Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Dan Orlovsky | Average To Savage EP67

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the sixty-seventh episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring ESPN football analyst and former NFL quarterback Dan Orlovsky. Paul Guarino talked with Dan Orlovsky discussing his time at UConn, his experience in the NFL, and his current position his a football analyst at ESPN. Follow Dan Orlovsky https://www.instagram.com/DOrlovsky

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Greno, everyone in anyone, athletes, swebs and much more. WHAT'S UP, everybody? On back for another episode of the average savage podcast. Our special guests today is former NFL quarterback and ESPN analyst Daniel Lawski. Dan, how's it going? Very good man. How are you good? Good, I appreciate you coming on for sure. Let's just go back a little bit. Growing up in Connecticut, how did you first get involved in football? Started playing football about eight or nine years old. I always played baseball at a super young age. Football was something that would is introduced to be by my dad and played flag football for the first couple of years of my kind of football life, if you want to call it that, and then from there went to two years of Pop Warner. Luckily, where I grew up in Shelton, Connecticut, it's a really rich sports area and really rich football area and so, coupled with Evans talent to throw and the kind of the culture I grew up in, I fell in love with football. Yeah, Gotcha, and you went on to dominate at Shelton High School and you want State Championship and your named all American and then what was your like recruiting process? Like, recruit process was kind of it was a little bit late. You con was on me earlier in most often from about my sophomore year, and then I would get your random letters here and there. That work, I would imagine, pretty customary for a lot of recruits. And then once I committed, I I started making some official visits to Virginia on Michigan stayed and purdue and Yukon. It stayed on me and then I committed to Yukon before my senior season and then are recruiting really picked up where I was getting, you know, offers or letters from Penn, staid, Tennessee and Florida, but I was so committed...

...to Yukon and coach that. So. So my recruitment was it crazy heavy, but once I made a commitment to Yukon it actually picked up a little bit. Now it's crazy. So so you basically chose Yukon just because they were with you the whole time? Yeah, I chose Yukon because one that came in first to I really fell in love with coach ets on his message in the challenge that he presented in three I wanted to try and go do something that everyone thought would be crazy or impossible. Yeah, for sure, for sure. And what was your overall experience like at Yukon? It was incredible. It was an experience that I could only had hoped for, and tenfold. I just the the relationships that were built, the challenges that were faced, the adversity that was overcome. The less we're learned. Being from the state of Connecticut and then going and being a part of what I was a part of a Yukon, I still I still get talked about, I still talked to. Just would I would close to where I am right now if not for my time at Yukon? Yeah, for sure, I think just like you mentioned before, you you on the you wanted that challenge and you were the one that put Yukon football on the map. I was fortunate. I was a part of early important program I was a part of a really good team. We had a lot of good players and, like I said, like you go there with the dream or a vision or goal and then you accomplish it and probably exceed it and it was really, really rewarding. Definitely. Definitely. And when did you think you had like a shot and making the NFL. I would say back into my sophomore year college is when I actually thought, all right, this might happen. It was always obviously a dream or a wish or gold. But back into my sophomore season we started playing some more notarized National Games. I started playing pretty good and...

...then my name started getting floated around with guys like Mel Kyper and some of the draft people. Realize like, okay, this is this is no longer just like a childhood wish up on a start. I think this is got the chance to be a reality. And I knew I went to school and I got in trouble for this at school. Like I always said, there was no plan B. I had always said all my eggs are in one basket. I was going to make this happen and there wasn't or else. So once that most softmore season got it kind of got concluded. That's what I was like. Yeah, this, this is going to happen. I'm going to make this actually fall into place. You have to get I like that. I like that. You said that you don't have a plan to be but going going into the draft, what was like your projection like before the draft and getting drafted in the fifth round was at exceeding your not exceeding your expectations. Yeah, I mean higher expectations than that. You know, the draft is a very unique process where it's not something you work for to for one or two years. You work for it for ten, twelve years, and it's it's a process that a lot of people see it differently and whatnot. And I thought I would go in like the secred third round. Kind of the information for my agents was a little bit scattered. But when you think about yourself, when your agent tells you you don't, he doesn't know where you might fall. You don't, you're like are yeah right, there's no chance. Yeah, so I end up going in the fifth round, which was really frustrating and disappointing, but also you for and very emotional. You quickly realize, and everyone has heard it, it's not where you start, it's where you finish, what you do when you get their type thing, and that was a motivating factor for me for sure. And and I was fortunate to be drafted to an organization that getting a chance and certainly...

