Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Alex Tuccio | Average To Savage EP62

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the sixty-second episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring entrepreneur Alex Tuccio. Paul Guarino talked with Alex Tuccio discussing his college baseball career at Siena College, his passion for entrepreneurship, and why he started ScoutDay Follow Alex Tuccio https://www.instagram.com/Tuccio

This is the average to savage podcast with ball Greno, everyone in anyone, athletes, Soett's and much more so. Everybody. On back for another episode of the average avage podcast. Our special guests today is Alex Tuccio, founder of Scout Day. Alex, how's it going? Good, Paul, thanks for me. I'll man really appreciate it. I appreciate you coming on for sure. That's a lot. Now let's just jump right into could you give us a brief background about yourself before I ask you some follow up questions? Yeah, absolutely. So my background, I guess my life. You can look at it in two ways. I'm an athlete turned entrepreneur. In terms of my athletic career. Play baseball my entire life up until about three years ago. I want to enter the business world. You know, baseball is my entire life. I did the whole travel ball, you know, took it very seriously coming up. Went to boarding school, prep school, all the hopes of getting a scholarship. So that's really where I form my identity kind of in my childhood and my early days, my high school days, was on the baseball field. Was Fortunate enough to have the opportunity to play d one baseball and ended up committing to Seaton Hall University out of High School. And then from Seaton Hall I ended up transferring to see on a college which did one program up in Albany, New York, and that's basically where I spend three and a half years of my college career. So you know, consider that to be a big chunk of where it spent my time. And while is at Sienna, had the idea for my my current company Scout Day, looking at kind of my troubles and experiences going through the recruiting and the scouting process, despite everything I did do to put my self in a position to be successful. So at Sienna is where I had the idea for Scout Day. was going to continue playing and pursue masters and business at Rollins College following my graduation from Sienna. decided kind of on a gut feeling to forego that and commit to my business full time, literally right out of Siena. So the story goes. You know, we made to the MAC championship game my senior year. We got blown out on championship Sunday by I think was fairfielder Marris. I don't even remember who was. We got our ASS kicked and I don't even remember the score. I'm pretty sure we're down by like fifteen runs. We ran out of pitching, but it was me at the plate for the last out. Struck out on four pitches. I was pinch hitting in that game and does my last at that and twenty four hours later, after, you know, crying at the plate and crying after the game, I was in Boston, where I live now still to this day, and made the move right away and ever since then I've just been heads down and the business life, just making connections and building my business. So it's been a lot of fun. But that's kind of, you know, my background. Like I said, it's kind of two buckets for me. You know, both of the phases of my life are pretty tied together in that way. So that's how we got here today. Definitely want wild way to end it right there. Yeah, I definitely not ideal. I wish...

I had a more epic story, but you know what, maybe there's a good story. It's all about kind of the the failures of my baseball career and what I could have been. Is, you know, what drives me forward, and you know I have my own podcast as well, and I was just talking about this this week actually in Lagoona beach with Ed my let as huge entrepreneur, has a massive podcast as well, also baseball player, and we talked about the same regret. I mean, this guy's worth hundreds of millions of dollars. You know I'm not. I'm in the process of, you know, building my life, resume and my own success, but this guy has it all and it's those moments of failure that really drive us too much bigger things. So well, it's not an epic story like I had a game winning hit or something. You know, maybe that's the way it's supposed to be. Maybe it's that defining moment that will define the rest of my life. So you know, I'm grateful for the way that it ended, to be honest with you. Yeah, for sure. I mean maybe that led to to Scout Day. And Yeah, I always ask athletes like what the recruiting process was like coming out of high school. So I know that's was definitely big for you. So, and I didn't even know actually until now, you went to Seaton Hall. So what was the recruiting process like and like maybe your likes and dislikes? Yeah, it was really tough. I mean, if any athlete says they like the recruiting process, either crazy or one of the top players in the country, because that's really the only way to make it easy on yourself and your family, as if you're either just insane and you love stress and chaos or if you're