Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Greg Gurenlian | Average to Savage EP86

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the eighty-sixth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring former PLL & MLL player and entrepreneur Greg Gurenlian. Paul Guarino talked with Greg Gurenlian discussing his time at Penn State, his MVP season in Major League Lacrosse with the New York Lizards, his experience in the new Premier Lacrosse League (founded by Paul Rabil), and the evolution of lacrosse throughout the years. Follow Greg The Beast Gurenlian https://www.instagram.com/gregbeast32 Podcast interview with Greg Gurenlian originally recorded January 30, 2020

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Greno everyone in anyone, athletes, so ebs and much more to up everybody. Welcome back to the average savage podcast. Or special guest today is newly retired Pro Lacrosse player Greg Grimly, and it's up. Greg has going. Appreciate you coming on the show. Doing well. Thanks for having appreciate it. Yeah, so I know he recently retired from prolacrosse. Could you give me a reason why and why you thought this was the right time? Yeah, I mean it was mostly family. My I had been on the road every week another summer since two thousand and six and I've known my wife since then and she's been a good soldier for years. I was originally going to retire from Prolacrosse in two thousand and seven, two thousand and seventeen season, and when the pll came out it was like too good of an opportunity to be part of, so we agreed that I would do it for one year and then that would be it. So yeah, I mean it was mostly because of family. I feel like last year every game I played in except for one, and I tried to play with the point Hams during I was over the percent. I was doing well against guys that are ten to twelve years younger than me. So, like I said, had puny a juice up in the tank. But at some point you have to make decisions. And my son is now, know, three, and you know, he's old enough where he realizes when I'm gone and it's about time for me to be all a little bit more. So that was just the right thought. Yeah, definitely. Now, I know you guys knew that you were retiring after one year to like at anybody else the PLO, and you know, we knew inside the PLO. Okay, the group of deal was going to be that it was going to be one year and then we're discussed like some kind of transition which were discussing right now. Still going to be part of the PL and I'm still going to help with some capacity. We're just trying to figure out exactly what I can be most useful doing. And then, yeah, going to the PLL. What did you what did you think when like Paul Rabel and crew started to found that and in like the first year, obviously, was last. Was it last? Yeah, last, all right. Yeah, I heard rumblings of it I know because I played with Paul and the other league and then we played on Tmus Ay together for two thousand and eighteen. So I know. I remember him kind of raising money and talking to people and we all knew it was going to be a thing. And then the real stunner was when, over night, when he announced it, like a hundred and fifty guys left the other league and just like sign with pll and that was when it was like okay, like we all trust that this is going to be a good thing. So everyone just didn't even hesitated, just left and we were like holy crap, like this is going to be the future. So we I know Paul well enough to know that he never just kind of...

...goes for something, like he puts a lot of playing, a lot of effort, a lot of learning into something. So I feel like it was indicative, and I remember telling him this is indicative of what we think of you. You you know, people will follow you because we trust that you and your brother have a plan. So it was pretty cool to say yeah, they're going going back into time. How did you get into Lacrosse? I started playing Lacrosse in right before my freshman year of high school because that was like a cool sport and Sprinkl doller county like that is the sport to play in high school. All the cool kids like. So back then I was like wow, if you were one of the cool kids, rocking like the game day shorts like the school or whatever like that was the coolest thing you can do. A football team wasn't good. We really had many sports that were really good, but our LACROSSE team's legendary. So I wanted to play. So I tried it. I it's a while to get good at it. I almost quit at one point because it was just such a very frustrating sport to try to jump in late, especially when you're surrounded by a guy's a good playing since they're like six. But I mean I'm obviously paid off. But you know, other's certain moments where I definitely wanted to give up and there were certain people that put the arm around me at the perfect time and said the right things to me to make me stick with this sport, because it is frustrating to get going on it. And did you, did you play any other sports row on it? Yeah, the first I mean I the first activity I started was karate when I was when I was six and I did that for ten years. But I did wrestling, I did basketball, I did soccer, baseball, I did everything but football and hockey pretty much. So, you know, I actually once I started getting going and really getting good at Lacrosse and my junior year high school that was the first year I didn't play free sports. I gave up on basketball so I could lift and train during the during the during that time of year. So I played three sports year round most of my life. You're going into that. Do you think that helped you, like in Lacrosse, instead of playing like instead of focusing on one sport? Because I know like that's kind of a big subject now, like Shit, kids just focus on one sport? Or should they play the sorts grown up? You know what? It's so funny because no doubt the playing other sports, he'll be with Lacrosse. But there's still different types of people that play Lacrosse. It's not like I was talking. I was just did the Nerd Dame coaches convention this past weekend or there's over two hundred and western and Lacrosse coaches and a lot of these guys come from football because it's still not quite hotbed like it is in east coast, and they all say the same thing like, man, I camera from football and I just love this game and I just think it's you know, it's just so cool how everyone wants to share information and, you know, so many different types of athletes can play it. And that's what I hear all the time because, looking basketball, that's what was the first sport...

