not me right? And anyone that says otherwise they'relying, you're not playing where you're like, oh I'm so much more happy thatyou made it to the big leagues than me right now. That's a lot. So so matt andI got to share that moment together at the same time and be mutually happy foreach other because we're going so that was that was the most special part ofthe thing And that had to be crazy because you guys both play the outfield.No kidding Yeah. Two from double a gone to the big leagues together. Yeah. Andthen what? Yeah, what was it like? Just like even just like your firstexperience just getting like getting to the stadium and like you see in yourlocker and things like that. Priceless. Not not much more to say other than wegot there early stepped on the field, looked out there, you know, no, no fansare there, nobody's out. And it's like we did it like we're here now, go intothe locker room, seeing your name, signing the signing that contract, geta lot of cash for meal money or like this more than I mean, y'all all monthlast month and this is my meal money. You're like this can get fun but moreand more importantly than anything. It was, it's time to go to work. It's timeto take all the work and all the sacrifices everything we went throughand now go out and perform. Yeah. Alright so I gotta tell you, I finallyfinished your book after like three years. So I finally read it. ObviouslyI think a lot of people know about the first at bat and um so after after youget hit and things like that, what like say like take me through that next likeweaker like months. Uh it was very challenging because Ididn't know what was wrong with me. Like I got I had issues right. Myvision was all jacked up. My eyes would shift uncontrollably. I haveexcruciating headaches, couldn't necessarily figure out what was wrong.Um and I was being treated like what's wrong, you know what I mean? Likewhat's wrong with you? So that started away on me because the last thing inthe world that I want is to not be on the field, especially when I'm watchingguys get traded for outfielders coming on like it was it was called traumaticto say the least. Uh jerry hairston started, he went from second base. Hemoved out to center field? And I'm just, I'm watching all this unfold going. Itis my window closing. Like, you know, I'm there, I get hit. I'm like, that'smy thought process. And then when I got sent down ultimately because they'relike, you're not healthy. So you gotta go down. Um, it was really, reallytough, really tough. And then I couldn't quite figure out once againwhat was wrong. So all these issues kept coming back day after day afterday. Um, and it got to the point where I was like, I can't do this anymore.And I literally told the coach and the...

...coaching staff and like I can't, Ican't play. I mean, and we had it out the coach and I, because same coachthat called me up for the manager that called me to wish me luck andcongratulations. I'm going to the big leagues. He thought that, um, I wasmaking it up like making up my symptoms and stuff because I didn't have a castor a neck brace or anything. So it's non visual, I look totally fine. So itweighed on me pretty heavily. Um, and I was wondering as the quality of my lifegoing to ever get back and got to the point where forgot forgetting evenbaseball and that was the first time in my life that I had ever had thatthought? Yeah, yeah, for sure. And then what? like, how was it, like, how longwas it till you got back on the field? Like a year, 21 days. 21 days. 21 days.And that was the problem because you were rushing back to the mine early. Ibasically lied about I'm healthy because I knew I had to be back on thefield. If I'm not playing, then I'm my career going by the wayside. So I satand slept in a neck brace, sitting up for 72 hours to like 72 hours. Symptomfree, you can go back and play. So after, Well whatever, 18 days and thenI do the neck brace thing and I go and I touch my toes and I do a couple ofJogs and I hit a couple balls. I'm like, yeah, I'm good. And they sent me todouble a. Then after my first game, I woke up in the morning, rolled over inbed and all my symptoms came back. So I rushed got off the roster. They took meoff the big league roster. Like it was, it was like, boom, boom, boom, like onething after another. Yeah, yeah, for sure. And then just going into like thefollowing season is like, um, like, I know you, I know you went through likea lot of different tests and things like that. And then like, so what, whendid you feel like yourself again? I say like, what year was it? 2006, 2007? I started feeling reallygood. I was doing the vision training. I started doing vision training withvisual edge performance trainer uh, with the Royals in the spring and thenhad a really good spring. And then for the most part had a very good, it wascalled a rebound year. Power numbers were up, average was certainly up onbase was way up. And so I had, I had a good year. And even in spring trainingBuddy Bell, who is a manager at the time, he pulled me aside and was like,listen, you keep playing like this, you're gonna be in the big leagues withus. So had the Goodyear came back with the Royals and of course, like not soonafter I sign Buddy Bell resigned. So I got a new manager in, in that kind of,it was just one thing after the other over the next few years that werechallenging to say the least. Yeah, for sure. Now I know it wasn't glamorous,but you got to play for the bridge for bluefish, uh, which is a hometown town.Uh, so what was it like just to play just in Connecticut, It was awesome. Imean, uh, for those reasons, like I was a pro playing in Connecticut back homeand I was always so far away from everyone. No one ever really saw me.The unfortunate part is they didn't see me at the level that I was accustomedto playing at. But nonetheless it was, it was a really good experience and itgave me the opportunity just to keep playing whether I was good or bad. Igot to keep playing and keep pursuing my dream. Yeah. And then you got to,when you get to play with your brother like one season. Yeah. Sam Sam got tojoin the team. Uh So that was an amazing experience because we were, youknow, I was so much older than him that never in high school or nothing. So we,we got to play together as...

