Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 6 months ago

Elliot Gerard and Jonah Ballow | Average to Savage EP165

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and sixty-fifth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring entrepreneurs Elliot Gerard and Jonah Ballow. Paul Guarino talked with Elliot Gerard and Jonah Ballow discussing their career journeys, founding the Heartlent Group, and the upcoming project they are working on.  

Follow Elliot Gerard and Jonah Ballow https://www.instagram.com/HeartlentGroup https://www.instagram.com/elliotgerard/ https://www.instagram.com/jonahballow/  

This podcast interview with Elliot Gerard and Jonah Ballow was originally recorded on February 4, 2021

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Grino. Everyone in anyone, athletes, so ebs and much more so. Up Everybody. Welcome back to another episode of the average savage podcast. Our special guests. We got Jonah and Elliott from the heartland group. How's it going, guys? Hey, what's up, Paul, excited to be on. Appreciate you guys coming on. So let's just go back. I know we already work together, so we kind of know each other, but like, tell me a little bit about both of your backgrounds and then how you guys kind of got started in like media and sports and marketing and all, because you guys do everything. Yeah, I could start, you know, and and it's good to do it this way because our lives are intertwined for better or worse. Elliot and I I've been working together for quite some time. I started in sports radio, actually, coming out of college in Kansas City. I've worked at sixteen sports both on the mic behind the MIC, doing some producer work, and then, what's the Minnesota Timberwolves, to start running digital there. This is before twitter. So I'm going to age myself right now and and then after about three years in Minnesota, made the leap to Madison Square Garden and worked for the New York Knicks and we're in the digital department. Traveled with the team, you know, from the camera, behind the camera, kind of doing doing it all there, and it was blast. Had A lot of fun. Took a lot of years off my life, but some great learning lessons there and some really good opportunities to learn digital and how to bring that to the fans. And obviously we're seeing all that explode now. And while I was there, you know, looking for original content, trying to always think outside the box, discovered Elliott on twitter, I believe, and we connected and then we started a collaboraty and we just had this sort of kind of magical experience where we could whatever was in my head is as far as design creation, that there's no way I could even put pen to paper or on a even in a the they'll be sweet. Elliott found a way to bring that to life and we quickly sort of geled in that way and created a ton of content for about three years. And when I decided to kind of make the jump outside of Matts Square Garden to do something a little different, I picked Elliott's frame. We had a discussion. He said you got to come join me at this marketing agency I'm at. And there it was sort of a start up within a bigger, larger experiential agency, which excited me and the opportunities and again for Elliot and I to work together. And our boss of the time was Keith Steckler and he is our third partner at Heart Link Group now. So we formed, you know, a trio there with some really good chemistry and we all provide different skill sets to the table. And you know now we're at Hartland group well, with our own digital content agency. Or we'll just take your slogan say we do it all. I like that one. But yeah, that's that's a little bit of sort of the trajectory. And Elliott, you know you can fill the holes with your experience. Sure, yeah, I'm going to put that. We're going to put that big on the site. Do it all. And Yeah, I know you know that story. Always love that story because I think you know, I love to build relationship to the clients and obviously, for better of worse, I felt to go on with Jonah, I think, some days. But so yeah, you know, it's I've I've had a long road. I went to Pratt for design and masters and and from there I kind of like bounced around. I was at like a really small agency I worked and as a designer and finance, which was I want to shoot myself every day. And and then I work for a gaming industry, which is really fun and that and there's called Turtle Beach. We actually started working with, you know, ee teams and actual players, like we did custom headsets, Ford's briant and who else? Oh, D White Howard and some other players and stuff like that, and that that's kind of like where I started...