...to go for me, because I was like, all right, I hit six one. That's as high as it's getting. And then I remember what you know, like when you look at football, it's like if you're not a freak athlete, you're not playing football. So, like with across, it's like you could have someone like me who's athletic and uses that to get in and then, like lets they're stick skills, catch up and could be a faceoff guy. You can be an attack with guys insane stick, but you don't have to be really fast. You can just have a great stick stills, text the ball inside and score. You could be a fast, saging type of player who has a ton of speed. You could be a guy who's really big on defense and put people down. Goalie's coming to all shapes and sizes. So I think the reason why cross is cool is because it is one of the few sports where I looked at and said, your success is directly correlated to the amount of time you're willing to work on your stick skills. You can't be great at this sport unless you are really good at catching and growing and doing things with your accosting. So that's what was so cool about it and I think that's why it's growing and I think that's why it's such a big deal. It's funny, you say that too, about this all athletes playing, because I remember when I was in high school I was pretty much just other other athlete. Just play Lacrosse as just like to just, you know, be act pretty much the there's a lot of hockey guys, a lot of soccer guys, stuff like that. Yeah, yeah, play soccer in the fall and then I got to hit people in the spring. Will across there like a great conversation. If for sure. What about like what was the recruiting process like for Lacrosse I coming out high school? Well, we're creuing was different back then because Lacrosse was the best players were very relegated to like long island, Philly and Maryland. So there were two recruiting tournaments back then. There was the camp camp, which was like, HMM, high schools and club teams used to put teams together and just go out and compete in this massive weekend tournament and if you made the All Star game at that, you're probably going to college. And then the big one was two hundred and five. That was an individual camp. You had to be invited to go and if you made the All Star game at that you were a hundred percent going to college. And I just remember I got significantly better over the course of my junior year and I went to those weekends and I made the All Star game at both of them and like overnight the letters just started flooding it. And you know, I had no concept, like I still had no concept of writing essays or applying to colleges or any of that stuff, because back then it was like you get recruited really hard your fall of your senior year, you make a decision and then you're like we go through a missions near going to college. And my whole family went to Penn State. My dream school was Penn State. My cousin, my aunt's uncle's I grew up on Penn State football. I could tell you every quarterback at Penn states. It's like nineteen ninety. So when I got a letter from Penn State, I knew nothing about the Lacrosse program. I...