just that good where you have the school's knocking at her door, and those players do exist across multiple sports. I wasn't one of those players. You know, I personally did not enjoy the creer process. It takes a lot of work. It's a huge financial commitment. That's a huge time commitment. I can only speak to kind of the baseball recream process because that's where I have my experience, but you know, going around all these events, you know, all over the country just to get in front of these coaches, you know it's a huge commitment, not only for the athlete but for the families and the parentss especially as well. You know, they're the ones paying for it. You know the hopes of seeing a return and some sort of opportunity or scholarship or something like that. So it's definitely a tough process, it's complicated and we're it all changed for me was I was getting recruited, you know, two thousand and eleven, two thousand and twelve, which is crazy that that's seven years ago. But you know, at the time I really wasn't gathering much attention despite being, you know, one of the top high school players in New England. I was all New England twice in high school, my sophomore junior year, and yet, you know, here I was my senior year, uncommitted, you know, no real offers that I liked. And we're it all changed for me. was basically I went to the cages one day with a teammate of mine, Patn Zeka, he now plays for the mets, and Tim Tebow's roommate and all the stuff, and Kat and I went down the cages and I was like, I'm going to make a hitting video of my swing and I'm going to put on Youtube and I'm going to send it to these coaches. And it sounds so obvious now but like in two thousand and eleven, two thousand and twelve, like Youtube wasn't really that popular, like the idea of sending a video was not something that was...

...common, and so I just had this gut and tuition that let me to do that. And so it was that video and it's still on Youtube today. It's funny to watch now, but it was that video that you got me in the door Seaton Hall. And even funnier is when I was decided I was going to leave Seaton halland transfer, all I did was make another video and that's what got me to see Enna. So, tying it all together to what I'm doing now in business, like I just I have, I've had this own personal experience where I saw firsthand, like the power of technology and the power of video, and that's what Scout Day is is it's all about, you know, digitizing the recruiting process and a mobile and, you know, in a content, in a data driven way, and so it's all based off of my own experience that I've seen firsthand over the last, I guess, five to seven years. Now. You know, technology has shifted. Everyone has an iphone now, like it wasn't always that way, like it's still relatively new. So just to tie together what my recruiting process was like and the direction that everything's going, like Scout Day is kind of falls into the middle of that. It's funny you say that about the Youtube Video, because I had Daniel Rodriguez on. He went to Clemson. He was in the army before like going back to football, and that's exactly what he did. And that was like even earlier. I think it was maybe two thousand and nine, two thousand and ten. He made the video and then Dab o Sweeney saw it and they got him on the team, stuff like that, and then it's crazy. So it's I mean it's hard videos crazy for us, US guys, you know, mid s now, you know, I think the younger generation, like high school kids now for example, like they've really really grown up with technology, like they've always had the ipattern in their hands. Like for our generation, like we're in an interesting spot because we had technology in our hands. Yeah, but we grew up through like my first cell phone, for example, was like the LG MV, the phone that was like horizontal, you flipping open and then you have to keep board like goes the coolest thing ever, you know, the right orange end phone, and so it's not like we didn't have technology, but what we live through and and especially in the sports side, and like hearing Danny story you just said, and had of my story and thousand other athletes. Is Like we've lived through the transformation of this technology, which I think is a really interesting time frame to live through where, you know, we remember that like an intend to sixty four days and like the game few days and like where it does now at esport. It's just it's fascinating. You know what I mean? Technology is fascinating. So, you know, I enjoy being a part of it. You know, obviously there's a lot of negative sides with social media and stuff like that, but what I try to do is, you know, develop solutions and communities to have a positive impact. Yeah, definitely, and I remember, like, think it was freshman or like high school, I was still using like a floppy disk to like save stuff. How wild is that be ports or whatever. How wild is that as like ten years and ten years that's like it's not. I'm many years in. Yeah, man, but yeah, back in your baseball current stuff. Overall, was your experience like at Siena is quite poor.

