Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 3 years ago

Bobby Del Rio | Average to Savage EP45

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the forty-fifth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring actor Bobby Del Rio. Paul Guarino talked with Bobby Del Rio discussing how he got started acting, his love for fantasy sports, and his future goals! Follow Bobby Del Rio https://www.instagram.com/bobbydelrio/ https://twitter.com/Bobman Powered by Current Wave Marketing www.currentwavemarketing.com

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Greno. Everyone in anyone athletes. So let's and much more so up everybody on back for another episode of the average savage podcast. Or special guest today is actor, writer, filmmaker and producer Bobby del Rio. Bobby, how's it going? Hey, how's it going? Good? How any? Thanks for coming on. Yeah, thanks for having me excited, for sure. For sure, and let's just jump right into I should you give me a little brief background about yourself. Yeah, I've been an actor, writer director for about twenty years up here in Canada and Toronto. I do work around the world, so I've worked in the US quite a bit, but I am based in Toronto. I also do the occasional sports writing. So you know I've had a couple of columns the past few years. Right now I write about basketball, specifically of the Toronto Raptors, but more general NBA content and everything about fantasy basketball. Had A column for a couple of years and the states. That's that's me. Yeah, yeah, just so. So how did you get into the the quote Unquote Hollywood scene? I mean, I guess I always knew I wanted to be an actor yeah, right, ever since I was a child I was in leading plays and it was always know, he's always something I did. So the first US movie that I did I had a small partner movie called cheaters with Jeff Daniels for HBO. And I'm not sure how old I was. Was Nineteen or twenty? Let me in school, I was still in university, in acting school, Peter School, and you know I had Asian I didn't you know, and that. Yeah, so I guess I just been in the system over twenty years. Yeah, you got to in. Like what's it like to go on like, you know, audition? It's weird. I mean I presume even a job interviews and stuff like that. Yeah, so it's you know, it's weird because you've got this sort of like formality of the job interview, but like you're not there to like necessarily talk about what you've done. I mean like that can happen and be like Oh, why you think you be good with this show? Oh well, I think I'd be a great and you come up with some lie that makes you sound good. That can happen to like very informally, but for the most part your you have to have that same job interview energy, but you still have to be an artist. Yeah, so sometimes it's like Oh, hey, thanks for coming in. You like no problem, and they're like okay, go and then it's like you've killed four teenagers and you like high, I'm fine to I'll kill you and like that was good, thanks for coming on, no problem, see you later. You know, it's like it's weird, like you're constantly going back into forth, yeah, between energies, you know, like, yeah, it's kind of like it like a date. Like dates are kind of weird because you have to sort of be somewhat formal and Professional. Yeah, I'm not a psychopath and I'm but I'm a provider and we could have good time to get and then you also have to like demonstrate the qualities of I'm fun and our eye so sexty right now, like you really know how to be, but you know that you're being judged in every second. Yeah, for sure. So how is the change maybe since you've been at the beginning and like now auditions here? Yeah, well, the big thing is that now everything has self tape. Okay, so so you think when? Well, it just means, you know, like you're not usually in the room okay, it's like you, you kind of just like I do. All these are all these auditions on my phone now, and all these actors are task with the sort of expense, any inconvenience, quite frankly, of having to set up your own studio when your apartment or in some cases people will actually pay money to rent, you know, essentially a studio and a studio services to make tapes or any times they're getting the GIG right. So it's like some people will pay like sixty bucks to like make this tape to try and get a job, and often you don't get the job. So, and especially in the self tape...