...just knew that I got a letter from Penn state and I want to go to Penn state. So it was like overnight, it was like calling crap, here's my ticket to go to my dream school. So then I went on the recruiting visits just to see other schools, but I always kind of just had one leg over at I had one foot so on the Penn state pond and unless somebody shocked me, I was going to go there. So then when I'm visited and kind of just committed and my recruiting process was very streamline because Penn state was a school I grow up knowing, I would knew that I wanted to do study comisiology and Penn State had one of the best utility programs in the country. I know I wanted to be at a big football school. So like it was just it was the easiest recruiting ever for me. From that standpoint, I was very lucky. Nowadays, these kids are, you know, big, start playing club Lacrosse, where I'm like sixth grade. Recruiting coaches are keeping an eye on kids when there in eighth grade and then, you know, a few years ago kids were committing in eighth grade. It was nuts. Now at the new rules, after wait till September first of the junior to contact the kids and now it's coming down. But recruiting is nothing like it used to because kids are good from Michigan, Ido, Texas, California. There's a huge club recruiting tournament happening in every state every day. It's insane. So I don't know how coaches keep your eye on the ball right now. It's crazy. In the in the have the listeners into perspective. You were this was in the early start. Yeah, so I graduated high school in two thousand and two. Okay. Yeah, so obviously a lot has changed, especially with social media. Oh yeah, yeah, so that's part of it, right, is there are more ways to connect with people than ever and there are far more ways for you to get in trouble than ever. And definitely, you know, that's I think. I think this generation that's kind of finishing college now, or just like I would say this, the guys who were like four or five years out of school now out of college. They were the generation, unfortunately, that like they were still new to the instagram world and stuff and they were the ones making the mistakes. And now, talking to kids that are in high school now, like they've learned to be able to self regulate themselves, like they're like, you know, I have two groups of kids. I got kids that are like I go to a party and no one's let that to going out, and I go to parties and it's literally US sitting there watching TV because we're so scared we're going to do something though. So kids and like real self regulated themselves. Were looking at sports, because they know I am one instagram story away for my whole life going up and stook. So it's nuts. Now it's crazy. It's actually fun. You say that too, because I'm like this is, I guess, my six year out of college. So, but we didn't, we didn't have like when I was a junior, senior, I think that's when snapchat kind of like got big, but then we didn't have like instagram stories or direct message. Englich would have been crazy. Yeah, so like, yeah, I can imagine what college must be like. I'm only like, I'm only six year...

...out. I came in a Matt like it's probably insane. Yeah, I mean, I'm dating myself, but these book came out when I was a freshman college and I remember being like hold up, like we can talk to people in other schools and like it was nuts. And then all of a sudden, I remember one day everyone woke up in a panic because they're like, parents are on facebook, facebook, facebooks over everybody now. You just see, like you know, mom and aunts and uncles are all pop it up on facebook and everyone's purging their photos and it's just it was padding. Yeah, I mean, staying on the social media topic, I know you're huge on social media. That's how, actually, how I discovered you personally, like what, how did you have the self awareness that you could build your brand on social media? You know, it's funny. I I was so when I got out of college. I went to college by Strength Coach and I worked at times day for a year and I moved to New York City try to private sector and I started a company called bulk strength and I have a full book of clients as a strange coach, and I remember I got off of facebook during the two thousand and eight, I believe, election because I just had enough of people at that year. Everyone, every four years becomes a political efficient out him. So I just remember being like I don't need this anymore, like I'm going to leave my camp and I was off. I was off from social media until instagram started to really take off and I remember a couple of my clients being like you should get on the scene's so it's good for business, it's free advertisement. In fact. Then I was like had to pay for everything. Yeah, so I just started keeping track of my clients and around two thousand and twelve is when my career changed from playing Lacrosse one weekends and being a full time string coach to the face off academy came out and my my career on the field was really taking off and I was becoming more of a full time athlete. So we I sold Brolick and I moved into the face off thing and I started gaining a lot of followers and I remember my first real endorsement opportunity was with east coast guys and they were killing the youtube game back then. They were the first dudes and Lacrosse to like to sticking equipment reviews and their Mesh was awesome. Everybody was using their mess and their sticks. So I remember talking to them. I was like, look, like you're going to go to really get the biggest reach out of any company with new balance. All of them had nothing on these coas does, because they understood it early. So I got in with them and I following just explode. And as far as Lacrosse terms, for a random like a face office face off, guys were not popular positions back then. That's not a popular position. So for me to gain the following I had just by myself, with no nobody pumping my numbers for...

