Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Gillian Robertson | Average To Savage EP71

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the seventy-first episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring UFC fighter Gillian Robertson. Paul Guarino talked with Gillian Robertson discussing her upbringing, how she got into MMA, and her upcoming fight vs. Maycee Barber. Follow Gillian Robertson https://www.instagram.com/savage_ufc

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Garno, everyone in anyone, athletes set's and much more. It's up everybody. I'm back for another episode of the average savage podcast. Our special guests today is UFC flyweight Billian Robertson, who is currently seven and three. Thanks for coming on. How's it going? Thank you so much for having me. Doing great today. Just, you know, getting into camp. I think we're five, six weeks out of now, so getting close. Yeah, definitely, definitely. And I know you're born in Canada, so how did you get involved in mixed martial arts? At the very beginning? I have no idea when I first started. I started with a cardio kickboxing cause and Portulity, Florida, Dean Thomas as Jim, and I don't really know what drove me to it. For some reason, I was sixteen. I just wanted to try kickboxing. I just had it in my mind that that was a thing. So I went and I tried to kick boxing cause Jim and obviously I just kind of found the right place because I'm still with that the same coast to the day, Dean scorning me in the UFC. But yeah, I don't really know how I got into it. I just kind of fell into it. Yeah, we're about like growing up. Did you play in the other sports? No, I'm actually my least was at least as professional athlete. That I know, because I've never played a sport in my life really like growing up. I volunteer with animals a lot. So I've owned here at the main society or at a horse rescuer, at a wildlife rescue and yeah, and never my parents put me in soccer. They put me in gymnastics, but I dropped out like in a couple months because I just didn't like it. I was never athletic. figure out that's yeah, that's pretty funny. I know you said You mengined. You told me before this interview. They you only live in Canada until you were seven years old, but is there like anything that you miss about like living in Canada? I had folutely love it up there. Even though I only live there until seven, it still feels...

...like home to me. So like my grandparents are up there and just going up and visiting, seeing the falls, it's just I love everything about it. And you try out America top team in Flora. So what's happen like, because I know it's like one of the top gym's and America. It's an absolutely crazy experience being able to train in a place like America top team. We have literally all the best females in the world and a huge group of one hundred and twenty five pound guys as well that are fighting at the highest level. We it's like when I was growing up, like I said, I started at a small view of course, a Lucy and that Jim. Like we didn't have all the training partners, we didn't have as the group of like ten to fifteen girls or a hundred and twenty five pound guys. All we had was like heavy wait guys for me to work with. So it's like you end up working with everybody in the room when it's just it's nice to have bodies that are your size and you get more of a similar look as to what you'll see in a fight. Yeah, and going going into your first like amateur fight, what was that like? The real way to describe that feel like walking into the cage for the first time. It's it's an absolutely insane see and I guess you don't really know what you're getting yourself into it, but like walking out of the cage, I just remember like the second I walked out, I was like, I want to do that again, I want to get back in again. This is quick as fuse. So like it was just so much fun. You literally remember nothing walking out. There's just so much adrenaline. Every moment goes by so fast, but it's just it's such a rush. It's there's nothing I love more than that. Yeah, so you went. You went eight and one as an amateur. So I mean you went. I think you would. You go on like a you're on a crazy wind sting at the end. It was that like the decision. It was the decision for you turning thro I just listened to my coach. Whenever he said I was already, I was ready. I'm so thankful that I had so many amateur fights. I...

...feel like having that experience is put me in a good place coming into the UFC. Like I got signed when I was three and two, but obviously I had so much a meager experience. I feel like I was still at the level of that of the girls that I was surrounded back but and obviously for you that since I've gotten the sea guy before finishes. But it's just whenever my coaching Thomas said I was right, I've always listened to him. I started in Florida. You came fight until you're eighteen years old. So I had my first amateur fight when I was eighteen and then I believe I turn pro just before my twenty one birthday. Yeah, I forgot you. And and what do you think the like? The biggest difference been from like amateurs to the pros? Not A lot. Going from going from the amager seem to the low level pro team, there's really not a huge difference. It's so fighting unlike the same kind of level show. You're not getting paid a lot of money, so you're still probably working a part time up and it's like my first couple fights I was getting paid five hundred, five hundred, six hundred sixtend. I think I got four and for one two. It's like you can't live off that money. So the difference from me an amateur to a lovel pro is a lot. But once it made it to you have see them, that's when the change of started happening. Definitely. What about I know your first fight was a loss. Was that like? How did that take like pressure off you taking the first loss, like in a positive way. I guess you can spend it. Yeah, because honestly, it's like I obviously I had two awesomes when I got came into UFC, but my first, sauce, was a close decision and it's like I knew that it was a really close fight. It could have went either way. My second loss, I took every again, sindacove. I took the fight on five days notice, so it's like I kind of had excuses for...