...difficult time, but I had an opportunity to get there and again from there I felt like I controlled what was going to be the next decade. Yeah, definitely, definitely. And now, being a ESPN NFL analysts, like, what do you think most change about the draft from like two thousand and five to like now? Certainly the coverage. Yeah, you know that the draft is become its own entity and its own spectacle, and in Mel kiper certainly is a big part of that. But you know, it's still scrutinized in the same way. I would say because of social media, there's more few pointed opinions on the draft, on people on teams. Everybody now has the opportunity to save their opinion word say what they think about their team or about this player getting drafted here and so no longer is it really just individuals on a network. It's now, because of social media, that is everybody's own individual network. Let's say. That's the biggest thing, and there's a there's a lot of there's a lot of stuff out there that is tied to the draft. Now it's also what makes the draft so cool. But it's still the same thing. It is stible dreams getting fulfilled and heart work paying off and families celebrating. It is still athletes proving doubt or is wrong. It is still athletes being rewarded for their sacrifices. It is still new beginnings. It's still a lot of the same things that have been happening on happening for decades. Definitely, definitely. And going back to Detroit, when they drafted you, what was your first year like there? And then, I believe, yeah, you gotten what was your first game like, like your first pro NFL game? Yeah, my first year was wild. I mean we were terrible as a football team and you go this is the NFL. Now want to Detroit in two thousand and five when the economic recession started and...

...the obviously there's some challenging times in Detroit when the economy started to fall off and then there's some challenging times in Detroit when you're there and December and January in the weather, and so there was a lot of really challenging aspects. You get thrown out there and you go from, I say this like it's really aren't. You get thrown from being college and being with your peers and I slept on a foot on and kicked it with my buddies and play video games and play football. Then I'm going to locker room with thirty year old men and and there's a lot of challenges that go along with that. But also, at the same time I was in the NFL and it was it was I was in the coolest job ever. By first game, our first time ever playing, was, I believe, the second game of the year, a third game of the air. Were at the on the road against Chicago. I was the number two quarterback. We were getting absolutely buried by them. Joey Harrington was our starting quarterback and he was struggling and they ended up kind of sitting joey down in the fourth quarter and I was forced to go play and was just trying to like make sure that I didn't do anything catastrophic out there. I was just trying to get a play call and get a snapped and whatnot. And and I played a little bit that year because, because of the struggles we had as a football team, our head coach, Steve Mary, she got fired. So it was a it was a unique situation, let's say that. Definitely. Definitely. Then in hundred and eight you got your chance to play more and start a few games. And what was it like getting your first touchdown? Yeah, I mean getting it first starts. Amazing. You get the opportunity to be the guy, you get the opportunity to start the game, your starting quarterback in the NFL. There's only so many people who could ever say that in the history of the world. So really cool. Unfortunately, we were really bad football team. Unfortunately I made a really bone headed play in my first start. But never the less, I accomplished something that was always a goal. I accomplish something...

...that was always a dream. I accomplished something that ninety nine percent of the people that I'd ever come across with thought never happened in my life. So a lot of positives for me that I took from it. Yeah, definitely. Who was your first touchdown? Passed to leave. My first career touchdown passed was to Roy Williams, okay, the University of Texas. Yeah, it was a like a bootleg or naked or a quarterback keeper off motion and through it to Roy. Wasn't a I think it was four, five, six yards. I'm like that got you, got you, got you. So after that season you were free agent, so you got to like pick where you wanted to go. What was that like? Verty was dope, you know, Fret, Tosese cold to want to be wanted. Yeah, and get to hit it for the first time. And and took a couple visits and went down to Houston and certainly a unique business aspect for my agent. You know, kind of played some games and in Tut kind of contract offer and and I am who's like take that offer and music just let me work and a couple hours later kind of tripled that offer. So fregency, it was cool. It was it was nice to kind of experience and certainly financially, was the benefit of it. Definitely, definitely now like overall, like being a carayer back up mostly, like how did you prepare to be ready to like start? Well, the number one thing for me was I never thought of myself in that capacity. For your opportunity in the NFL usually get one and you better be ready for that opportunity and I never wanted to regret. I never wanted to have regret be a part of my career where the opportunity presented itself and I was not ready. And so I always prepared and practiced and got myself ready. And what about my business? On Friday nights or a Saturday, like I was going to take the first step.

I owed it to myself, I owed it to my future self, I owed it to my teammates to think in that capacity. Definitely studied a ton and watched an extreme amount of film. That was going to be my I don't want to say preparation, but that was going to be how I was able to go confidently onto the field as if I mentally knew my game plan and mentally studied a ton of tape and knew my teeth the defense. I felt like I could go on the field confident in play if I didn't have a thousand reps. definitely a fly. And what made you go back to Detroit two thousand and fourteen? Jim called, well, that coach who I had the opportunity to play for in two thousand and eleven, was certainly part of that. I always loved the Michigan I always loved the people there. strengthly money, you know, and you know the contract that was offered to me. I did not know Matthew Stafford at that time, but I was super intrigued with working with them and that's that was the main motivation. Got You, got you and like what advice would you get to a young football player trying to get a d one scholarship or trying to make it to the NFL. It will take more work than you could ever fathom. It will take more sacrifice than you can ever fathom. It will unquestionably challenge you in ways that you never thought you would be challenged. It will be one hundred percent be worth it. I've been around a lot of guys that regret and will send me messages or semi notes or call your text message me and they will always say, I wish I worked harder, I wish I focus more, I wish I listened to you, I wish I worked out with you or whatever. I don't have a single guy but has ever called me and said it. Never it wasn't worth it. You know what, the work that we put in did. It pay off. Don't listen to other people. Accept the people that matter to you. Again, I played for twelve years in the NFL and ninety nine percent of the people that I had come...