...me was huge and I really understood the power of it very early. Long and I think growing up in the facebook era gave me the perfect combination of being cautious online, but also I was old enough where I was mature enough to handle it and then realize like okay, let's break the numbers down and see how I could you know. So it becomes a full time jobs, you know right, like yeah, we bring kids in from facebook, I mean from college, and we hired the best coaches and I thought like kids just came out of college knowing the stuff, but you have to literally give them the crash forse, like you don't post at eleven am on a Tuesday when school you're you know, like you don't. You know, you don't post something and then argue people in your comments. Like there's a certain rules that you have to like remember and learn so that you can apply it and because this could consume you, as you know, like social media can totally backfire on you. So, you know, I had learned it as it went, but now I consider myself pretty good. Yeah, yeah, I definitely had some talks with some guys I work with it at it tell them like, yeah, you're not supposed to put this on there, because I was like if you ever blow up, or when you blow up, like someone could rip this and find this. And I mean I think you probably saw a lot of athletes, I think every on every year on NFL draft day, they come out, sting comes out and I'm just like this is this is crazy. I was like yeah, and you know what? It used to be that the due diligence was done by the NFL right during scouting, because you're investing now that due diligence is being done by everybody all the time. Like people are trying to dig up diret on everybody all the time. So any mistake you've ever made, no, people don't care who was when you were thirteen. Yeah, and I say all the time, I'm like I tell my buddies and like, could you imagine if every dumb thing that we thought we were able to throw out into the universe when we were like twelve years old, like we'd all be dead. It is no way are you know. So it's it's a whole different world now, but if you use it correctly, it's a very valuable tool. You just have to understand, appreciate and not take for granted the risks and the I don't want to say the evils that are involved, but it is kind of the thing that's out there right because people are trying to tear people down with by yeah, I mean that's why I think this next generation is going to be interesting because, like say, like kids, like maybe you're a meant your son's age like growing up. They're going to be grown up with full technology. So I think it could be like this could probably be one of the smartest generations, or it could be they might not be talking of the human interaction. So I don't. Well, that's the thing. The funny thing is a comedian actually just said this. He said WHO knew that the entire history of knowledge at our fingertips could make us stupider? Yeah, and it's crazy because we we do act helpless sometimes, like I'll have it, I'll post the thing and I kill ask me a question. That is literally the easiest thing to Google. Yeah, I love when I get the I get the...

DM's and I'm they're like, what's your website? Like, come on, it's in. It's in the man. I mean that's the other thing that I just had another guests on and I've I was like, oh, what's your email? And I was like, Oh, wait, never my going to check your thing right there, and he's like, he's like yeah, that's why he's like everything's even you can everything's out there and people aren't checking. It's like everybody's because everyone always asked me sometimes like how did I get this person? How I get it? I'm like it's literally just meashes them, DM them, sometimes their emails in the Bio. Just that's how I got you. Yeah, it's Dan. Every proper person who's doing what they should be doing online. has their contact like the way they prefer to contact, somewhere in there? Buy It. Yeah, so, yeah, exactly. and Go back to Penn State. What was your overall experience? Like they're it was the best thing ever. Like pen stay, it was the best place on her I loved it. I mean yeah, I mean we did it right, man. For me it was the perfect blend of, you know, being a division one athlete being having the freedom to kind of do your own thing. It would penn state wasn't you know, two thousand and Nineteen, two thousand and twenty, Penn State. Back then we were like a ranked eleven to thirteen teen every year, but we had the space to kind of like, you know, have our fun, but we had to go to work when we were or was time to go to work. And you know, obviously the class experience was amazing. I learned so much. My Mentor, who's our strength coach, she's he, you know, Brad Pant all was the best. So all the connections. I actually went back that shot all on my weekend. I remember they asking to speak and I was talking about my career on the field, my job, my wife, all the best things in my life I got from pen state. So you know, it's it's a real it's exactly. It turned out to be exactly what I expected at the day. And right now it's got to be fun. Football teams doing well, the basketball teams going a while, but the crosse teams ranking in the country. So if you're a sportsman and they're wrestling team is still a juggernaut. So like it must be fun. But yeah, it was a perfect school for me for sure. And you mentioned before you were working right out of Penn, say before you went into pro Lacrosse. Yes, I wanted to study caseology, but I wanted to be visit. I had like the coolest teacher ever, this this purvous in high school. She was the coolest and I was like man, she's the best job ever, like this is so cool and I'm ever going there. And after like the first Invester I was like wow, this is like really intense and I started to like talk to my advisors about like the job opportunities as a gym teacher. It's you really got to like strike gold to get a good said opportunity, like somewhere at a good paying job in the verbs or whatever. I just remember being like man, you know, and then I got really close to our strint coach and sounds like actually, this is kind...