...myself, and those boss a little bit. Is I feel like my first real loss, it hit me hard, was whenever I got finished, first in the tough house and in the but that one is still didn't go on my record, and then whenever I got finished for my one UFC lost. That was the hardest loss I've ever taken in my life because, like the first two, I was upset, but it's like they were so close fights. There were so or I took that fight on five days notice, so it's like I still had justifiable reasons. But this one, when I took my first loss in the UFC, that's that's the hardest loss I've ever taken and I tried to get over it so much that every single morning when I woke up, me tapping was the first thing I will I thought of in the morning. That took the count, you know. Yea. And how did you get casted for the Oldimn fire? They had a try out, so they actually had trial. It was supposed to be for one hundred and fifteen and one hundred and thirty five and the last minute they decided to change it to one hundred and twenty five, which is perfect for me, because I was just getting to the point where I couldn't make one hundred and fifteen any more. Or on my fight outside of you see you at one fifteen. So this is the point where it is that I really couldn't do anymore. They decided to have the one hundred and twenty five. I auditioned for it and I guess they liked me, so they decided to pick me and used Bay for the show. Got You got it. Besides like the actual like fighting, did they like interview to see like if you have like a good personality and stuff like that too? They feel more personality than it is skilled. Almost about I think like two minutes had work and then they watch you grapple for two minutes so they can really get like minimal skill well off of that, and then after those two minutes they make their first cut and then you go to the interview rooms and they make more cut after the interviews...

...and then after that they'll keep people there all week so they'll get they're going to keep just the last to cut really and then they're going to cut a little bit more after that. But it's based out of interviews. The last two times there's nothing to do with skill. After all they do is watch you train for four minutes. The skill they watch. Yeah, I mean that's crazy, but I mean that's definitely seems like realistic, just because obviously they want the show to be like drama field and stuff like that. If people watching and going back to like the ultimate fighter when you're on the finale, like so that's like a UFC event. was that like a different feeling when you were fighting for the UFC, like your first UFC fight? Yes and no. I feel like being a little socided finale kind of took the pressure of a first UFC fight away for me. Whenever I thought my cannon Liverpool, that almost felt like more like the real search UFC fight, because I going into the finale is like you don't have your fight kit. You're you're still in the team. Show like it. They still all have like your fistial py it with your name on it. You don't. I was fighting emily with my who I literally we shared the same bunk bed for six weeks. So it's like you're fighting someone your friends. So it's almost like it brings like that kind of Jim Feeling to it. That kind of comfort makes it almost easier. I really didn't. I feel like the fact that my UFCB was with the Tuffa House. I feel like it just took a out of pressure up me Goja. And then after that fight, was that when you have C signed? You technically I was. That was my first UFC fight, so I was sign before I signed my six eye contract before that fight. Yeah, so after that then I think I've been on the too long of a leave schedule. So I've been fighting about every six months since then, but thankfully this one came sooner than that. Yeah, see,...

...you like to active. Oh yeah, I'd like to be in there is often as possible. This is always do is. So I said my time doing so the more I can get in there, the better. Good you think it's like? I mean, you were only basically one year into a proper and you already signed with us. Feeling, did you think that was like surreal? It's still surreal to me. It doesn't feel real like this is literally my job, this is what I get to do for a living, that I get to go out there and fight and do exactly what I love, and every single time I go to fight, every single time I'm putting on that Pike, it just feels a hundred percent surreal me. Can you take me through, like what one of your camps is like in what it's like to cut weight typo cream? I'm training around so I'll be training two or three times a day when I'm out of camp and then three to four times a day when I'm in camp, and it's just really a lot of drilling more than anything. I feel like I strive technically, so I'm not necessarily like very strong or explosive fighter, but I am someone who is gonna out tech me people. So I just focus a lot on drilling, technique, type me technique, getting in like Dean Thomas Hill Game Plan for me. So we look at what we want to do for this next fight and then I just drill it into my head and I'll just do the streame thing over and over and over and as boring and repetitive. But wednesby fight, what keep what keeps you motivated during like camp? I feel like I wout a camp as hard of the same motivate is motivated than in camp, because the second I get an opponent's name, then I have a focus. I have someone that everything on mine I'm thinking about. I have a goal that I want to hit, I have something that I'm driving towards. But when I'm out of care, if that's when it's like it gets hard to pay focus, it gets hard to want to train two three times a day because you don't have that in next target yet, you don't have that...