I feel homfortable now talking about it, and you follow me on Instagram, you know I've written a little bit about it and you know I've shared my experience through the SCAP Day cown as well, but you know, honestly, it wasn't great. You know, my advice two players is to take more accountability, and that's something that I wish I did, you know, a year or two years out of Siena. You know, all I come up back and say, you know, the coaching staff that this to me. You know, the coaches like me and had to play. But looking back, like what I tell players now is like maybe maybe we just need to look, you know, in the mirror as athletes and as people and when things aren't going our way, just take accountability and just be like, well, maybe we're not good enough, like maybe our talent isn't as good as we think it is and we're just not deserving of the opportunity that we're fighting for and, you know, shedding blamed for. And so I was just one of those players and I think there's, you know, thousands, if not millions of athletes across all sports who struggle with the idea of, you know, politics or, you know, coaches not liking that what ever might be like. There's a lot of excuses and stories that we tell ourselves as athletes if things aren't going well. You know, things are going great, obviously it's easy to just keep it rolling and you know you're in the lineup every day and stuff, but I wasn't one of those players and that was hard for me coming out of high school, you know, being a key part of, you know, one of the top twenty five high school programs in the country, transitioning to basically a role player at Sienna. I feel like my abilities were better than I was, you know, given an opportunity to show but what I should have done differently is I should have stepped up my game to meet the challenge and really earn the opportunity. I think I struggled with a sense of entitlement and stuff like that. And, you know, the narrative has shifted for me. The narrative I taught myself has shifted from looking at that experience to where I am today in business, and I look at everything I've been through as just one big lesson, where maybe my baseball career was simply in my life, you know, for twenty one years to set the foundation for my career and business. Like I really feel like business is what I was born to do. You know, I come from a family of entrepreneurs, like I believe, and things like the fact that it's in my blood, like I believe in like the DNA aspect and and things like that, and so that's what I look at, you know, my career at Sienna and just like the overall when I look back on my career is, you know, there are a lot of challenges, you know, a lot of things that I went through, and it's those challenges that hold me accountable now as a businessman and an entrepreneur, and so that that's how I look back out. It is like maybe it was just, especially the sport of baseball me, a game of failure and everything, you know baseball players go through. That's kind of how I look at it now, is just setting the foundation and there's definitely adversity that I went through throughout my career, especially towards the end, that, you know, created a sense of an accountability that I didn't have before. So I'm grateful for that definitely. And I think I saw the other day, maybe it was a meme...

...or just like the status or something, and it was like don't go for the school for like the bumper stick, or go pick it based on if you're going to play or not, something like that. I'm a huge fan of that. That's actually one of the things that I've, you know, put out there. Think I saw it on you might have posted it, maybe. Yeah, yeah, I have posted that. It's funny because that's kind of what I did. You know what I mean, and that's why I post it is it's something. I know, the feeling that these athletes have and the parents have of you know, you see cars driving around, especially in suburban areas, the big SEV's, like I know, your connetiquet guy like me, drive round care pit of county and it's all about you know what, what bumper stick do you have under Chevy suburban or your range over? You know what I mean, like that's the area that I grew up and the you know, looking at what these parents want their kids and the pressure of these kids are under. You know, you shouldn't be doing it for what's on the back of the car. You should be doing it for, you know, the stories that you're gonna be able to tell ten, twenty, fifty years down the road about your experience. You know, you got thing about that stuff and it's it's hard to wrap our heads around something like that. With the decision as big as you know, you can only really go to college once for the most part. Ye, so, you know, unless you transfer something like I did, you know, it's a big decision. So yeah, especially for an athlete than your clock is tick into with the play four years over five years or whatever it is, example. And Yep, a hundred percent. So all this, I'm assuming, happens for a reason. And then that's how, pretty much, you figured out the way to create the scout day