...doing that stuff. And then, you know, I was just passionate about the knicks and that's where Jonah found me. But at the time I had started doing stuff with the ESPN as well on the side, and you know, they were giving me projects where's like hey, it's for clock. Can you finish illustration for us by, you know, end of the Eastern Conference playoff game, which probably ends like thirty or on that seventh that starts at thirty or eight, you know. So I would finish stuff in like six hours and that's why I kept on coming back to me. And and yeah, that that was you know that I really started a whole adventure where I had my own company as well as working for marketing. You know, I went to marking streaming agency after that, after Turtle Beach and and then ended up at a large range, AHC Mktg, where I convinced Jonah the coming me. I think like some of my claim to fame, and I think my story is interesting, is, including Renee's. A lot of athletes have found me on Socialle you know, renea being one of the most awesome experiences. You know, she found me through the Rock, the boat stuff that we get together. But, like you know, one that story I probably tell too much is, you know, Lebron James found my artwork that I did for fansided on this small blog. I still I still want to know how it happened, but he found it and he ended up using it to go Zeero, our thirty in two thousand and seventeen, and that was pretty awesome because I ended up working with a cavs I'm in a mural and then recently, heart James Harden found my work that I did with a Haitian artist. It was a collaboration and they ended up making a basketball court and Haiti for it, which was awesome because it was like for good cause, it was like for the community, you know, so that a lot of these kids can live their dream like or, you know, trained to become a basketball player, just like harden. So yeah, it's been it's been cool to see that athletes have recognized what I've done and the energy I bring to my creativity. So, you know, that's why we also loves working with you guys. Yeah, know for sure. Yeah, that's Ay. It's like the power of social media is like crazy and I think still people underestimated to this day, and it's like it's just weird to me that people still like I work with athletes all time. I'm like no, you got to be on all three of these platforms, facebook, instagram, twitter, now, tick tock to so, like I'm like, you gotta be on it because you never know what happened, like something like. I do it all the time, I'm sure you guys doing. You Post it, you post it all three or four places and then you get one interaction that might be completely different than on one other platform. Yeah, and you never know. Right, there's that's what I always tell Elliott. Like the engagement sometimes, you know, Oh, is dextermental to the overall potential opportunity. You know, it isn't just something that you look at for letting engagment. All these things are nice, but sometimes I can mess with people men and it's not necessarily beneficial to when to accomplish but there's always that chance that that person's to find et at Gerard's work in New York while he's in Cleveland or L or with the Miami he it's most likely not going to happen. And this is what's kind of awesome about social media and the power of it. And we're still in the infancy stages up it and I think that's why at times there's a lot of skepticism around the platforms and the power of it. But our company now, I mean the reason why we've been able to succeed so fast is to be able to showcase the work on social media platforms and also strategically work the platforms for our advantage and places where we can reach people that would need that type of content. So I think it's an amazing powerful tool and I have learned so much. You know, I look at it and view it through the lens of use, using it as a tool, especially twitter, and I've learned so much from people, I've connected with people, I've...

...been able to make friends and colleagues and partnerships like Elliott, like this is a lifelong friendship and partnership that we have just because we met on twitter. I mean that is a crazy thing if you think about it. So it really is powerful and and I'm glad that, Paul, you embraces as well and continue to push, you know, athletes to use it, because I think it's going to be less and less about like how the athlete is just like Hey, look at my cool highlights or, you know, going on and you know, maybe having some commentary to to his fan base and more about another way to potentially be lucrative and to get business and to bring some more money into their pockets and also brand themselves, like can own their own platforms now, which is which is very exciting and it just sorry, I don't mean to jump in, Paul, if you have a question, I can, I can come in afters. No, no, keep it on. Well, I just think you know, you you talk about how it's in Infinitcy, infancy, and you know, I think it's actually going to an infinite place with with metavers coming in and NFT's and it's all starting to mix together. And you know, not the plug what we did, but are creating the first female athlete and I t series was was that, you know, our claim, one of our claims to fame. But, like the idea of it, you don't even know where it's going to go. It's so interesting to see how this is connecting to so many different things and helping artists in so many different ways to make more money as well as athletes. It just seems like it's gonna meet. I don't know if it's in its adolescent phased yet, but it seems like it's about to hit this new peak. That that or maybe it's doing it every day, but I don't know, it seems like somebody is going to explode. It already is, but almost like the next chapters about to start. I feel like yeah, no, definitely, like I feel like even obviously, like through coronavirus, like it was like normal stuff, like regular, like I guess you'd say, you this web to stuff and now like everything's like changing again, like right, I feel like currently and it's pretty interesting, but it's like it's dope too because, like you said, like like even probably for you eliots, it be an artist or like more people are like appreciating are and I seen like artists now that we're like, quote unquote, starving artists and now they're like millionaires because of n of teas, and it's, like I say, it's like insane, like I don't even at first I couldn't wrap my header. I remember we had the conversation last year. We didn't really know what we were doing, but we knew it was dope. And now it's like now it's like kind of I wouldn't say mainstream, but it's getting there. It's like, I think the status still like I think for four percent of Americans own nfte's right now, so super early slot. Yeah, that's actually surprised. I didn't think it would be that high. and also it's ever evolving. That's that's what I love about it. Right like every day is something different in the space. You know, with TV, radio, newspapers probably expanded it as much as it possibly could be and there's this new medium these new mediums in which you can create content and connect the fans. The way I look at nft's is a little bit different than I think some some people may view them as far as like hey, I put my piece of content or artwork or whatever it is, and it's sold on an auction. I think there's a utility to it. I think that is going to be the next step and really connecting fans to experience is that they wouldn't get anywhere else. And also, Hey, we've been doing this for years and marketing right. Like the first one thousand five hundred fans that step in and Rena get a poster, the the same thing said. Now you get a digital collectible that you can showcase to your friends, your family and then also sell it. So I just think once we get past the stage of skepticism, which always occurs. It happened with the with the Internet, right, it happened with email, it happened with social media. Yeah, so it's like once we get past that and everybody's, you know, says they're their opinion on it, we move past, you know, the skepticism era,...