...of great. I want to take that. I would love to learn the science of the human body and get into this. So, you know, I would literally, in between classes, go over the weight room and I would talk to him about like my neuro Adademy labs and stuff, and it was so intrinsic to me. I love everything about it. So that's after I graduated. He hired me immediately and I was going to become a gratuitist and I want to get my masters. And then it was just tough because you're not making any money. You know, you're basically this is your fifth year on campus and you know, I'm bouncing, you know, at the bar until zero am and then I'm going to work at thirty and I'm there until two and then, like, you can keep it. Also, at some point you after decide like do I need to go make money? So I took the chance and went to New York and it worked out great for me. So, you know, strange, training was my first love, for sure, and then going into like while you're in college, did you think there's a chance you could have proker. I mean I I'm assuming it wasn't as big as it is now. Yeah, you know what, man, I never knew. I never thought when I was in high school but I would be playing college across and I never thought in college I'd be playing pro. They even when I got the pros, I never thought I'd be playing for tea. I said, it's all happened. It's always I've always never look that far ahead. And you know, I started getting really good after my doing. Reason I got a shot at facing off my junior year for varsity because I was like kind of like a man down guy, or like a transitional defender, was because our strugger got hurt. So I went out there third game of the season and blew the doors off and then never look back. So it happened at a nowhere that like within a few months I would becoming a college prospect. And then when I got to college, added nowhere. My junior year I blew up and just had an insane year and then all of a sudden I get a note in my locker that the Nllo wants me to bring you to the draft that year. So then I go to the draft. In my first game, I get thrown in there and I have a good game. I like three points. I go seven for thirteen. I'm like home. I remember coming to a locker and like Holy Shit, I both Walker like I'm a professionally level player. This is incredible. And then, you know, after a couple of years of get my feet Darney for me, that's when I really took off. I blew my knee out in two thousand and eleven. And after I brew my knee out, I remember sitting on the cows and entire summer I'll bumped out like man, I really I didn't realize how much I loved playing like I just played on the weekends, but I think I could be really, really good at this. So I sat there and I actually applied what I know about buy any cats to the face off position and I created an entire training system. And when I came back after my Rehab, I applied that my next year and I set every personal record and I broke one of them. All records. So then I started training a couple kids and then they started kicking button and then my records to I kept setting records. Every year. I...

...would beat my record and I said, man, like I could. And this is like I figured something out, like I had this very important drive and I didn't care about anybody else's stats or anything, but I had the realization that I could probably be as good as I could humanly be at at something right. So, like you think about regardless of what anybody else is done, but your own personal like ability and talent, to be able to tap that out in something is what like became my obsession. So like face off became my full on obsession of I want to be absolutely as good as I can humanly be at this, and that's that's where everything just kind of went crazy. You got it? Yeah, I know you said you blew your knee out of two thousand and eleven. So how did you? How are you motivated come back from that? Honestly, it's because, like I'm such a science nerve and like like applying, because I was still training, like you know, I would crush down the gym, I would train my client from one leg. The being excitement putting a system together really got me through that. Like every day, my wife, like west or soul, like shoes. We were just eating at the time, to living together. She go to work, she come back. She'd take me to PC. Now this is a New York City, by the way, where it takes forever to get free boxing right. She would take me to the PTA. I would sit there and being absolute pain for an hour. She bring me back. So my nice sitting up, go back to work and I would sit there and I would just hammer out this system and I would just like I was measuring everything. I was measuring the distance to the ball, I was measuring the angled hips towards the ball and like that really got me going, like and I started making some videos of my brothers on Youtube just to see what people's reactions were. So I couldn't wait till I put that to full go because I was like hell that, like this is not how to stop playing Lacrosse. Like I'm going to come back. So I blew my knee out. It torm ACO, I tore meniscus and I had a microcrap show and I was back on the field playing at full speed and nine months, it's can that ensuing years when I broke my records. So you know, it was pretty awesome. And then two thousand and fifteen, I guess you'd say it was your best here. You won the MVP and you won the championship. So what was that? You're like that year was nuts. Man. That year was because it was a perfect combination of Ben tweaking the rules to get rid of a lot of the cheating that used to go and me having this system in place, and then also of me spending my first two full years of being a Lacrosse coach full time. So I was like dialed in and like I came back. I came out like I wanted to retire people that year and that there was a point at that all star break...

