Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Jess Fishlock | Average To Savage EP110

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and tenth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring Jess Fishlock of the OL Reign. Paul Guarino talked with Jess Fishlock discussing her growing up in Wales, playing in the NWSL, and playing soccer around the world.

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This podcast interview with Jess Fishlock was originally recorded on November 5, 2020

This'll is the average to savage podcast with Paul Guerrino. Everyone in anyone, athletes, celebs and much more. What's up, everybody? Welcome back to another episode of average savage podcast or special guest today is just fish lock. Jess. How's it going? It is good. How are you? Good. I always wanted I always want to say Fish Locker for some reason, e think for ah, whole game. American commentators that actually called me a fish locker. Uh, well, it got it. Got a lot of traction on Twitter, actually, that's pretty funny. I don't know. Maybe I don't know. I don't know why, but what about just just going into, like, this season, like, how's it been? Just dealing with, like, you know, obviously the whole cove it I know you. You started over here in the us and then you got loaned out. Mm hmm. Yeah. You know, it's bean a bit of, ah, surreal kind of year. I think it's difficult for athletes, especially. I mean, it's difficult for everyone, of course, but I mean, when if you're looking at the rain, for example, when we went into this year, we were so excited about what it would bring and what we could dio andan, obviously like It's not that the season gets sidelined because obviously we had the challenge Cup on the four Siri's. But, you know, I wouldn't be lying. I would be lying if I didn't say that. It just it's not the same as a regular season. It's not the same as playing in 25 games or 24 games and getting a feel of how the team grows, how it progresses. Um, you know, and so I don't think that we really were able to do anything this year. And I think that's really quite sad for us as a group. Yeah, yeah, but on the flip side, I know the nwsl had great numbers they just came out with. I think it was like 500% of Yeah, So what, you're like, What's your feeling on that? Yeah, I think it in. Honestly, I think it's amazing. I think the, you know, Lisa, the commissioner and the league itself. There's a fabulous job, a kind of promote in the Challenge Cup, really like like we did. And I think also, you know, as coming back on DPI playing on being the first pro league to come back in America really helped that, because I think at that point, you know, people have being locked down for a while and probably what, um, you know, they would watch something new, if that makes sense. And so for those kind of audiences that perhaps wouldn't have watched female football or female soccer before, you know, being in lock down it it kind of give them more of a reason to. And I think we've always said in the women's game and women athletes in general that once you get somebody toe watch there very often come back, it's just getting them toe initially go okay, Yeah, I'm gonna I'm gonna watch women's sports. Yeah, I think also just like it being a tournament style and like the MLS doing the same thing. I think people just like that thrill of the tournament. Yeah, absolutely. And I've said, you know, obviously I'm from the UK and we have cups over here for like, everything, and I've said since I've being in America that they need to somehow get a cup going because it's just it's exciting, you know, we all know that Americans that they just love excitement. They really buy into it. Yeah, like, yeah, even me. I was just like a fan. Like I mean, I obviously know when, like the seasons go around, but like when it was like a tournament, I was, like, more more inclined to watch it. Yeah, I think you follow a little bit more. You get more involved in it, you know, because it's, like, shorter and on. You can follow it for, like, 23 weeks rather than 89 months. Scenario. Yeah. And then I know you. You guys were in Utah, right? Yeah. How How was it? Like in that bubble?...