APP so how did you think about at the beginning? And, like was IT development process like? So, how do I think about at the beginning? To me, it felt like, I no brainer, like just thinking about the logical way that the recruiting process works. It's very much like social media. It's all about how much attention you can gather, and so to me, the idea of having a digital platform that's basically community, that has a critical mass of players and a critical mass of coaches existing in a mobile, native environment just made total sense. It's how, you know, the showcases and the baseball industry that charge, you know, hundreds of thousands of dollars for a weekend of games and workouts just to get that coaches attention. Like it's the same business model, just in a different medium. You know, in our advantage as being a tech platform is a few things. One it's the cost, like if you don't need to charge a hundred dollars or five hundred thousand dollars, it can be very expensive for the players, it can be free for the coaches. And then we also don't have to deal with things like, you know, we need to rent a field or we need to deal with the weather, or we need to, you know, schedule time where all the coaches are available to, you know, come to a showcase event. So there's just a lot of flexibility and advantages to being a tech platform. So that's how I thought of it. was I just kind of reverse engineered the logic of the recurring process and like how can I apply what's worked and proven in other business models and a tech and, you know, Native Mobile Environment?...

So that's really how I thought about it. In terms of the actual development, that's probably the hardest part. You know, are strong suit at Scout Day and kind of my strong to as an entrepreneur is definitely on the digital side, you know, the branding side. We have a hundred six thousand followers now and instagram and that's really what's kept US alive. You know, we've encountered a lot of challenges with the APP development it self and, you know, for people to listen to this who have an APP idea, which there's a lot of people have APP ideas, you know, it's easier said than done. You know, can provide you know, kind of my instagram. If anyone ever listens to this and wants to reach out and needs advice in terms of, you know, going after an APP idea and actually executing it, happy to provide my info so people have someone in their corner to get some advice. Because for me, I was just grinding man like. I just wanted to make a work and it was almost my drive and desire to make it work where I definitely skipped a few steps in terms of due diligence throughout the APP process, and that's where I've made a lot of my mistakes, to be honest with you. And Business is working with the wrong people or the wrong groups on the APP side and it burns you because it's not something you understand if you don't know how to Code, you know. So, yeah, it's definitely tough process, but I'm happy to, you know, hopefully use this podcast as an avenue to reach, you know, one or two or several people who have APP ideas who need the hell up. You know, sure, I think probably create an APP is probably one of the most part of things in the technology world right now and it's definitely a huge up sign. I think that's why good like it and I think it's also, you know, we use our phones every day for hours, an hour or so, like APPs are something that are easily understood now, but it's definitely what you don't appreciate as just a casual user of these platforms like instagram and stuff, is like what goes into it to make them work the way to do. It's really not that easy, you know, and that's something that I didn't really account for getting into the business, but it's something now, two and a half years later, that I definitely do understand. So yeah, for sure. Can you give me like a brief summary on it, explaining like how the Scout Day APP works? Yeah, absolutely. So, basically it's a video based APP. We have fifteenzero players so far as sign up for the APP, six hundred fifty colleges and basically, as a player, if your player listening to this or a parent of a player. You sign up with your email. It's really easy, pre using a password, put in all your basic information, your position, graduation here, all that stuff. You submit your video and that's pretty much it. Like the sign a process, is very simple to very simple APP. Right now we're working on releasing a second version that will expend it a little bit, but basically, you know, like I explained earlier, it's all about showcasing your video footage in the same way you would showcase your talent, you know, if you're on a physical baseball field. So basically, using the APP, once you create that profile, you can express interest to the schools directly through the APP, you know, using the interface, and then the college coaches on their end can flip through, they can search for players based on specific criteria and then, you know, they can also express their interests and if the interest is mutual, you know, very similar to the tender...

