Average to Savage
Average to Savage

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J Erving III | Average to Savage EP149

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and forty-ninth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring entrepreneur Julius Erving III. Paul Guarino talked with J Erving III discussing his career in business, working with artists such as Fat Joe, Tyga, Nelly, Lady Gaga, and investments he has made.  

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This podcast interview with J Erving III was originally recorded on June 18, 2019

...this is the Average to Savage podcastwith paul Guerrino, everyone and anyone athletes, celebsand much more. What's up everybody? I'm back for another episode of the averageSavage podcast? Our special guest today is J Irving J how's it going? Thanksfor coming on, I'm good man, thanks for having me. Yeah, I appreciate it. Solet's just jump right in saying what was it like to grow up as Julius,everything son? Um it was good, I mean there's definitely some uh some perks Ithink um you know, I think he was dead and I mean always has been dead to me.So you know, there was times in which we would go out and stuff, you know,people recognized him and you know, we knew that he was some kind of celebritybut it was very normal to us. Yeah, you got you, was there any moment when youwere like a little kid that you were like, wow, my dad's like famous um youknow when I think it was some of the people that I started to get to meet,when he would, you know, we go to like...

...all star games and stuff like that, themeeting like magic johnson and Isaiah thomas and larry bird, some of thoseother guys that felt like superstars at the time um you know in kind ofunderstanding that my dad was in the same classes though, you know, that'swhat kind of made it real. Gotcha, gotcha and jumping into like yourbusiness career, what was like uh let's just say like your first couple of jobsand then how did you get into the music industry? Um Well, my first couple ofjobs, like when I was still in high school, I worked at a used car lot andI did a bunch of internships on the summers when I was in high school. Andthen when I was in college I started doing street promotions for a companycalled loud records steve rifkin company and they were, you know, theleaders in the game in terms of hand to hand kind of street promotions at thetime. And I was going to school in Atlanta and in turn it with them,...

Gotcha. And uh, you're a manager toartist right now, correct? I'm not a distributor, I'm a distribution company.Um currently, So who are your first like clients are artists? You startedto work with um, partner with a guy named Troy carter pretty early in mycareer and you know, we were able to work with superstars really over theyears. Um Rodney jerkins, the flow of tree to eve and fat joe and the locksand nelly and months of others kind of back in the game Tiger and to othersand troy sign Lady Gaga in 2006. Uh we became one of the biggest artists inthe world. Um was that, was that like my gear breakthrough in the musicindustry, you'd say guy was Troy signing. I mean, I thinkit's all, I think all of, you know, every artist that we worked with, youknow, is, is a different and unique...

...experience. I mean we're dealing withhuman beings at the end of the day. So they're all kind of wired differently,they all have different needs and wants and goals, which is what's excitingabout management and what kind of wakes us up every day is the fact that no,two days are the same. No two article the same, you know, it keeps us on ourtoes, management is taking us into a lot of different areas, you know, onthe television and to apparel into touring and technology and you know,lots of different areas. One of the cool things about management. So thereis no kind of feeling on it. It can involved, um, and kind of take you intoseveral different world. Yeah, definitely. I know how that goes. Uh,just like bring it back to how you said they were, there are humans, I think alot of people, because I work with a lot of athletes and stuff and I thinkpeople just forget that they're human beings and not just celebrities, youknow? Yeah, and uh, what's your approach to like getting a new clientor like going after a client? Um, I...

...think we look for super stars, you knowwhat I think, um, now, you know, I was really looking for good partners andpartners that are willing to, you know, put the work in and work as hard aswe're willing to work uh super talented all sides of the music for me, butdevelopment and finding those things super early is something that's alwaysbeen um fun for me. You got to uh Huh just another podcast you're on, yousaid you've been working with Nellie for like, I think you said like, Idon't know, 10 or 11 years or something like that, is that correct? Yeah. Yeah.Yeah. So how did how did that come about? Uh We actually did a deal. Weactually partnered with a guy who was managing him at the time, a guy namedTony Davis. That's how we got introduced to the nelly business. Sohe's one of those guys were, you know, it's being from the East coast andhearing some of his music and stuff that he was doing early on, it was like,it took us into like a whole new subculture, you know, the the midwestand their slang and how they dressed...