Yeah, I'm not gonna lie to you. Was pretty bad way. Obviously left Seattle earlier. Went to Montana for a month prior to also Utah for a month and, you know, living in hotels, um, is fun for a little while, and then when it gets to to 23 months long, um, it gets pretty repetitive, But look, you know, the the our club Seattle did everything that they could possibly do to try and get us to feel as comfortable as we could, but I think just a whole kind of double life is, um, you know, it's difficult. Yes, it was. It was just, like go to hotel practice. Go home, go to game. Good practice. That's it? Yeah. Literally. We were only allowed on our floor. You weren't allowed to lose that leave out floor. We were only allowed to interact in other people's rooms. We could leave it to G o E. Um, that would get delivered to the hotel. For us. It would just be like, whatever was on the menu, we would only leave the hotel to train on. Then he doesn't get straight back, um, into the hotel and into the floor. And, you know, that was it for, like, two months, basically, um, which, you know is, you know, it's it's tough because I'm not gonna be here and be like, Well, being a professional athlete so hard, But, you know, it's not all glamorous e there. Yeah, for sure. And then I know you got loaned out, and I know you've been loaned out several times, so especially now what is it? What was the feeling like now? Just like you know, you're again used to the new quote unquote normal hair. And then you had to go back. Yeah. You know what? I was really thankful for the rain, actually, to allow me to be loaned out because, um, back home, you know, obviously in from Wales. So it's nice to be home for a long period of time. Um, And it, you know, I'd love to say that it's very different here, but it's not. The viruses is also over in Europe. And right now we're going through a huge second wave. So we're all in lock down again. Um, but we're still playing, so we are exempt from lock down as an elite athlete. So we continue to train, um, during the day, obviously, and then play our games and get tested regularly. I wanna go back a little bit, too. Just like how did you How did you just start playing soccer? So stop playing soccer. Um, a funny story, actually. I always tell the story. No one could believe it on one of six kids. So I have three sisters and two brothers. Eso obviously when we were growing up on the holidays, like some holidays, for example, you know, it was hard for me Ma naturally, because she's got six kids and so and so wants to go to, you know, it's one camp and somebody else wants to get to another account. Um, so the way that we kind of worked was that three older one got to choose, basically, when I wasn't the oldest one, so I never really could do an awful lot that I wanted. But my oldest sister, thankfully, wanted to go to a mere ham soccer camp, Believe it or not, um and so I you know, I mean, I was like, well, conference going there. So you're just gonna have to go because I can't take you anywhere else. So I was like, Okay, it's fine. Um, and I went there and honest to God, I just fell in love with football. Like my mom said, You know, obviously I didn't have, like, vivid memories off it, but my mom said that once I came back like that was there and never left football alone on. She has still has a photo from the paper that I was in, like that day from the Mia Hamm camp when I was seven. Um, and I think if you look at that photo. You'll see just how much I kind of fell...

...in love with the game. And then, you know, it was just the hate You didn't and went back. Um, but I just from that moment never stopped. And then I have two older brothers, and I just played with them, like the time pretty much in my boys teams. And then, you know, my local team and then just went through all the pathways and the processes toe to get to where I am. Yeah. So was that camp in Wales. Yeah, but leave it or not, I don't know how a Mia Hamm camp got anywhere near Wales, but it is e. I mean, that's dope. That's how big she is. Yeah, it sure, exactly. Yeah, I know it is. Um, is great. It was great. Um, what about just just growing up in in Wales? Like, uh, did you play any other sports you're on? I did. I did, actually. I was a very avid sports person. Um, I played hockey, cricket, rugby, um, basketball. Not really basketball, but played a little bit, um, swimming, added swimming, badminton. And, um, are there a lot of sports are played cricket and rugby for a long time. Um, I think there was a little bit of a toss up between Remember I was gonna go into cricket or go into football. My mom always says that was better a cricket than I am a football Onda. She tried to get me to go that way, but I did. It was always going to be football for me, I think. What about like, when did you know you were like, really good and you could be a pro? Um, I think I always knew when I when I was younger, like, 12 ft in that I was a little bit different if that makes sense that it wasn't just like a hobby. And I wasn't just playing on the weekend for fun, that it was something that I really, really wanted on. Obviously, coaches at that age often Comptel, um you know who's got the chance of making it or ever as they say, if you continue on that development. But I think I was about 15 16 when I personally decided that I was gonna sacrifice whatever I needed to sacrifice to get to wherever I wanted to. And so I dropped out of school, and I got a full time job to pay for everything. Um, and kind of just to be honest, put all my eggs in one basket is probably a pretty big risk at the time. But, you know, I just knew that that's what I wanted to do. So that's why I had to do okay when you say you left school. Like what? Like what grade was this? Ah, high school. So I was, like, 16. I think when I got a full time job. Yeah, I try to tell. I tell this story in America, and everyone almost falls over you. So you didn't finish high school? Um, I got my grades, my GCSE s which I don't know what you call them. Um, but yeah, I dropped out of 16. Uh huh. So that doesn't I don't know. You don't know what e get this All the time in America, Sometimes minds not connecting. Yes, the rain. When I first got to America the first year, the rain sent me to do a talk to kids going to college. And obviously a lot no one knows much about our system. So yeah, they were like, Oh, you know, what did you do in university or the And I was with one of my very good friends now, and I started laughing. And I was like, I can't really answer that question because I dropped out of school when I was 16, and my my friend next to me was like, You can't say that here I was like, E. I was like, I finished school, but I didn't go to college or the way...