...and bumble model, and then a conversation. Dude, it's funny and I regret. I regret that, like the that's what I have to compare it to. But if you think about the logic of their crew process, it all goes back to the court thesis of how can I build a platform that makes sense? Like, think about recruiting. If I'm a player, I'm not going to go to a school or have a conversation with the coach at the school's on interested me. And as a college coach, I'm not gonna be able to recruit a player if they don't know what my school is, who I am or if they're interested at all. So, like as recruiting platform, why should we allow any other conversation to happen where there's not mutual interest? And it's very similar to dating and like obviously it's an entirely different market. Like the core premise of like how I came up with the idea was like literally came to me in like one day and a friend of mine, Wayne Mazzone, you probably know Wayne. He's a coach at secret heart. I texted him and I was like, Dude, what do you what do you think? I didn't say you'd do want baseball good, but like here's my idea, here's my vision, and he was like I love it, and from there I was like all right, Wayne, Wayne knows a lot of recruiting stuff. You know, he's signed off on, it must be a good idea. And that's how we ultimately pushed into development and that's what took us so long. was basically not to rant too long, but basically we were developing another APP. It was like super, super built out, and I was like I hate this, like I don't know fighting person on the show, but I I was like fucking hate like what I designed like and anyway, I trash that because I was uneasy about pushing into development. But like I had gone so far getting the APP designed and stuff. I was like I have no choice but to design this now. You know what I'm saying. The idea. I remember where I was sitting when I texted Wayne about this. As an Inn Arba Michigan. I was like what do you think of this? And so we just trashed what we worked on for like four or five months. You know, like I probably wasted the first I wouldn't say wasted, but basically the first six to eight months of my business. Like we built a website. You know that no longer exists. You know, we designed an APP that we never even push into development. So there's just a lot of lessons learned. Basically, I guess the way to look at it, you know, the early days of starting a business. You know, you just have to push through those challenges and you know, bring to market a product that makes sense and you know, surround yourself with people, like I did, who know the space extremely well that you're in. You know, like someone like Wayn Mazzoni, who's written books and things like that, and recruiting, and you know three m wib players who invested in my business. So it's you know, it's all about your network as well. That's also key, for sure. I mean just like baseball, I think business is just like game of failures and and I just saw you went to Dominican Republic recently. So tell me about that experience, because it looked like really rope. Yeah, so, so, like I mentioned earlier, you know, Scout Day, we've developed an amazing community. You know, I can't say I didn't think this would ever happen, because I did. I knew what I could do and I knew what I had in mind when I wanted to build this community. I knew that there was big potential, but to have actually have now, you know, a hundred...

...six thousand people organically following us on Instagram is a huge opportunity I'm extremely grateful for but it also comes with a responsibility. And so, basically, terms of the Dominican Republic, I looked at what we built from our community and I was like, you have you look at our content. It's a lot of showcasing player videos and stuff like that. And you know, when the new year hit this year with two thousand and nineteen, I was like, I want to expand on this, like we clearly have something here with our audience. Like how do we leverage this for the good of the game? And so what pop in my mind was I was like, well, there's all these young athletes around the world and we always hear the amazing you know, thirty stories and he's sixty stories when they make it to the big leagues. Like who's WHO's on the ground communicating with these fourteen, sixteen, eighteen year old athletes when they're young and going through the challenges of being a teenager and all the transformation by WHO's telling those stories? And so that's the decision that I made six weeks ago around the New Year, just rethinking kind of the business, like I want to tell the stories that matter in the game and Manuel, who's fourteen year old prospect down there. He's a phenom. He's an amazing short stop. I've no doubt he's going to sign, you know, probably sixteen years old when he's allowed to, you know, with the big league team. But Anyway, I had met him in Jupiter for a tournament in October and he was just a really well spoken kid, like doesn't necessarily be English well, but just pretty well put together. He puts out a lot of content on his social media and I see the fields that he's practicing on stuff and I see like just the resources he has at his disposal are so much different and honestly less than what the American kids have here in the states. And so I wanted to tell our first story and kind of an original content, branded content way down in the Dominican boots on the ground, showing the not just American kids, but we have followers from over the world. You know, one of these prospects in the Dominican the youth prospects, like look what they have to work with and compared to what you have, and then rethink kind of those excuses that you want to tell me about. You know, whatever is going on. So that's really what that was all about. But yeah, we know fortunate to have two content people who I work with now, who are really, really good, really experienced, and we're looking forward to telling more what I call stories that matter, you know, in the game, through our platform. Yeah, I'm sure. I think that was a great idea, especially, like you're just saying this, just to see what they don't have and what we have here. And they make a lot more out of less. Right, a hundred percent. And now I know you also have your podcast to the players impact. So what was the idea behind that? Yeah, so, just briefly, so the players impact is a private group of pro athletes space here in Boston. A hundred thirty or so pro athletes across several sports. All of them are either running their own companies or are actually investing in companies, or a little bit of both, and so I got connected with tracy who runs the players impact. Living here in Boston, offered her my systems. I felt like I had a skill set on the growth side and kind of a marketing,...