...professionals. That was great. I got toface Valerio de los santos. The gotta hit me in the head. So I got a hit offhim. I mean there was, there was a lot of cool moments that I got toexperience there. Yeah, for sure. Isn't it crazy that they like tore it downnow? The stadium are they read whatever they do it, there's like a big thingover and stuff. Now I don't even know. So random. Huh? Yeah. And then justtell me about how the campaign started for the one at bat. I believe his namewas matt. That started it. Yeah. Matt Liston called me up in the off seasonof going in 2012 and he's just a baseball fanatic cubs fan knew my story.Um I was watching Field of dreams of his wife and his wife was like, man, Ifeel bad for that moonlight graham guy? And then that's like moonlight grams.Like let me tell you about Adam Greenberg, blah blah blah blah blah. Sohe called the contact that I knew at ESPN and got my number, called me upand was like, hey, I want to do a, I want to transcend sports, I want to getyou back to the big leagues and whatever. And I'm listening to this guy,I'm like whatever, like whatever dude. But what I heard in his voice was thepassion that I talk about all the time. Everything that I do be passionate,good things will happen and just don't quit until you get what you want? Um oryou'll find a new pathway to something else. So that's what he did. I saidbuddy, knock yourself out. I said I'm not playing independent ball anymore,but give me the spring training or whatever. You're no different than anagent, so go do whatever you want to do. Um but I'm not a mockery, don't, don'tmake me out as a mockery. Like I was a big leaguer and I want to get back andplay. So that's how it started and he really changed my life. Mhm Yeah. Likewhen did it, like when did you find out that the marlins, we're gonna give youone at bat And like what? Like how what was the time period? Like, well howmany days was it before that? They were like, so did they tell you like a monthbefore to tell you a couple of days? Yeah, so uh campaign started, Imentioned the offseason going in 2012, like I didn't play that year and I knewthe team, Israel was having a team so I needed to stay in shape and ready justin case that happens. So that, that ended up happening, hadn't come down toflorida. I went and met with my hidden coach for the first time in years sinceI had shoulder surgery, he fixed my swing in two hours. I was back tofeeling like a big leaguer went down to the team, Israel camp made the teamWorld Baseball Classic qualifying tournament. I'm like, if I play well,we win, we go to the classic in March world stage, I played well, I go to ateam right there was, that was how my mind was, was working. So Matt was downthere with the film crew. Last game ended, we lost to spain in thechampionship, which don't even ask, but I went into the clubhouse for the lasttime in my mind, like my career is over and I really, it was a hard kind oftime because at that point I didn't see the pathway to anything And I walkedout of the clubhouse after matt called me 50 times and I'm like, dude, I don'twant to do an interview, I'm not a good mood, but I'll be courteous and, and doone, but you know, I'm just not going to fake it. So his phone rings at 11:30PM on Sunday night and it's David Sampson, the president of Marlins andhe passed me the phone one and he's like, listen, we were there seven yearsago when you got hit, we thought you were okay. Your storycame to our attention, We've sent our scouts, we've been watching everythingthat you've been doing. So like I was being scouted by them at this Worldbaseball Classic And he's like, you were a big with your seven years agoand you're gonna get another shot. You're gonna give him that bat with usOctober two or whatever. So I don't know the exact date if it was a week orwhatever, but it was days that I...