I was eighty percent. So it was it got really crazy and it was a blast and we won the championship and it was and then going to the USA team. What was that like to just rep the United States? Yeah, I mean right in the United States was I think that's all part of it too. Like two thousand and fourteen was my first gold team, say in the World Games, and lost the gold medal game in Denver and then like, I think three weeks later, we lost the ML semi final game in Denver and I was so just baked from that year and I was playing the entire summer with a torn labrom. So I remember getting labrom surgery and like I took a couple weeks off the rehab and then I was like, dude, I need to like blow the doors all the two thousand and fifteen, and I think that's part of it as well. But getting to the cool thing about playing with Teamosa in two thousand and eighteen was that was in my mind, because I really didn't know how real pl was yet. That was in my mind going to be the last time I played Lacrosse at high level. And not only did I get to play and when a gold medal, but I also got to play with trevor, who was like our first ever fa protege and he went on and broke every college face off or heard. So I get to be on a team that he and I had to face off guys and we're like twelve years apart and we know each other and now he works for us. It was a very cool experience for me. I loved it. It was amazing. In in your early years, did you have a I know you had your own business, but were you like working somewhere else too, like a just when I first yeah, when I first moved to New York, I worked at reebox sports club and the up West side, which is now known as it's an equinoce now, but that's where I started and that's where I really started to understand the private sector of strength training, because it's not like college. So that's where I really definitely the first gave me the first understanding of some marketing and branding and stuff like that. So when I created Brawlick, it really like made me understand what the pillars are of successful business and that's why when I sold it and we started doing the BA like, it was very easy for me to apply those things. And then I also had this social media tool with instagram and stuff, and I was like wow, I can do so much now with the knowledge I have from all that experience of building a brand already. What advice would you give to young player trying to get like ad one scholarship or trying to go pro? I tell them, I tell everybody the same thing, like your so, for instance, let's let's liken it to taking an exam. Right, your goal isn't to get an a and an exam, your...

...goal is to understand what you're going to be tested on. So thoroughly that there's nothing that can not be for a loop when you going to take the test. Right. So, like if I want to take a test on the human body, the muscles of the human body, I'm not going to go into the exam wondering how many muscles I need to know. I'm going to go into the exam knowing every single muscle because I need to know that anyway. So I'm going to know the whole thing so that when I go to take the test, that's just an extra step. I know I'll know I'll be well. And the same thing comes to when you're playing Lacrosse or you're playing a sport and you want to play at the next level. Don't focus on I want to play, who do I have to talk to to play College Lacrosse? Know your goal is to train and be as good as you can humanly be. Then everything else falls in place right like if you go and you find out exactly who you need to talk to to try to get a foot into a school that you want to go to, that doesn't help you nearly as much as it does by just going out training hard, being a good teammate and crushy people on the feeling. That's when the people come to you. So, you know, it sounds very elemental, but I think people forget that. But if you just go out and you do your thing, you work as hard as you can like your you will, you will, people will come from you. And it's the same thing in business. You know, like if you if you crush and you do your thing, you work as hard as you can at what you're doing and you don't care about what other people are doing, people will come to you for your business. So I think you know, it comes to recruiting and stuff, that's important. They are part of it. Is You know, there is a realistic component of once I'm ready and I'm starting to get people breaching out to need from recruiting standpoint. How do I organize? But I tell all my kids, when I was in high school, my parents this is the hardest thing for all our parents are staying. My parents were totally hands off. They're like, you want to go to college, all right, and go figure it out. So you're getting recruited. I'm not going to tell you where. It was cool you. You know. They expected me to do it, which I was all about. So my parents weren't. A lot of times I tell parents you're not going to get your kid recruited, but you can certainly get your kid UN recruited. So you know, if you call coach Billy at Ohio state and you talk his ear off, you're probably just going to annoy the coach. The coach wants to see your kid play, he wants to know what your kids like, he wants to talk to your kid. So my parents were off, hands off, and I charted my whole thing out, even though I do I want to go to Penn. Stay is like I charted every school. I rank them and then I literally listed their grades. So I was like, okay, as it a big school or small school, I want a big one. So now would rank that. You know, do they have CANC OBS? Yes, and now you know, and I would. And that's how you have to approach it, because it's if you want to be a man, you want to go and you want somebody invest money you to go do something, then you need to act like a man. You know or you know, or a woman. We have to beat a dual about it, and that's what I tell that's why I tell athletes all the time you have to take...