...a branding side that could help them. And so just a tip for people, listen to this if you want something an opportunity that feels synergistic with a bigger goal, that you have offered to do it for free. I know Gary v someone who talks about that, and that's actually what I did. I was like, lookout, I'll grind for you, tracy, like I believe in the idea, in the vision of the group, and so that's how I got involved. If you want more information on it, it's the players impactcom is a website, and so one of the ideas that I bought the tracy was I was like, look, we have all these amazing people involved. I think if we create a podcast platform, you know, could be really good for these athletes and other sports business leaders to, you know, showcase their stories and tell their stories of sports, kind of like what we're doing today. What's like tied tie together the journey of being a pro athlete and all that goes into it and tied together to business and what these people are doing now currently, and so that was my pitch to her. Are we started the podcast maybe six weeks ago was the first episode, and it's been amazing and amazing transformation at a very short period of time. You know, I've gone from interviewing some amazing people, but mainly through the TPI group. To now, you know, I've had Steve weatherfords, a super bowl champion, you know now, fitness influencer, amazing guy. Had Him on the episode. Like I mentioned earlier. I just did at my that out in La going a beach at his home, which was an amazing experience. He has the fastest growing business podcasts in the world himself and he's one of the wealthiest people in the world. So that was really cool. And we have a lot of more exciting guests that I can't really talk about now, but you know, definitely working out securing even more people. We're not going to stop now all because, you know, we're getting a lot of good guests. But you know, all these people, like they said, the focus of the podcast is at the sports business podcast and by definition it's quite literally a sports and business podcast because we cover both. You know, I, as the host, try to tie together these stories for the audience and you know, in a way that makes sense, and so it's definitely really exciting opportunity and, as you know, you know one of the benefits of hosting your own podcast is getting the meat and talk to you know, a lot of amazing people directly. That's one of the benefits selfishly as the host, and so that's part of why I want to Tracy and said I want to be the guy to do it. You know, I saw it for it. Personally, I'm an introverted person. I don't know if it's easy to tell, but like public speaking, all that stuff is not something I have a ton of experience with. I'm still learning how to host and ask questions that makes sense and flow and interview in the way that makes sense. And Right now we're just boot drapping it, you know, like even with at my let someone who has his own crew and, you know, millions of views and downloads on his podcast. Like I showed up with an iphone, Tripod man, two Mikes I bought on Amazon. There were twenty each, and we sat with the Pacific Ocean in the background and we were recorded the podcast, like no fancy equipment or mics or anything like that. We're just we're grinding. So it's a lot of fun to cool opportunity. Yeah, I literally just posted the instagram story right before this to show people that you don't need fancy equipment to start a podcast right because it's a...