...world, whereas if you have to actually get twenty people into a room, you know, like you're paying for people's time and you're scheduling, you know, assistance and whatnot. Look, there's costs, but for self tapes, I mean anybody can send in a self tape. So what happens is that now for every audition there's like so much more competition because anybody can send in the tape. So it's harder to get jobs and it's work. Yeah, for sure. Who are they going to open? The people that just like randomly send them into. I mean I think it depends. I mean for the most part, you know, like I'm an actor. Remember it is like the Union for professional film and Television Actors, say Canadian Sag, basically. Yeah, so two things that I audition for almost always go through agents. So there's, you know, somewhat of a vetting process. I have a good agent, right, so it's hard to like get with a good agency. They have to pick you and there's a lot of people want to go there. So then the casting directors will go to all the agents. So now the actors are ready been somewhat vetted there and then they've at them again. So it's like the quality of the agent and the callity the actor. But now when you throw in the tapes, generally what they're doing is they're still sending it to that agent represented pool. But not always. I mean occasionally you'll see, you know, like people will just post on their facebook or email or something about sending a tape. But for the most part, especially for like the real jobs, like the big jobs, to the recognize shows, it's all going through agents. Gotcher, what are some of the shows and movies you've been a part of a lot of stuff. Over twenty years. I mean a lot of stuff is that we shoot up here in Canada is is service. So basically they cast like smaller roles and larger American productions, but generally the products that come up here are productions that are looking for a discount on cost, right, because we have all these big stepsodies. So you've got like you know, you gets sort of a lot of mid tier movies, like the first thing I ever did was this movie, you know, cheaters, Fridge Bo Chef Daniels, and then I think that same year I did a US movie of the week called the Mary Kay laternal story with the LP and Miller. And then, you know, they're also Canadian series up here, like I did a show called instant star that was also on I think it's called the n network or something in the US. It's safely with the DEGRASSI and did a show up here called blue murder, and I've done there is a sci Fi series appear called the Dresden files and you know, just goes on lots and lots and lots of stuff, right. So what about what was your favorite one so far or the couple things? I mean, honestly, the stuff that I prefer the most is the more independent stuff. So right now prepping to act in in the web series that was sold the television called my roommates and escort. Yeah, and it's been one of the most successful Canadian web series. got over like a million viewers for season one. So I'm the mail lead in the show. We're shooting up in sue Saint Marie in Tho few weeks for three weeks. So it's, you know, it's kind of a big job, but it's also like I'm become friends with the creators of the show and I just it's really good writing and the role is good and the people are awesome. So you need to Ta get yeah, you, suld. It's come into what was that? Well, okay, so season one is it's on Youtube. Okay, yeah, and the social first. Season Two they've gotten more money and not like season one was such a big hit that they got like a lot of attention. Yeah, and great reviews and festal coverage and all that. So for season two they were able to get more money. So it's going to sort of be, I would imagine, like a little more hyped, because as you have more resources, you can do more things. Yeah, and now it's like a proper show. Like at the time it was...

...really just, I wouldn't say an experiment, but it was really like independent. For now it's like like even with my agent, you know, it was like I was talking about agent, about the job, everything, and and he was telling me how there was like a breakdown, you know. So it's the same thing. It's like sent all the agents and four season one, like they didn't go through the agents. It was kind of like friends right, like it was like hey, you want to do this? It's like, Oh, cool, I'll do that. Yeah, and then season two is already like much more of a professional experience and they're like, you know, we might be flying you to location. That was like Oh what, like like a plane? I got, like I took up TTC last time, like the subway, you know. Yeah, yeah, it's funny. So, yeah, so basically a project with friends turned and so on bigger now. Yeah, that's that's very much. It's awesome. What do you like to do best? Like acting, writing or producing? Well, given those three options, I think most people would concede that producing is the least fun. It's, you know, the most work. Is Basically you're doing all the logistics, all the business work and often raising the money, sometimes spending the money. So that's never good. You do get power that way, but it's a lot of work. So I'm sort of somewhat torn between acting and writing. I mean acting is really, really fun for me and that's how I said I was my entry point in the industry. But as a writer I've had quite a lot of success, first in theater for for many years and now in the screenwriting world. What are your goals for two thousand and nineteen? Wow, what's good question. I mean I you know, it's such a weird industry because, like literally you could be doing nothing, yeah, for months and then you get a call and now you're busy for the next few months. So for me, I really do simplify. So I'm again. I'm going up to see Saint Marie for three weeks this month playing, you know, a really, really like I'm the mail lead in the show. It's pretty big part. So I just want to focus on that and do the best job I can. And, like, I know that there's going to be a marketing campaign and like a lot, a lot's gonna happen for it. Yeah, but I can't really think about that. All I can really it's like being an athlete. I you know, you've interview a lot of athletes and stuff like that, right, and they all pretty much say the same thing. And I had the athletes mentality that way as well, where I just focus on what I can control. For sure. Yeah, I mean I had a few actors and actors do on the show and they pretty much say the same thing about that. Auditions and the workload and just like. But you just said like some some months you might not be working in might be working for a three weeks or three months or whatever. Yeah, I think, but I think what we're people freak out or they burn out. I mean I mean over twenty years professionally doing this right, like working with like around the world, some of the best people. It's like some people get overwhelmed when they are always thinking big picture. I need to get here, I need to do this any and it's always like, and you know the Trut the reality is that you know, unless you're making your own work, and I you know I've done that as well, it's very random. There's so much inside of your control. You don't know when you're going to get a job you don't know how long the job is going to be as an actor. You don't even know like how if they're going to keep you. You know, like you could have the job. You know, I remember I was in a commercial for beer, for rickards read, if you have that there. I think it's Canadian, but a couple years ago, and you know, I got paid very well. So I got right. I'm in this commercial and it was pretty cool. I was like there's all this crazy stuffimes that I come at into the end. I'm like, Hey, guys, would happened? And it was like so it's like, you know, it's like focus on me, like it's kind of the the button, like the big joke of the spot. Yeah, it's great. It'd be great for coverage, exposure all this. So the commercial finally airs right and I've been I've been telling people, oh, just commercial's gonna be great, and I watched the cars is finally there and they do the whole commercially. Now it's going to go to...