...will get to the point where I think people will start to see it as a utility and that's when it's going to get really interesting. Yeah, I think that's what people aren't seeing. Yeah, it's almost like the same stuff. We already been doing it, just in a different form. Yeah, yeah, that's a lot. It's hard, though, right like I was just having a conversation with my parents the other day about you know, I'm the last generation that had the internet and didn't have the Internet. Yeah, yeah, no, experiencing both of those. Like you know, Elliott's kids only know the Internet. That's the only thing they know. They don't know a pre world that existed without it. So we're in this weird shift that I think it's going to take a little bit. But then the younger kids are going to be the ones making the decisions and they're going to come up with the Internet and they're going to come up with N FFTS and there come up with web three and that a verse or whatever happens next. So that's really what's going to define the next level of creation, my opinion. I think in a weird way, like nfts are like taking the the social taking social media and making it tangible. Even though it's not tangible, it is tangible, if that makes sense, because, like you're saying, instead of getting a poster, you're getting an NFT and and you can place it and you can share it and it's yours and your Avatar can be, you know, cuts customized for certain shape so that you know that it's an nft. So I just feel like there's like it's becoming a physical form and then obviously you talk about the metaverse and then it becomes like a d physical form, so everything's you know, and then like just being able to have d printers so that you could take a digital piece and make it a tangible piece itself. So it's all kind of melding together and some weird, I don't know, almost like a Jackson pollock painting where everything's flattering on the wall. But yeah, like I like physical things, but now, like when I think about it, I'm like okay, like now I don't want to physically like obviously memorialis dope and stuff, but like if I have ticket stubs like in my wallet, it's like that's even Dover because you could just like show everybody like or share it, like just like where you were just saying. It's a keepsake right, like it's funny. My GRANDPA collected stamps. Did did his dad laugh at them and be like you Etiot? Why'd you? I'm sure you probably did, but you know what I mean. Like people collected beanie babies, you know, and pongs and all these kinds of weird things right those there it means. Listen, I always I thought about this to day it. You know, it's I'm up very much on the market always dictates the value of anything. Right, if there's a market value for it, then somebody's willing to pay a price for it and that's where it's worth. And I think there is things that means something to certain people and a certain moment. I've been to sporting events that really wouldn't mean anything to anybody else but me and my friends that were at it, because it was special in that way. and to have a shared experience of an nft or collectible that we all could have and sort of part of your memories and everything going digital, I think there's a lot there to it. And then if you can unlock, you know, the experience you could have with an athlete, you know, like if you could, if you got one of those and if t's that renee was selling, and then that unlocked, you know, a chance to go to Atlanta Hawks game and and join her on a broadcast or shadow her for a day or whatever it is, you know like that that could be super meaningful to a person. Then it takes it to a whole another level of memories, right that you can generate. So I think we're getting there, I think. And also the barrier for entry right in Cryptos made it difficult for some people to wrap their heads around and and now that you can buy with dollars and it's less of a barrier to entry, I think they're going to be more people who are are adopting to it and getting into it. Yeah, yeah, for sure. And I know. All right, so you guys work with a whole bunch of different companies and people and athletes and everything and celebrities over the past couple of years and I know you want a lot of different awards, but like what what I've been your guys is like kind of like top project to say you worked on, and then what, like, what kind of projects are you guys working on...