...great dude and it was fun hanging out with them. And you know, he was he offered to make a whole bunch of Intros, you know, for our show and stuff, and which is really nice about. But he was like look, you got to get better equipment, and I was like Ed, you know, Comeba, like everyone starts somewhere, and he wasn't saying that like in a condescending way. Yeah, just like you know, if you really want to do a good job in the future, it's not that extensive. Is basically what he was saying. He wasn't saying like you guys are joke. Totally understood why we're doing it, but yeah, I mean you hot to start somewhere. So if you're looking to start a podcast, and I'm sure you can speak to this, like you on to grind it out at the beginning, but if you can afford better equipment, it's only going to help. And especially if your goal is on good guests and big and big time guests. You know, people who get presented with a lot of opportunities, you know they're going to be looking for professional quality. So it's important for sure. For sure, are you doing like the video and interview with them, or was it just the podcast or both? Yeah, so we wanted to do video ones previously. So we done eight episodes. I would say. The last few I've been big like Dave Meltzer. He's a big person on instagram. Like we had him on. He's a mentor of mine as well, and like we want to do video dave down the Super Bowl. But like it I'm not working out because like the lighting and like the room that we were in did really work out. But Ed was the first one that we did video with. You know, I was supposed to record in person with Steve Weatherford as well and get video. That the work out. But yeah, I mean I like the video aspects because I know for me personally with podcast, I listen to sometimes I listen on Youtube, sometimes I listen on itunes. It just kind of depends. Like sometimes having the visual aspect is cool. So if I'm going to grow it, you know, I kind of want to be able to meet both audiences. Yeah, definitely. And what are your future plans for this year and Beyond and your health? Yeah, so I'm working on a couple big things I can't really talk about publicly just because of legality of stuff and you know, just I want to play my carts coast close to the chest. But Yeah, man, I have a lot of big plans for this year. It's already been an amazing year. I mean in six weeks, you know, I've met some people I've been trying to meet for years and you know, might think may many more years to meet them, like, you know, Gary v day belts or Ed I. Let you know, like it's just been an amazing six weeks or seven weeks so far in two thousand and nineteen. So I'm super excited for, you know, the rest of the year and beyond and you know, I should be able to share a bunch of things I've been working out for a very long time, hopefully very soon. So Yeah, man, I wish I could give you more information, but a lot of it is just because of the nature business. Can't really talk about it too exactly. Know once it once it happens, all let the world know. But right now it's playing definitely the cards close to the chest, you know. Yeah, sure, and what would you say, like makes you successful with with your journey so far? Well, first of all, I don't want to give the impression I am successful like I faced laws the same channel lunges a lot of entrepreneur space. You know, I I do like to share a lot of stuff on social media. I try to keep it real. I tried to talk about the challenges as well. But that being said, I have been for fortune to have a lot of good opportunities and a lot of good things happen for me and, you know,...