...my part and instead of comets to the logo, commercials over. I'm like, where am I? They cut me out, to cut me out spot. Oh my God. So now they still paid me it's gonna ask. Yeah, so I still make good money on it, you know, but it's still like Oh, but I'm not in it. MMM. But I knew that I was in trouble on the day. Like I was like, HMM, this is suspicious because my part came in at the end, but I don't know if they just screwed up or whatever. They called me in early. So in when you're on set as a union member, like once it gets to like, I don't know what it was like ten hours or something like that. Yeah, you stick, you start doing overtimes. You said to make a lot of money and hour. Yeah, so I'm tracking how many hours. So I didn't go on set until like I've been there for twelve hours, maybe twelve and a half hours, because basically sitting in a trailer. Yeah, so people think it's so glamorous, but I'm just sitting in this room for twelve and a half hours. Okay, so that they have, but I don't know where I was. They happened to have like like story boards of the shot of like like like you know, like the shots they're going to have for the commercial. So I was like all right, well, I mean I'm there for twelve and a half hours or so. It's looking it's surround me. Yeah, and I noticed in the storyboard that my character wasn't in it, and I was like, well, all this must be a mistake. There was like, oh well, maybe it's because they knew. Well, they knew I was going to be heres, so they just didn't want to have my character, you know. But it was like suspicious, right. I was like, like, I think I started researching what happens if I get cut out of a commercial on Google or something. HMM. And then I was like, okay, so they still have to pay me one cycle. They have the painting for the time they pay me. So I knew, whatever, whatever happens, I'm going to I'm gonna make my money. But but yeah, I know. And then, but sure enough, they didn't. They just didn't use me. I shot it, I recorded it. They even did in two languages. So it was funny, right, because we're by lingual, because there's English and French. So I met like the French version of me. So they had like like they it was very weird. I was like there's like four leads, so I was one of them, but they had both languages and they would just shoot the same spots back and forth between English and French. So be like English version, okay, we're done. Cut and then they would just basically the French guys to take the spots to the English guys and then then we just go back and forth all day and they would shoot the French guys and then replace English guys and they would just go shot for shot, specifically making two spots so they could do both languages. But I remember talking to the French version of me and I told him a but this storeboard thing, and he was he was like yeah, he was also worried. So this is part get put in or his part. Guy Cut out too. Well, I mean I didn't see the French part, but if you know, presumably what happened to me having to him. Yeah, that's great, that's crazy. At least you got paid, though. Yeah, no, I paid well. So, I mean it was good that way, but I was kind of a bummer because, you like, in this comer show, it's, you know, even though I've been doing it for so long, it's so it's always fun to be on TV. Yeah, definitely. So how'd you get into sports writing and basketball writing? I started doing fantasy sports. Yeah, so, you know, like I've been just as a hobby, like sort of like a you know, I'm like kind of the best of fantasy sports of all my friends, kind of thing. Yeah, I just love it. Like in high school I was the guy that which is organized the baseball pool, you know, and I'm forty one. I mean we didn't even have the Internet when I was in high school. Yeah, so like literally it's like we're like drafting in person and writing down the names of the players. Who Do you want? I'll take your car, I'll take Carlos by Araga, and then I think the stats would be...