...now? Well, this one behind me, you know, rocket. I'm also very passionate about politics, about voting rights. So the fact that so many athletes, and including renee, just just like we're so involved and so excited to be a part of this. You know, we rock the Holl came to me and they were like hey, can you do like ten to fifteen? And I'm like, what if we did fifty, fifty, like I'mmural. We put it up on Turner because Turner was involved, and it exploded to four hundred. You know, may can I elliot? Can I jump in real quick? Let me just explain what it is, because I don't think everybody listening to here knows what all you're talking about. Let's fine. So, yeah, I know, but let's pretend everybody listening on a podcast, which for we're on. So rock the vote came to Elliott with an idea that basically they wanted it a large campaign to get celebrities, mainly athletes, involved in promoting and in encouraging people to ex exercise their right to vote right, get out and vote. We know that in the last election it was record numbers and we believe this was a large part of it. So Elliott was originally scope to only you know how many was it as? I how many and I push ten to fifty in many and they push in. Ended up doing four hundred custom graphics that really showcase the story of each athlete celebrity through icons. It's very visually appealing. And then all these celebrities, athletes, influencers posted the graphic with the call to action to go out exercise your votes. Right. Well, then side there were four hundred nine. Also was a big check mark on their face, like across the faces, and what it was saying was like, I'm a voter, I'm also all these other things. It talked about their their careers, that talked about what their passions were. They talked about the causes. They did like Elena del down and all the causes that she's a part of. I'm blanking on what they are, but but yeah, so, so I really wanted to capture them as a person and say, like, we're all people and we're all voters and we all matter and and I think that a lot of people understood that in that's in the hooper space. But then it actually expanded into kickoff the boat, which was a week can before voting started, and it was for NFL. I mean we literally worked with almost every players association on this. We work with the WNBPA, the NBPA, the NFLPA. The were tired National Basketball Players Association all because people just got so excited and, you know, obviously it was during a election year and everything. We ended up working with the Biden campaign separately, which maybe, you know, maybe that's a little biased, but you know, because voting supposed to be for everyone. But wink wink, magandge. But yeah, so it was just just from a personal standpoint, from winning fourteen awards, from the connections we made. You know, we've worked with almost all that. We've worked with athletes, we've worked with these players association since and you know, really put us on the map. Was One of our first projects when we launched Charlotte and heartland means heart and talent, and I put my whole heart, because I believe in this, into this project and it showed and I think that that's why we part of the reason we've done so well in this year. It's because it showed the passion we have and how will take a fifteen, a scope of fifteen, and make them four hundred and then add on Aar filters and build a brand, you know, because we built brands for both Hooper's vote and kick off the vote and they were like logos and all that, starting from fifteen illustrations. So you know that's a that's my favorite. How about you a have have an Aga? Yeah, no, I mean that would obviously was a big one and mental lots the company. Right now we're working on we're actually actually about to wrap it up, our campaign with the NFLPA and again, a lot of these projects that will be talking about...