...across in my life told me I never would. So you're always no matter how good you are, someone's going to tell me tell you you can't. Just because someone tells you you can, does it mean you have and you. It's important to understand that it doesn't happen overnight. Happens to failure and you've got to be willing to fail to get there. You've got to be willing to believe in yourself enough to put yourself out there, enough to fail to get there. There might be the random one percent that they're just the freaks. The rest of the guys that make it make it because they believe in themselves and they don't have a failed clause, they don't have a bailout plan. They control, but they control. I consider it saying, as a thirty five year old, I don't regret a single moment where I chose my football career over a party or over doing this or doing that. I always put that first when I was young and it paid off. Definitely, definitely. So, after you retire in two thousand and seventeen, did you know you wanted to be like a NFL analyst, or did it just happen? I had always thought of getting into television, you know, I'd always I was never the person. I'm a big person, I'm a big picture thinker, but I never put action towards that picture, meaning what I was playing football I didn't really think about what I was going to do after football because I was getting paid to focus on being a football player. Yeah, that was my job and then when I got done, I certainly had the thought of what I was going to do, but I never really was a tanking steps towards that. And when I got done, I thought about getting into television and then I started doing some stuff and start started to really like it and then okay, I'm feel like I'm doing some stuff here that's pretty cool and I'm good at and so they can kind of opened some doors for me social media wise, and that's kind of how I ended up. An...

...is again, correct me if I'm wrong. I think you were putting out stuff on social media, just like plays and stuff like that, and then it picked up. And is that how ESPN saw you? Yeah, yeah, I just started breaking down stuff on twitter and then that kind of game traction and that open up some doors from networks getting hey, will you come on our show and do this on you know. So I would drive up to New York City from Philadelphia on my own and I would do I would pay for my own train or pay for my own rod and I'd go up there and do my own work just to again, I believed in it. I believed in myself and and I thought that if I went out and showed doors, it open and they did. And that's when a couple of networks came calling and I was fortunate enough to have a couple options and fortunate and glass to work. You know, make a decision to go work Crispian and be a part of their great company. Definitely, definitely. You got any predictions for the two thousand and nineteen season? Predictions are tricky because you don't know necessarily how everything will unfold and injuries and whatnot. I do know that this is probably the health east the NFL has been in a long time. When it comes to the teams, you could go to every division in point to two teams at least that you can see winning that division and making the playoff front, outside of maybe the AFC east, and they had the defending super bowl champion. The AFC is loaded with young quarterback talent. The NFC is loaded with proven quarterback talent and it's it'll be a fun year. They to sit there and say, like I love the chiefs, but their defense concerns me. I love the browns. Can they do it? I love the cults, I love the Patriots, still the charges. I mean every everyone's going to be very good. The Falcons, are they healthy gans that they are, their super bowl contenders. The cowboys are loaded. The Eagles will be unbelievable. So I know that's not necessarily a prediction, but their kind of their Turkey. Got You got? Is there any? What about? Is there any quarterbacks that you're looking forward to see? Certainly Baker,...

...certainly kind of Marie, certainly Andrew. Look, certainly Carson Wentz. I love watching all quarterbacks. Got You got you. Are you ready for some fun questions? They're going to go from average savage. What's your favorite Song Right now? Cool by the Jonas brothers. That was fast. Usually people are thinking about it. What about? I'd say cold by the Jonas brothers, or one man band, by All Dominion? All right. What about what are three jerseys that you want that you don't own? I don't own any jerseys. That's a lie. I OWN ONE JERSEY. It's signed by Calvin Johnson, who I was fortunate enough to play with. I don't have a desire to go get anybody's Jersey. Are. I've played with Hall of famers. I played with Peyton manning and Calvin Johnson, Reggie Wayne and Andre Johnson. Play with a lot of great players. I don't have desires to go ahead go get anybody's Jersey. If I could go get one Jersey signed right now, we would be Carson Wentz. My Wife's family and are from Philly. My kids are eagles fans, so I'd go get a West Jersey signed for them all. That's cool. Last one, top five quarterbacks of all time, like your favorite favorite quarterbacks of all time. John Elway for the for the toughness that he played with, bred farm for the courageousness that he played with, Peyton many for the precision that he played with, Tom Big pretty for the obsession that he played with, and I'm going to send a teammate of mine, Matthew Stafford, for the toughness that they played with. He's also a good friend of mine, so I allowed to put him in my top five. Perfect. I appreciate you coming on. I can you. Let's let people know where they can follow you on social media. Yeah, just at Dan Orlovski. The number seven on twitter is the best option. All right, once again appreciate it and good luck this season thanks to that's it.

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