...published in the newspaper for Baseball once a week on Tuesdays. So what I would do is I would add up all the stats for all the players, for all the teams by hand every Tuesday and then one guy beat me on the last day and then he's like Oh, got you whatever. I should have kicked his ass, but anyway, okay, but that's what I did my hands. So formula just always like enjoyed business kind of thing. So a few years ago, I always I just follow a lot of the prominent prospect writers because I'm in a bunch of dimes. You know, do you your fantasy guy? Yeah, okay, so, I mean I play mostly dynasty, okay, because I like to own it. I like to destroy somebody, to steal their soul and do it every years of their lives. And also I love like prospects and rookies and you know, I was a big card collector guy also when I was in high school. So and I have an economic sort of education. So I kind of like the idea of treating players like stocks and bonds. M email, I'm not sure how much day like it, but what are so I like to you know, like I there's the Blue Jays had dominant performance by a rookie picture yesterday named Trent Thorton, who was like a Houston astro sort of minor prospect. And then our team sucks. So he got a start and had eight strikers in five innings and shut out the terrible tigers. This guy suck, yea. So I went and picked him up in five leagues yesterday and we'll see if that pens out. But I like the idea of like, Oh, get in there on early and I met, you know, whatever, the stock. That could help you out. Forever. So I would follow the writers who basically have intelligent things to say. We prospect. So I believe it was John sickles old site minor league ball, and there was another writer there named, I think it's ray will foil, I think that's how you say it, and I was just following him because he always have really good things to stay able my league baseball prospects and I followed him on twitter and then I didn't know. I guess he ran a fantasy side of his own called fake teams, which is like a sports nation, like Fox Yah shoot, which makes sense because I believe minor league ball was box as well. So one day I didn't know him, I just followed him as and ray just posted, hey, we're looking to hire a fantasy basketball writer. Anyone interested? And you know I would like a screenwriter and a playwright for at that point, maybe fifteen years. But I also was like I love fantasy sports as I maybe I'll apply, you know, and I just was like I'd be interested. And then very quickly it's like okay, well, what's your portfolio or whatever, and I was like it's like well, I don't have a portfolio, but like I have a screenwriter and a playwright for a long time and it was like okay, well, why don't you write an article and we'll see if you're any good, right, and the presumably said the same thing to other people, I'm not sure. Yeah, and then I wrote an article and it was really good and he's like, all right, okay, let's try you out once you you know, basically I was on probatients. I just reade a couple more and then can you do some you know, what would you what would like a like a point guard rankings look like or something? So then I did it and it was like good news, like, okay, let's try up. You got the job, as I go. Cool. So then my first few jobs were basically creating rankings for a position, so like powerfulward, center, small board, all this stuff. And I don't know what happened. I mean I don't know if it was just good or if it was like a slow week or whatever, but I started getting my articles republished by Yah who sports almost immediately, which I thought was just normal, but I don't think it is. Yeah, and it was like Oh, like, that's kind of cool. I took remember, told real is that cool? That right? Yeah, who sports republishes US and he's like they do what? And there it is. It's like...

Yah, who sports? There's my name, Bobby Ze Ryo, and here's my rankings, and they were pretty thorough and I had good explanations and I was using advanced stats as well, which at the time what nobody now now like gives common in basketball writing, where I'll mention things like Chouse, shooting percentage and model, but that the time they know. But he was using those terms, but I started using them because I was like I wanted my articles to stand out a little bit. HMM. And then it was pretty cool and I started build a readership. And then, I swear to God, I'd only been there like a month maybe, and then I get dmed by Andy Barrens. For Mea who sports, who I didn't know at all, who was like kind of like my idol, like I just loved his his style. You knew all his fantasies, that he's also hilarious, and I always read as articles for years when I was just a player. And then he DM's mean. He's like Hey, like, we've been reading articles and there they're good. We would you like to compete in the YAK WHO expert League. So I got invited to the Yak who friends and Family League, which is basically just, you know, kind of the most wellknown Spanishy basketball writers in the US mostly invited to be part of this thing, and so I told my editor. He was like, well, I was like the first person of the company that ever be invite into that league. So I kept writing about it in and then I end up finishing second place and I lost a yeah who, Scott Pianowski, in the finals. But it was, you know, pretty amazing, like I kind of went from just like this is a fun hobby to like I'll try this, to like an industry expert very quickly, and then competing against industry experts and not only holding my own but but really dominating that League for sure. So it was pretty cool, like it was a really cool experience that it started my my sports writing career. Yeah, to have the power social media. Huh. Yeah, exactly. So you're being into the basketball and baseball fantasy yeah, I play all of them. I mean you American football team, yeah, and hockey appear in Canada's a big one. Basketball is my favorite, my favorite sport. I think baseball might be my best, because baseball is more logical statistically than small busketballs. Odd You said got we're like in baseball, you know, for guys, a lot of home I was going a lot of you guys. Yeah, you know a guy who scores a lot of runs. If she you know, she was a lot of basis. Apply small more runs, the figure. Just a lot of strike. Guys are probably get mobiles. Like it's like this kind of like it's kind of like there's more, sort of like co related stats. We're basketball. It's weird, man. I mean you got some guys you just want to rebound, to shoot threes, but he can't hit free throws, but he gets steals. This guy is like, you know, this guy will pass the ball and he gets blocks that he can't shoot. See, your constantly going, wait, what, like, bast what you have? You have to know the guys. You have to know who plays and does what your baseball. You don't really need to know at all. Yeah, that's true. You ready for some fun questions, but those were the fun questions. Oh yeah, those were two. But how'd you get the nickname Bob Man? So, if you ever want a nickname of your preference, just start calling yourself that and other people will follow suit. I actually named myself during Frosh Week Undergrad when I was at ut sure, my first year for economics and we it was you know what a ready t shirts, you just put like a name tag. It was kind of a funny design. So I don't know why. I just wrote Bob Man. I just thought that would be interesting. And then, I don't know, people start calling you bob man after a while. And then I I did this thing in the industry. I'd write very, very formal like emails and then I would sign off Bob men,...