...today. I have a very similar feel in the sense that there is a component of it of either community activation or donations or money going to a foundation or celebrating athletes that do more. And I've always thought with my time working with the timber rose and the Knicks and you get a different perspective, and Paul, you would know this very well too. When you are in day to day conversations with athletes or working with them, you see, you understand these are human beings and I don't know if a lot of fans have that feeling towards them. End. Listen, because of Fandom, you know, sports are exploding. Everybody's making a lot of money. I understand that, but I and they just think because of player x makes a certain amount of money, that you can treat them or that they can't make mistakes and recover or they go through the same trials and tribulations that we all do as people and they're doing it at a very young age and it's very difficult. So I gained a ton of perspective working for the team's when I started traveling and getting to know the players on a different level, seeing their lives, seeing the injuries that they have to go through and the toll that the sport takes on their bodies. And yes, there's a lot of money there and that's why they get paid. But that segues into, you know, this project with the NFLPA and they have a community MVP award that goes out every week that celebrates one of these players and what they do in their communities. And again, it's not exhausted. So there's players doing and they do do this on the nflpa channels where they celebrated a lot of the community work. But it's really important because I think you get a sense of how much these players do do do in their communities and how important they are to that community. As a spokesman, as somebody who has money, has influence. So for us we pitched the NFLPA to do a campaign with them and the the idea behind it was that every players a superhero. We were going to create sort of a toy box that you would really think this is an actual marvel toy. That was in the box and we did the packaging around it and it looks very realistic. We nailed the likeness of the players and the NFLPA loved it. It gave it a cohesive, comprehensive look throughout the season and we got some surprises coming out the next couple weeks. Make sure you were this idea came from. Yeah, those are those are dope. I've been seen. We did you guys do it last year? To it was a just this year. No, we didn't. So this yeah, this is the first year and we really, we really wanted to do something special. Yeah, and alix showing a package now of Captain America and the box right on each side, so the the cover has like the the athlete and then on the the size of the box actually has sort of the details and information about what they did in the community and it was really challenging, right, Elliot, like to find the superhero that match kind of what they were doing and dropping and by the way, of Pete, behind the curtain we had to turn this thing around within like forty eight hours. So it was a it was a lot of work. It was tremendously rewarding to see the reaction from the NFLPA, see the reaction to the players. The five finalists for the Allen Page war got announced and the winners going to be announced soon, I believe. I'm February ninth, and we have a surprise for that winner coming. So stay tuned to a heart link group on our serve journalism like, okay say on this podcast. I'm so well, there's there's going to be a there's going to be a cool thing for the winner and and you know, again, this goes back to our whole philosophy of yes, we want to create cool shit. At the end of the day, that's our objective. But it's always a bonus when you can celebrate what athletes are doing the community. It kind of goes back to my original statement. So yeah, this has been one of the fun ones and working with an organization like the NFL, NFLPA and the NFL has been has been pretty awesome. Can I just expand upon with that? So, so what happened was they wanted like a common book look and we were like that's great, but that's been done a million times. And I came back and I'll talk to Joan about it and I'm like, when I was at Turtle Beach, we made the superhero headsets and we told the story but behind the the you know, character or...

...the movie that was a part of, and also the head set itself. So I was like, what if we tell their story with this side thing? And it's like that's what Joan and I are so good at. We always want to find a visual way to tell the story. You know these as well. If you look at an image and it's and it doesn't tell a story to me, then you've you lost. You lost me. You gotta find a narrative with the images. What we did for the PODCAST, you know, we always wanted to tell some kind of story or her NFDS. We're telling her story of her career with with visuals. Yeah, for sure. Yeah. Well, I mean you guys could say, because I'm not going to be released it till after February, knife if you want to. Yeah, it's going to be a physical physicals figures, so I thought, and that's why I wired. Yeah, I mean it's not much for that. For that, we're making a D store where you go into the store, you see the aisles with all the toys and then you go down and then there's a there's a, you know, a shelf that's hidden and then the shelve's going to go up and it's going to release the the toy. But you have to see this toy store it. We got a D artists to do it and it like. It looks like a picture of a real store. It is insane. This guy is amazing and we have to say too, and again it's not just because we're on your podcast, but the the work we did with renee and you. You know, we did an illustration and animation every week for the episode getting to highlight some of the amazing guess that you guys have on the podcast, and that was amazing too, because, again, the exposure. We talked about social media. You guys tagged us, you celebrated us on social and we had really great working relationship and to showcase what you can do with a podcast in the content that comes out of it is always been something that we've been passion about too. So the work we did with you guys is always something that we share with others and celebrators as well. Yeah, and if with clients, and you know, you and renee have been awesome and, you know, so supportive of us. That's really important to me. Like you know, somehow I drag this guy along with me and used to be my client. But the other thing that I loved about working with her is all the stuff that she's for social you know, whether it's social justice or women's sports or women's you know, just helping women, you know, be more active in the community and stuff like that. We love that. We're all about that. We're really proud of what we've done for the Premiere Hockey Federation, which is awesome because they're the first woman's league not to have a W in it, or working with a commissioner there tie. She's awesome. We able to brand the all star Game New teare. We're going to do the championship game as well. It's really cool to have people play on your artwork, you know, like I can, you know, make make a make marks on your artwork with there were the skates, so I'm sure that was a buck list for you to check off right there. Oh, definitely, definitely, but I just I love being a part of the revolution for, you know, or evolution, whatever you want to call it, for Women's sports. I think it's it's awesome to see that the WNBA is, I mean it's still so young. It's still only twenty five. Who or twenty five years now, and how it's becoming, you know, on the level with with these big boys sports, you know, for the men, and I think it's leading the way for these premiere hockey federations and stuff like that to say, Hey, we're as exciting to watch, we're, you know, we're as passionate, if not more passionate, about our sports. So, yeah, it was. It was really cool working with you guys, especially with her, as she's so passionate about everything that she does. Yeah, definitely, and I mean, I know I don't, I wish I kind of seen your guys behind the scenes, because we didn't know who we were getting. Like, guess why? We were just doing this all like independently, getting the guests, like reaching out, like I was just like I was like I was kind of surprised, like these people are just saying yes and like I felt like I just kept again like crazier and crazier like each week of who we were getting on. So that was that was that. That was just crazy. And then, yeah, going to the the PHF. Yeah,...