...the system works here is your in school to your 16, and then you get two years between 16 and 18, which we call college. Um, and then you go from 18 to whatever, then, like 24 or 26 whatever you're studying to go to university. So it's slightly different. Back when I was growing up, you had a choice of whether you wanted toe continue education at 16. But I think now that's 18. I'm not sure them gosh eso All right, So then, like on the flip side, Like what? Like what did you do to just, like, educate yourself on different like source of things. You just use the Internet. Um, you know, it depends on kind of what part of life I'm going in, right? So, yeah, the reality is, if I actually think that I probably learnt more about life by living in I mean, I was 16 and I get this paycheck and I'd have to deal with my taxes or deal with, you know, paying rent or bills and and things like that at at 16, you know? And I think when you realize that you realize about going to work and punctuality and dealing with managers or dealing with colleagues or dealing with, like, problems. You know, I ended up living that life very, very young, and I think that I learned a lot, um, of how life actually works like the real world when I was still teenager. And I think that, you know, growing up and then obviously becoming a professional athlete and living in loads of different countries, you know, I've lived in Holland, Germany, France, Australia, um, America, the U. K. You just you learn about different cultures and how they how they work and how they survive and what works for them. And, you know, I think in truth, I've never really, you know, gone online and looked up educational things. I've just learned it through conversation on Did you know topics and this kind of stuff? Yeah. Yeah, for sure. Yeah. I mean, also just saying, you know, that seems better anyways, because, you know, a lot of kids graduate college over here and then have no idea what to do with their lives anyways. So I mean, I didn't want to say that. I'll say it for so So, yeah, so and then what? What is it? How was it just being like a You're a pro at 16. And then just obviously, I'm assuming you had a lot of older teammates. Yeah, well, I didn't to approached. I was 19, so I was still kind of semi pro and then working full time and then also playing for my you 19 national team on my seen my Welsh senior team at that point. So, to be honest with you, I don't even think education would have worked with my schedule. Um, you know, I in those kind of three years of working full time on playing for you 19 and playing for my senior team and then playing part time for my club. You know, I didn't have a lot of time thio to do anything else. But once YouTube, I turn pro then and moved toe Holland to live for three years. You know, I learned a completely different life than you know. I was in the locker room with, you know, girls have bean that had bean pro girls that don't speak any English and a different kind of culture. And, you know, when you grow up, you also you grew up in America also grew up in the UK You know, you until on there you leave and go for colleagues or you leave to go anywhere you live in a bubble, right? Like a really kind of bubble. That is just I often think, and I always say, it's not really quite really You could make that bubble whatever you want of it, but it really doesn't doesn't replicate life at all on when I went to Holland, you know, I really kind of was was made...

...aware of what kind of life is life outside of the UK or outside of whales outside of my little bubble. And, um, it was a tough transition. It was really difficult for six months. Um, but after that, you know, I kind of never looked back. And I really enjoyed that kind of life. How? You gotta tell me, what was your job? Those three years? I waas I was a data analyst for a a big kind of phone company. Uh, mobile phone, basic class, just on computers all time and then speaking toe people that had problems with the way our service was going, and I just winged it. I winged it for three years. I've no idea what idea the whole time. Yeah, well, yeah, I just want people to know that, like, you know, I mean, everybody always has some kind of, you know, start a startup job, and then you get Well, my actual 1st 1st 1st job was Burger King, so 00 yeah, yeah. I had to get my little weekend money. Oh, well, yeah, Well, were you the cook? No, I wasn't. But I ended up getting the sack because I was given away free food to homeless people. Oh, I got cool. And I was like, Well, there we go. I'm looking apologizing for it. because you waste so much food here and these poor people are just, like, freezing cold and hungry. So whatever. Yeah, so I know you Like you said you mentioned you played all around. What? What made you come to the U. S? Well, the U S so notoriously has has always been the best league in the world for for the for women's soccer. Um on. Do you know, when I was growing up, it was definitely something that you you wanted to go and do, You know, if you went over and you were able to play in America, then kind of meant nine times out of 10 that you're pretty good. So it was kind of a dream, really, Teoh, to get the opportunity to play that and kind of show, show my talent, but also show that, like, you know, little girl from whales can can make a big time and kind of kind of, I don't know, like, let other people in Wales have other little girls and whales. No, that you know, this there's things like that and you can dream big, you know? And that was something for me that I really wanted Thio to dio on DSO when the opportunity came. You know, I I I didn't even I didn't even think about it. I think I would have done it for free, to be honest. Oh, that's that's kind of funny, cause, like, I think the opposite. Like I feel like if American goes like, you know, overseas in, uh, like they quote unquote made it. Yeah, I think that is the outlook, especially in the men's game, which which I understand that the women's game it's it's the opposite. Because the women's game in America is massive. It's huge, but also the women's national team. And America is probably the most successful team in the world. Yeah, for sure. Yeah, And then what? Just I know I already touched on it, but, like, what does it feel like to get, like, loaned out? Is that like a good feeling or like a bad feeling or mixed? No. You know, it depends where the loan idea comes from, I guess. But my loans have always bean something that I've wanted to do personally, Um, on Thankfully, Seattle have always been a club that understand kind of those bigger pictures on Gwen the our league was first starting. You know, it was kind of a relatively shortly. Get on your and flight 67 months. And when you're international player, you know, way have games all the time throughout the year, and you just couldn't afford...