...which I thought was hilarious and, you know, created some awkward situations, but I thought it was actually funny. Then it was awkward because then people would respond to me and sometimes, if they had a good sense of human like a Bob Man, yeah, and other people would be like well, Bob, I don't know if that would be possible. To consider it. Yeah, just so. So now now I don't know, I just kept I guess I've been doing it for so long that people call me Bob and like all the time. And what do you do in your free time when you're not working for you my mother I mean this, this, you know, I don't know. I work all the time, you know, and then I guess. You know, I'm always researching sports, as long as sports, but then thinks I I'm also a sports writer, like I had, you know, I'm going to have a basketball column right now. So I don't know. I mean, I guess that's kind of work too. Yeah, so I guess nothing. Now I'M gonna cry. So, yeah, but the sports is the fun work. Yeah, it doesn't feel like well, also, I mean act, write. You know, I love that too. Work out a lot. So that okay. Yeah, maybe that counts all right. Last one. Can you give me your like top five favorite movies ever? Like a movie movies ever? Oh Man, so, so I was also a programmer for five years at the Festival in Toronto, so I watched a lot of movies. They're picking about movies. So it would be very, very hard for me to you know, I have to take a lot of time and run a master's pieces about the five best films of all time. But I will say five of my favorite film will be from different eras, because I think different films say different things about our culture at different time. So citizen Kain, you know, which was one of the most innovative movies of all time and still holds up today screen of Classic Film, The Godfather, maybe because I'm half Italian, but I mean, you know, to change their entire culture, Pulp Fiction, which I think change the contemporary narrative basically, since pulp fiction the way screen plays are written in terms of time shifting and sort of accepted narratives and check the position of like comedy with violence, I thought, I think, became very, very mainstream and accepted. Where is it wasn't that way before. Like pulp fiction was quite innovative at the time, but now a lot of movies kind of employ those conventions. And then I'll just throw in a couple of movie that I really enjoy, eternal sunshine of the spotless mind, which also I think it's the most creative, you know, movies ever made in terms of really everything right, like visually and story. I really appreciate like a complex narrative, like something that kind of shifts back and forth through time and different ways. And I also really like the movie her. Yeah, just but yeah, that was very like a contemporary love story in a sort of sad technological way. which and I think there's just going to be a lot more movies like that, because I think that's more society had. Definitely. Well, I appreciate you coming on work a day. Find you on social media. Well, you know, in line with what we were just talking about, my twitter handle is at Bob Man. That's probably the best way to follow what I'm doing. A lot of people are very surprised now that like how did you get at Bob Man? I actually had this guy who I guess he's a rapper, who calls himself bought man, and he wanted to negotiate the purchase of my twitter handle. And then as like okay, Tenzeros,...

...and then here's like don't worry about it here, yeah, at Bob Man. Feel Fall Bob Man on twitter. All, I appreciate you coming up. Thanks for having me. Brother.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (173)