...it's cool to see that you guys were working with them too, because I actually work with Anya Babolino now on your packer and Madison Packer. I work with Madison, her wife now, because I work with Anya when she was a player like five years ago and now I'm working with her wife. It's she's like one of the one of the best players in the league, five time all star, the going. I think she's only five time all star. So yeah, it's dope to see the evolution be the whole leak. Yeah, yeah, now they're getting the money, which is, yes, you know, long time coming, and you see the the investments that that were just made in the WNBA. It's just a start now. But what we're hearing from brands and other partners surrounding this is that there is a movement to showcase that the female sports not only showcase but fuel them with the money that they need right like to get on par with where the men are, and the ratings are proving that that is sustain a sustainable and be find financially beneficial to the partners. That can't be this. Well, you know, the Women's sports don't get the Rais. Well, we've seen it with the final four and the women's Tournament and we've we're seeing it now with like what Phf is doing and making some headway there. So it's pretty exciting stuff and I know some people, you know, feel like hey, this should have happened a long time ago, and I totally agree. But to see now at least a full push with it and and our ability, hopefully to play a small role in the creative process has been has been pretty cool. Yeah, definitely. That's why. I mean, I don't know if you guys seen it as well, like when I post like women stuff like it gets more engagement than the men's stuft on my solios. I don't know if you, if you guys seen it, but like or more interactions to just with their fans and supporters, Khf, for sure. Yeah, I following their engagement since we started working with them. I'm like wow, this audience is really into it, the really connected and I think in some ways that's a better relationship than maybe we're seeing with some of the other big time sports, mail generated sports. With the NFL and the NBA, it's the disconnect is large. You know, when I worked with the timberwolves it was it was small time in the sense that they didn't have, obviously the fan base that that the Knicks do, but some of the things that they were able to do to connect to the community on a daily basis and the players were more accessible. It's honestly sometimes a better fan experience and I think a lot of these sports are finding that they can connect better with their audience and their fans and and I think that's going to be proven over time that it could be financially more lucrative for them and also from social content creation and connection, you can really really get fans involved in a way that at the big league just can't do it. And if t's started slow with women's for them, then it's started to explode, you know. So I think it's all connecting and that the to you know, revolutions or revolutions are going on at the same time. And again I think that we're ready for a real explosion or probably already going through it. But yeah, now, definitely, and I want to go back to someone because I didn't even know. Maybe it's might be embarrassing since I did work. Are you guys? I didn't even know the heartland group. That what you said. It was heart and talent. So could you explain more how you guys came up with that name? Yeah, well, we went through two so we've we've branded ourselves within two weeks. Keith came up with that name. I will give him that credit. That's the most creative thing he's done for us. Wow, hope he doesn't listen to this. He's more operations, but now he's a very creative guy too as well, and I will give him that was awesome. Like he and I'm not even can I say the name that I had certain Nah, and I started doing the logos for that and and and you know, it just didn't feel right. And so when he came up with hey, we should...