...couldn't say anything to friends orteammates. None. So I went to new york city, went on the Today show with mattLauer sat on the couch. My life changed forever. Yeah, I mean that's, that's,that's crazy. You got to just keep it a huge secret. Obviously that's a bigsecret. Um, and then what? Yeah, what was it like, what is the feeling likejust to get back there and then, um, just getting the battery box again andthen, uh, and then faced the cy young award winner. R a dickey. Yeah. And the knuckleballer to that,right? I mean it was it was magical, it was it was an experience in a day, in amoment that I'll live, it'll live on with me forever. Um you know, puttingon the uniform again, being in a big league clubhouse, being treated like abig leaguer, had some former teammates with the Royals or whoever that stoodup and spoke on my behalf while I was there in the clubhouse. Just that wecall it vouching for me for me to some degree, like he was a big leader, Thisis not a show, this is not like, like billy Crystal getting a bad, this isthis is a guy who is one of us and that's how I was treated and I had todo some stupid dance speedo in front of everyone and like I was raised and andit but it was it was it was great and I got to shag fly balls and like, man,this is home, like I felt I felt alive really? And and I think it was thesixth inning, whatever it was, I went to pinch it and 30,000 people standingovation cheering one at bat, holding up these signs, the ground was shaking andI'm like, I didn't just jump into the batter's box right away, I stepped inlistening, I felt it, I'm like I'm getting out of here, I'm letting itrain, I'm gonna soak it in because I struggled for so many years and I'mlike, if this only last three pitches or one or whatever, I'm gonna enjoy it.So uh, yeah, and then facing I r a dickey cy young award winning led theleague in strikeouts that year, blah, blah blah. I'm like, whatever course.Here we go. Yeah, for sure. Alright then going, going out of baseball, liketell me about your entrepreneurial ventures. I know you started them whileyou were in the minor leagues and things like that. So what and what likemade you do that? Like what made you have like that? I guess intuition tolike start your post career while you were in the minors. Well, I mean, dating back to likechildhood, I had a personal services business. I would clean cars, cleangarages, we do landscaping anything to make some money. Um, since, but when Iwas playing as quickly as things came, as quickly as things went right and Iknew that and just living, I don't want to call it in poverty, but living on ashoestring that much. It sucked. So I always had aspirations for bigger andbetter. Um, so I started getting involved in real estate. I was doingthree foreclosures in certain cities. I would negotiate with the bank. I woulddeal with the homeowner, I would save him from foreclosure and you know, meetpeople who had cash to buy houses. I mean, so that was something that I didand it helped keep me afloat, certainly. Um and then the nutrition business thatI started, it was because I had people that helped me really get back on thefield and get healthy, so I wanted to give back um and that was the birth ofmy nutrition business, and so yeah, I started while I was playing ball inBridgeport in the clubhouse, um but yeah, I mean, I just always had thatentrepreneurial spirit to say, and and and baseball was my passion, and I wasable to learn so much through sports...