...next focus. So that's, I feel like, another reason why I like to stay active as possible. Definitely makes sense right there. And you got you're got a fight coming out October eighteen versus macy barber and Boston. How do you see that fight? Point out, I feel like no matter what, I have the gate same game plan for every single on my fight. I'm going in there and it's just a race to get to the back, see how blast I can get there. So I'm going to go in there, take your down and just I'm always hunting for the back and I think I get the CKO before that and that's what happens. So like when you when you go into a fire, are you always thinking like you want to get to finish? A hundred percent. I'm I get the pay. I get paid the same if I'm in there for five minutes or fifteen minutes. So I'm trying to get in and out of there as quick as possible, take as little damage as possible and try to get back in the one. Definitely and going too, like the pay gap between the men and the women in the UFC. Haven't seen a lot of things in boxing to and going back and forth. So what would what's your take on it? I feel like it's a love say. Feel like it's less prominent in the USC as it is in other sports. I feel like in boxing and is definitely and any other sport you look at is definitely a lot more prominent and I feel like they separate the men too women's divisions a lot more where in the UFC. Really, if you have that star power, you have the potential to make that money. You have like you see round the rousy she was getting paid more than a lot of the men and it's just because she had that star power. And I feel like if you have that, you have the skill, you have the the ability to talk in from the camera, then you have the ability to pay this not like there's UFC in a WC. There's the NBA and WNBA. It's just the UFC gray. Good points, good points. And what advice would you give to like a young up and coming fighter? No matter what, you gotta stay active. You just got...

...to stay in there and keep it going, keep on working and take every opportunity that comes to is, I feel, like a lot of people, though, like a lot of younger fighters. He'll be certain I saying, Oh, I can't get a fight, I can't find an opponent, but they're turning down fights for they're coming to him. You just got to accept the opportunities that come to you. The definitely good advice and are ready for some fun questions. are going to go from average to savage. Definitely. How'd you get the nickname? The savage is actually after my first amateur fight. My coach team Thomas, wrote an email about me to my whole team and he was talking about how I was quiet as announce but when I walk out the cage I turn into a savage. And then after that fight, ever was like, Oh, you see that an't I guess it is kind of caught on after that. All right, we're about what's your favorite Song Right now? Oh, that's a tough fun. I don't really listen to music. No music, not even like before you train or work out. No, I feel like a lot of times it's quiet when you fight. I try to train quiet. What we usually train on the quiet, because it's like have music playing while you're fighting. Yeah, true. All right, what about top five favorite fighter? Top Five favorite John Jones and Ananuda's you're just definitely up top their goats, no matter what. I feel like no one is more skilled. Like there's no more skilled male, there's no more skilled female. Next, I think I gotta throw in ideas they too, because I just the huge man is well, another one my teammates. I guess he wanta home j check guys. I get to train with her...

...a lot and there's no one who really inspires me more by their push. I feel like she's just like you train with her and you understand why. She's a world chimp and she's just a monster. She's just got a drive that never stops, if she has absolutely no quit in her. And then one more. I guess not now, but Connor McGregor, it is drive I was, I feel like. I feel like connor was a technique with the way he could talk, in the way he could fight. If there was no one smarter. And obviously he's last year's he's gotten his whiskey business, everything going, he's got all the money, he doesn't have to fight anymore. But there were he had that drive and he had this smart to be the one of the tops, one of the greatest. You know that. You brought him up. You think he's going to fight again, either in botching or a him? Honestly, that's a really tough question. I don't feel like he has a reason. Do you know? He has so much money, he has so many other ways to make money now he doesn't really have to fight and especially be to be able to fight at the highest like she's not going to be able to keep up with these guys like a babe or Dustin, who are training at re single day. This is their life, this is all they do. They don't have a whiskey company, they don't have a something like that. You know, this is like. All they do is train. They're looking for that bell and he's not going to be able to cope with those guys unless you to spend that time in the gym and really focuses on himself and really starts putting the work at definitely. Definitely. And last one, what do you like to do when you're not training? Time at the dog park. He's my best friend. Oh yeah, I forgot. I always see that on your stories and stuff. I adopted him when he is about six or seven years old, but the main society and I've had them for about five years now and then they he's just he's the best. Do you have any other pets? No, he's...

...my only one. Gotcha. All right. Well, I appreciate you coming on in. Good luck October eighteen, and could you let the fans know where they could follow you at? If you want to go ahead and follow my sponsors at twar Britain, fresh, fresh, fit mail plans and creating better day, CBD and follow me at savage underscore UFC on twitter and instagram, and then watch me get my Han's on October eighteen. There you go, perfect appreciate it. I think he's much for having me.

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