...do heartland first, there was healing, which I didn't and I was and I will say I said we got to put the whole heart in it, so you know, and it the logo is just an hdt across, but it became this like x whorts crossing a cross and it get has this energy and I made the colors red and orange, obviously for heart and town, but also I wanted to be a phoenix. So it's actually our mascot, which maybe one day I'll actually draw or whatever is, is an actual Phoenix, because it's like rising up, rising up from covid. You know, we came from marketing see that made a lot of cuts during covid and we we wanted to have build a different kind of we're not an agency, we're a group, we're a collective, because, you know, when you have this sense of agency, I think that there's a lot of baggage that comes with it and a lot of expectations that you have to be a certain way, and we don't want to be that way. We want to be someone that people really like to work with, that we're not pushing stuff in your face. We're trying to work with you, collaborate with you, work with the best people that bring on, people that that make the most sense for the project, whether it's working with a diverse artist or working with an artist that's a specific skill, you know, stop motion or d animation or whatever, or when we work with renee on the MTS, we wanted to have people represented from all over the world you know, all different backgrounds, different sexes. That's in the these you know everything. So so, yeah, you know, we're always trying to find what the what the best solution for the project is, and I don't think you get that with big season. Yeah, I think it's more like the bottom dollar. How do you figue this out to make the most money? Did know for sure? What about like, what advice would you too give to like a young creator coming up? I mean, you know, it's social media. Social media isn't still very important? And keep posting, even if you get two likes on a post. I kill myself on one if I don't get much engagement. But it, but it's it. Did you hurt yourself? If you, if you do that, just keep on, keep on, keeping on, keep on making our keep on posting it, keep on getting it out there. Someone will see the best work does were tend to rise to the top. I would say take advantage of the tools. It's a pretty incredible how many tools are available a for free or a fairly low cost, and you can build a studio in your apartment for not that much money and you can create pretty high quality type of content. And I think that you know find out wood it is that you would either what you want to say or what you want to be or what you want to create, and lean into it. Don't try to do too much in the beginning, you know, but every day continue at you know, we talked about the podcast and we talked about a little bit earlier before we jumped on started recording. But it's one of these things like a lot of people drop off. I think I forgot what the statistic is, right, but most people don't make it past like ten episodes or even maybe less than that. Right. There's there's a pretty substantial number and it's to me it's one of those things like just keep doing it. You're going to evolve with the content. It's not going to be perfect the first time. Nobody is. It's never, is right. But if you try to wait it out and say no, I'm gonna wait till this is perfect before I go public, I don't want to get made fun of, I don't want to you know, I'm worried about what people do. It'll never happen. It will just never happen and you're going to lose time and times going to pass you by. And so I would say four creators out there, start putting out their start. You know, try, try to have the things, try different platforms. What works best for you. You know, the worst thing you can do is feel like there's some sort of negativity coming your way and then and then you just stop and getting up. If you continue to go, you'll get better. You know, I taught myself video editing. I was not going to beginning, but I've continued over and over and over and over again, and you get to a point where it's things start to click in a different way and then you start finding...