...and baseball and just started kind oftransitioning some of my energy and attention um into into some otherentrepreneurial ventures. Yeah, yeah, for sure, and now I know you'redirector of sales for Chandler bats, and then I saw you been doing someanalysts work too, so what is, what has that been like, transitioning kind of,like, it's a new rules, I'd say. Yeah, it was cool because for for 10 years Iwas Kind of out of baseball and it wasn't intentional, it wasn't like Ihad an ill will or anything like that, um I didn't want to get back on the busand travel all over. Um but I knew at some 0.1 will be back around the game,so I built my nutrition business, I sold it after 10 years and Chandlerbats called and an opportunity they were uh actually in bankruptcy at thetime, so they looked at me to help bring them out, um, and did thatsuccessfully and went from director of Sales, the Ceo of Chandler to ESPN A. C.C network Uh analysts, so all out 10 years all back in. Um, it's been great.So yeah, yeah, for sure. What is it? I know you, I know you've been a motivamotivational speaker. So what is it, was it like, what's the difference islike to just go on like tv and be analysts? Uh, it's kind of similar, Imean, at the end of the day, I got to call the game and talk about theintricacies. So it's not grandmother shortstop and he flips it over there.Sure, it's never, it's talking about like what goes into the place, what'sabout to happen, why certain things happen, what you're looking at. I mean,just really analyzing the game itself and having fun in the process becausethe other day we're supposed to be entertainment for the viewerseducational and entertaining. So when I go up and do motivational speaking, Imean, I'm trying to engage and get people interested and excited. So it'sjust taking that same kind of approach and make it where you're talking tosomebody directly and and and bringing them into what you're doing. So I, Igenuinely like that side of it. It's been awesome and connected with theplayers and coaches and doing some interviews and whatnot. It's cool. Yeah,yeah, definitely. And I'm sure you've seen a lot of changes in the A. C. C.Just with like the fields and everything that since you've been thereteams feel like it's different. It's awesome. Um What what advice would yougive to a young athlete or young baseball player loaded question but advice is just ifyou if you want to play at whatever level go for it. Um I understandthere's going to be hurdles and obstacles and plow through them rightand and just never stop never quit. And I mean the book that I wrote get uplike the art of perseverance. Just get up no matter what because the value ofthe lessons that you learned from that or that you take away and the impactthat you have another people. It's it's way bigger than just that moment. So ifyou want something go get it and you know go as far as you can and if youmake it awesome if you don't it's not a fail. As long as you gave it everythingyou got. Yeah for sure. All right. You ready for the last questions of funquestions do it man. All right. What what was your favorite who's yourfavorite player and team growing up Yankees and don Mattingly. That's whythe first baseman and the big hoover love. Mhm. I got you never got to wear23 though right? When I was young. Young. Yeah I wasyoung. Never after 13. I got the number five handed to me because Greenberg wasg fifth in line with alphabetical five. Hank Greenberg, the famous tiger wasfive. So everyone's like oh is that...

...your grandfather? I'm like yeah sure.Well Hank Greenberg was my grandfather just not the hand dreamer. So theywould ask me. Yeah but really like yeah, did you play baseball? Was like yeahthe Hank Greenberg like uh That's funny. What do you like to do in your freetime? Free time? Uh Do I I don't know if Ihave anymore. I got three kids. I know it took me like a month to get you onthere. So yeah, my bag, I don't know, I love my kids, I love spending time withthem playing sports. We do a lot of about fishing, clamming crabbing, berrypicking. I mean anything that's outdoors that involves them and stuffthat I used to do when I was young. It's that's that's what makes me happy.Alright, last one. Did you get any itch to come out of retirement and try toplay for team Israel for the Olympics. Uh Of course yeah. And then they nevercalled, always told him like I said, hey I'll be I'll be a coach and thenthey agreed like I we'll bring you on his coach and then my whole thought wasI'll be a player coach because it might as well. Um it never happened and Imean whatever, I feel physically like I can go play tomorrow but then I alwayssay like yeah but give me about like six months of training to play and thenonly six months to sound like uh my time is my time because I just Iactually just had josh Zedan so we were talking because he came out ofretirement to play for them. I mean you know he's a little tired that long ago.Yeah 33 years, yeah I mean eight years ago or whatever you know and he's apicture. All they do is throw had run you can tell my seven to uh Yeah then Imean it was cool though just to see baseball back in the olympics also justum and like all the U. S. I mean it was cool, it was cool and not cool that thethe MLB didn't let the MLB players go because then we would have one probably.So yeah agreed. But anyways a pleasure having you as always. Uh and could youlet the, could you let the listeners know where they can follow you onsocial media. Yeah, Adam Greenberg 10 on Twitter and Facebook is just AdamGreenberg, you'll find me. I don't know I either got my kids or me. Um and theninstagram I think is the same Adam Greenberg 10 but hit me up, hit paul upcheck out Chandler baths and check me out on ESPN this episode has beenbrought to you by B. Usr dot com. Go check it out to get your free $100 betwhen you deposit a $100 at b. U S R. Dot com slash paul.

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