...and you know, kind of the melodicnature of what he was doing with a little different for a lot differentthan what was happening at the time in rap music. So it was really kind of oneof those artists that just has always been super disruptive in doing thingsthat are a bit like the centre having, you know, number one country record,number one, you know, pop R and B. If, you know, like he had records that havehad number ones across every for amount of music just certainly very diverse inhis town group and not scared and willing to kind of take chancesmusically. But he has he embodies all of the qualities that you look for in ain an artist. Yeah, I know. Like what's your, I mean going differently, butwhat's your thoughts on like little Zannex like doing a song like withbilly Ray Cyrus? I mean, I think it's good for music, you know, I think, youknow, the more collaborations and folks finding intersections, you know,artists finding intersections with with their with their music. I think it'sgreat. I mean it's great for music. I...

...think it's good for the fans, you know,and when you see that kind of mutual respect for different genres of music,it's refreshing. Yeah, definitely. I mean, I definitely like, I think it'sdifferent and different, always good and change it up. Um like what wouldyou say for like an up and coming artists? Like what do you think? Likesay like a couple keys would be to like get them on the right path to likestart them? I mean, I think all of the tools that these artists have now, likethere's no real excuse for artists not to be able to get their music out. Haveit be heard using social tools and what not to create awareness around what itis that they're doing. You know, I think that, you know, folks ability tomake music now is significantly different than it was in the past andthat, you know, you can make beats, you can make records, you can do that stuffon the computer and you know, nowadays, so you don't really need, you know, tobe in a proper studio or you know, have...

...an exorbitant amount of money to makerecords. So, you know, really at this point there is really no reason why arethey shouldn't be able to, you know, get the music out in fact to createenergy around what it is. It's definitely, definitely, I know you'renot too big on social media, but what are your thoughts on social media? Imean, I think it's a great tool for artists. For me personally, you know,it's one of the things that I kind of struggled with over the years, whetherit was something that I wanted to do or didn't want to do, you know, as amanager, I feel like a lot of it was about putting our artists first wasnever really about us. So that was always felt a little bit weird to me tobe on socialism that way. But um, you know, definitely a tool that evenexecutives are using now to, to, you know, have a calling card of sorts.Yeah, definitely, definitely going back into other business ventures, I knowyou were a early investor in Uber and Spotify. So like going back to thoselike did you just have a good feeling...

...about those two companies? I mean those are, those companies arehard to have a good feeling about, you know, like you just realize that youdon't have to carry cds around anymore. Okay, I get this, you know, I get whatthis is or press a button and the car shows up and you know, to Lincoln Towncar or you know, and it costs the same amount as a taxi or you know, likethose things aren't hard to read. So those are pretty easy decisions like,yeah, and I saw you recently opened up a restaurant in west Hollywood. How did,how did that come about? Um, I got introduced to the, to the guy who ownedthe place from someone at my office who worked with and was able to invest themoney and jump into it, you know, something that I always wanted to do orbe involved with and I've been talked out of it several times. But yeah, thisis a easy kind of play because I don't have to do much. I'm just kind of showup and drink beer and chicken. Yeah,...

...yeah, but what advice would you give toa young entrepreneur? Uh, you get out what you put in as an entrepreneur, youdon't clock in or out, You know, there's no time where you, you know,you're off work, you know, so, um, you just got to be willing to put in thehour and the effort to be successful? It's not easy. Um Certainly achallenging lifestyle when you are reliant on betting on your stuff. It'snot for everybody. But I think the the rewards can be great if you're willingto put the work in. Yeah, definitely, definitely. All right. You ready forsome fun questions? They're gonna go from average to savage. All right.What's your favorite song currently? Mm Like it felt like new song? Yeah.Anything anything or like what's like a song that you just like play on repeat? Khalid talk probably. Right. I'll takeit. Are you a jersey guy or a sneaker...

...guy? ***? All right. What about what'sthree sneakers that you want that you don't own right now? Um The uh I got a lot. Alright, I got alot. I can't I can't think it through that. I wanted you have to get on likesneaker shop and then The little show, you know you two. Yeah. What about whois there any artists that you never work with that you want to work with?There's a ton. I mean, I understand of I'm really a fan of like old school R.And B. Like Patti Labelle and teddy, pendergrass and read the dandruff,Those kinds of writers. But you know, I think new school would be a new airschool T. V. Jay z There you go. Last one. What's harderbeing a parent or an entrepreneur,...

...entrepreneur. All right. I thought you were gonna sayparents. That's hard at the fun part. Got you,Got you, got you. All right. Well, I appreciate you coming on. And uh wouldyou let the people know where they can't find you on social media? I knowyou're not big on social media or like your website or anything you want toplug in? Uh human resources uh dot com. It's human dash R. E. Dash sourcestrump. Alright, again, I appreciate you coming up. Have a good one. No, thankyou. Yeah.

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