...it very seriously, because this isn't a Oh that team was on TV, so I want to be on TV one day kind of decision. This is a you're twenty two years old, you just graduated with a degree. Does anyone care enough to give you a job? That's what this is about, right. Like I tell my Lacrosse kids, I'm like, you're using the lacrosse stick to get you to a school that's going to get you a good job one day. This is not about trying to play on the ESPN. So, you know, maybe that's too much information, but I just feel very strongly about those parts of it. No, definitely, definitely good information. I mean in like you just said, you bet your wife at school to write. Yes, it was as a senior when I was working there. Yeah, Gotcha. Yeah, so, like that's why it's crazy, because how much college I when I talk to all of these athletes, how much college of really does play a big role because, like all the relationships they build from it. Yeah, and then going into your future now, now that you're retired, I know you said you have plans to work with the PLL. So, but what else besides besides that, like what else do you do? Non Yeah, so off, I mean my my biggest I mean you father. So I'm home during the day with Jackson take care of him. And then this year where, you know, we're going to open up some things, we're going to go full court press into kind of like we're creating more content than ever. So for me might be slab the videos on YouTube. If you go to youtubecom Greig grimly and I have like countless videos of training and breakdowns and stuff for kids to learn from. And then first class across with deemer class, him and I are doing instructional videos on his platform, a subscription based platform. We have our PODCAST, FA podcast face offs and friendships that we're going to do monthly on Youtube and on podcast APP for Apple. And then, hopefully things are in the works of the pll and you know, I'll be doing something with them on the social media front, breaking down more Lacrosse stuff in the boot, breaking down some stuff for them on social media. But I do like the commentary stuff. I had done my dabbled in the past. I enjoy doing color commentary. So I'll be doing some more that with black sports network and be sick. Yeah, it's awesome. Are you ready for some fun questions? are going to go from average to savage. How you how'd you get the nickname beast? Past nickname was given to me in one thousand nine hundred and ninety nine by my friend George as a joke, because I actually graduated high school about one hundred and seventy. I gained about ten pounds a year at Penn state and but I didn't know how to catch and throw when I first started playing across, so I just ran around trying to hear hold everybody. So all...

...the older guys would yell on the sideline like as a joke because I was a seedy kid trying to wrack everybody. So that's how I got it. What's your favorite Song Right now? My favorites, you know what, I'm going to be honest with it. I was just it's my wife yesterday, Halo by beyonce. It's my favorite song. What an absolute masterpiece. All right. What do you like to do when you're not training or playing Lacrosse? I actually am a huge nerd in the SCI FI world. I love reading more hammer and I'm on my fifty first novel right now with Warhammer. Forty K. I have no idea what that is, so I'll have to check it out. M No, I mean I like star wars and sci fi stuff, so I mean I would love this man. And then who'd you want to do? Like a you maybe haven't done with just lacrosse. Will do about will do a Lacrosse one, and then any sport. Um, a physical Jersey exchange with if I think td earland once he when he's a rookie this year. Okay, I think TV special. So you know, would be a good journey. Swell. And then my all time favorite athlete ever is Ray Lewis. So even getting to stand in the same room as in would be incredible. Got It. Yeah, would you like about Ray Lewis? Every single thing, everything. I read his book when it came out, like I just his story, his trials and tribulations, his leadership, his intensity. He's got. If you guys ever watched it, go on Youtube and watch RAY LEWIS RISE HD. It's the single greatest highlight video of all time. I've watched it before workouts like eight hundred times and you haven't got to meet him yet. I've never got to meet them. Yeah, I gotta try to make that happen, Dude. That would be the greatest single thing ever that's ever happened in the other than, of course, in America. Well, I appreciate you coming on. And could you want the people know where they could follow you? And then then he shout out you want to give her? Yeah, appreciate it, man. Yeah, Greg vs thirty two on twitter and instagram and then, as I said before, youtubecom slash craig grimly is by youtube videos and then, if you want to follow, if you're a lacrosse layer out there to face off, Academycom is where we do all of our instruction all the country.

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