...to be honest with you, I've been thinking about this a lot and I think the one thing is just network man like. It's I think there's there's something when I talk to people, and I don't mean this in an arrogant or cocky way, like I just for some reason, people emotionally connect with what I am saying or doing or what I'm offering, and I don't know how to describe it, but it's all about getting in touch with the right people having those people help you accelerate yourself to your goals, and that's what's happened to me this year. Is especially being involved with something like the players impact, which is so synergistic with something like I'm doing with Scout Day and the sports space. Like it's just open up so many doors so quickly and all I'm doing is volunteering my time when I can for free, and I get to go to all these events, get the hosts podcast, like, honestly, I should be paying for the opportunity that I have, let alone just doing it for free and stuff like that, you know. So I would say you gotta put yourself in a position to be successful by getting in touch with the right people. I do a lot of business development using instagram, DM and Linkedin and I'm not afraid to do the outreach. I'm not afraid to put in the time, in the effort to get in touch with these people who I'm trying to reach, and I've been fortunate to have some success doing that. So there's some practical advice for those of you just kind of sit and listening to this and you're looking to make some moves. Grind, grind through those DM's. You know you're most likely not going to get a reply, you know, from a lot of people are trying to reach, but I've been fortunate to get, you know, the five to ten replies that have changed my life and I've sent hundreds of messages, you know. So it's like, what do you say successful? If you look at the numbers I wouldn't really call it successful. It's just I've had enough success where, you know, feels it feels good to at least be making progress towards the bigger dream. You know? Yeah, for sure. I've been telling people, like you just got DM for business, like it's not just slide into girls dams and stuff like that. You know right, a hundred percent. Know you're exactly right. I've seen you put out that stuff and you know, I think just just to touch on this, I know you know we're going a little bit long here, but I think a lot of people, with all the social media stuff and sixty seconds or less, like it takes a lot of time to build brand, to build community, to get in touch with these people via DM and I think people try for twenty four, forty, eight hours or even like, you know, a few days or a week, and then when they don't get the replies, they just forget about it and they just move on to the next thing. Like everyone loved the instant gratification of doing this stuff. Yeah, and I think that's what separates me, and that's kind of the second part. Is, like I'm in such a mindset of like I know I'm going to make it that like the struggle and like the rejection and the no replies and stuff like that, it genuinely doesn't get me down and for some reason, even on the toughest days, and that's at on days where I don't want to just give up and pack it in and, you know, Sam a failure and all this stuff, like I have those days, but I have the ability, for some reason, I call it will call whatever, where I wake up the next day, and maybe I learned this in baseball, you...

...know, Short memory and rebounding from adversity and stuff. But like, I know I'm going to push forward. I know even if I feel like quitting, I'm not going to, and I think by having kind of my spirit and my mind aligned in that way, it's allowed me to push through some of the challenges where maybe some other people would have stopped, and I think that's a huge difference as well in terms of getting to the point that I have. Yeah, definitely I feel you on that. Just like a bad days, sometimes you go to bed and you wake up and you're you're like whatever, forget that day and you go on to the next day. And I I just want to tell the people how we connected because it was through I remembers your social media and I remember I was just I went on one of my friends, Eric Stone, you're I know you know him too, and now I just followed. I was like literally just following all of his followers and I followed you, and then that's how we connected. Just be a DM and that's how we're here today, pretty much, which is crazy. So, and that was a couple years ago now. Write a hundred percent, man. So let's just get to these last fun questions. Are you ready for those? Yeah, let's do it all right. So, top five favorite baseball players all time? Gotta go with Jeter, a can griffe Jr. Well, Aaron judge. I love Aaron judges about. I know he's kind of newer to the game. And five and Mariano. Man. I mean I know that's very Yankee heavy, but yeah, those are probably my top five that come to mind right away. Can't go wrong with those guys. Yeah, exactly. And when you're not doing you know, entrepreneur your stuff, what do you like to do in your free time? I love to work out. I consider myself an amateur boxer. I go to boxing class almost every day here in Boston. Honestly, it sounds lame, but I love the work man like I'd pump to have like meetings all day, and especially if they're productive ones, like dude, like the the progress of business, like there's no better feeling than like having that good phone call or closing that deal or, you know, getting that investment from that investor you want. Like that's what I love doing. But I'd say like fitness and golf. Way Love to golf when the weather's Nice, obviously. And Yeah, I would say those are probably my two hobbies for sure. Sure. Well, I appreciate you coming on the show and tell the people where they could follow you at. Yeah, for sure, like I offered earlier, if anyone ever wants, you know, advice or just wants to talk, my instagram is at Aj q Cheo and it's spelled AJTU CEC ioh. One word. You know, feel free to, as Paul said, slide my dms and you know I do read them and I try to reply to everybody's quick as I can. So definitely hit you up there. And if you want to follow Scout Day and be a part of that community, it's just scout day APP one word on Instagram. Two would really appreciate it. I appreciate you coming on. Thankslot, Paul. Thanks for having me.

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