...solutions of how to do things and different ways to tell stories. So we're an amazing golden age of creators and I'm blown away by some of these kids, and I can say kids because I'm old now, that are doing awesome, awesome work. And if you're out there and you're like I want to start, my biggest piece of advice would be just go and don't look back. Keep going. I gotta jump in a minute, but I just want to reiterate on top of him. I think it says a lot of about our relationship that and and it says a lot about you, Paul, because you've kicked our ass but we're going to hit our fifty episode on. We need to be doing that, which is a plug. If people want to come through it all will be on. We need to be doing that soon enough. And you know, most people to do three episodes. We got two. Fifty, Paul, you're at five hundred or whatever. But you know, it just shows a testaments. And you know, same thing with renee, like we got through a whole season and now she got picked up. You know, like you never know, like with podcasters, to keep going and go to fifty episodes and see if you get picked up by someone, because you might. Just it's it's not just the it's not just the work, it's the wors ethic that you put behind it and it's the consistency. Keep at it all right, Jonah. So how did you guys end up starting your podcast? I know you guys have, I think Elliott just said, almost fifty episodes. Yeah, yeah, we're at fifty episodes. It's actually a really funny story. Keith Elliott and myself went to a nets game to together and this we're at the marketing agency and we there's ideas. Everybody's like, I want to do a podcast, I want to do a podcast. I'm like, guys, we do have time do it, the resources, like I'm going to be editing it. It's IT'S A lot. That's a lot of work to do it. You know, the artwork to promotetion of it, everything that goes into it. And at the time we started to think about the idea and of a podcast and what the name would be. Elliott always says like I would. I send them often like hey, look at this piece of content, look at this cool like video that this guy did or this artwork, and his reply all the time, and this is a text thread with Keith Elliot Myself, is we need to be doing that. So it's never like hey, like, let's talk about that, how that would it's like we need to be doing that. Everything is we need to be doing that. So we started joking around like that. That is the funny sort of way of approaching all this context, because it's like never ending and we just got to do everything so that we said, listen, it's a long name. I don't necessarily a Cristo. It's something that you should do to have that kind of long name for a podcast Tyle, but it just made so much sense and then, you know, for us to bring on people in either the marketing world, athletes, content creators, you know, people in business of all walks of life. It's been really cool and it's sort of under that umbrella of like we like to listen to people and successful people and say to ourselves, well, we need to be doing that too. So that's how it all started. And Yeah, now we're fifty episodes deep and and just the most, and I'm sure you you feel the same way. There's something about a podcast. You bring on strangers and at the end of thirty, forty minutes after you almost feel like you're friends with them and there's a connection that's been made. And and since I've been doing content, you know when I was at at the timber was the Knicks, I've always enjoyed interviewing people. It's one of my favorite things to do and one of the things I kind of missed being a way from the team. But it's really been awesome to have these conversations on podcasts. And you know, I think for people out there, if you're marketers or digital creators, we bring on a lot of smarter people than us to talk about these things. So you know, we need to be doing thatcom there a lot of very conversations there, so feel free to dive in and get some some free tips and information. Didn't know. That's exactly how I feel too, just like interviewing somebody and then, just like you, kind of, I actually like interviewing people that I don't know because, well, most of the time, sometimes, I mean I've definitely had some bad ones, I guess, but some some interesting experiences. But Um, but yeah, like that's why it's like cool to just connect with people in general, and...

...that's like the reason why I started one was just because I like to listening to them and I was like, I know all these people, like going to interview them and tell their stories, and same thing, like I like interviewing like all different types of people, not just like athletes. And Yeah, I think it's just a just a cool thing to do. And now I love I love your guys as a name, even though it is long, but I think it's funny because I feel like a lot of it could resonate with that. Yeah, yeah, for sure, it's something that it's you know, it's like that anything and it's funny a look weird way about like everybody's kind of chiming in about the commanders, the watching the commanders around. I don't really necessarily like the name, but it I think it will becommon name. People will then say like Oh yeah, the commanders, that's it, just like Washington football team was like I don't know about that, that's weird, and then also it was like no, I kind of like the watching football team. So it was that way with we need to be doing that. It wasn't necessarily something that I was like, I don't know if it's catching up for a podcast, but it's certainly explains sort of the dynamic between the three of us. So it's been cool so far. Well, I appreciate you guys coming on and I could do with the listeners or where you can follow you guys out and find you. So you can find us a heartland, at heartland, so that's, you know, heart, and then eliant, or you can find me at at Elliott Gerard on twitter and Instagram. Same with Partland. So that's Elliot Grrd. I'm sure you'll put it in the notes. And you know, heartlandcom or we need to be doing thatcom is where you can find us on the podcast. Yes, and you can follow me at Jonah Ballo Jo and Ahba l low, and it's heart link group. That is real. Find us on twitter, instagram, Haart eliant group. And don't listen to Elliott. Let me guide you to the places to find us, heartlandcom and Paul. Thanks again so much. Brands say to blast. This is a blast. Yeah, boom,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (173)