...toe have five months off. Really? And so that was why it came around initially. Um, you know, I really I was not going to go on loan this year at all. I kind of only had two last minute because off the covert situation, coming back from injury and needing to play games. Yeah, I got you. What about, like So can you can you say no to alone or no? Yeah. Okay. Wasn't wasn't sure you can and and sometimes, like, the club will want to loan you out. If even if you don't want to go to clip and say, I think maybe we should we'll put you on loan. So you get some game time, etcetera, etcetera. So often it's like younger players. They get to go alone. But in the women's game, it's really different from the men's game. It's kind of a People do it because they have a chance to win something or like for me, for example, and everyone that's on loan right now from the W Nwsl. It's mostly because of coverage and the need to play games. Gotcha. And then I saw that you were a player coach a couple of years. How did how did that come about Jason? Well, I'm doing my badges, so there's my bit of education. They're doing my coaching badges going back to school. Um, and so I actually was supposed to be a player assistant coach. That was what was supposed to happen, so I could learn in a little while. So I was on loan the coaching side of it and get a little bit of experience there. But you know something, You know, it didn't quite go that way, and the head coach went over to be an assistant coach for the men's club. And so I ended up being the coach and the manager whilst playing, and I would never recommend that ever again to anybody in the entire world, eyes that what you want to do. Post crew. You wanna be a coach, you know, for a very, very, very long time. I thought that It was something that I really wanted to do. But I think his time has gone on and I've got a bit older. I don't know. I think I kind of want to go into a little bit. Politics. Maybe. Actually, um, that we'll see. I would like to. I think I'd like to come back home and do some politics and whales, but, you know, I don't know how that would work. To be honest, I don't know what politics looks like. Some whales, but I would not be in no politics in the U. S. E can assure you I would never do that either. On. Then what about just playing for your national team? Like, what does that mean to you? Ah, everything I would I would trade in my whole club. Korea, my trophies. I would trade it all in to go to a major tournament with my country in a heartbeat and a hobby. Yeah. What about? I know you got named. Um I think how many times? Four times. One of the best players in the in the nwsl. What did that mean to you? It was special. Actually, it was special because you know you get voted by that through other teams, coaches and players. And so you kind of know that, um, you know, you've done all right, Andi. That's always nice. You know, I think you know, I was lucky. And I'm still very lucky to be a part of the rain. Um on Did you know we've had some really, really successful times, and it's been one of the kind of highlights of my career being a part of that group of players. And so, you know, um, I just I love playing for the rain and I love the Nwsl. And, you know, I'm lucky enough to have a pretty good career. That and so, you know, here's to hoping it happens over the next couple of...

...years as well. What else do you want to see? Like obviously, we just talked about the numbers before, Like, what else you want to see grow in the in the in the nwsl. I want to see. You know, I think I want to see a little bit of squad depth to grow. I want I want to see Mawr Europeans coming over or more kind of Yeah, players coming into the league? Definitely. Um, I want to see the media and that kind of be a little bit more fair with, Yes, the American plays in the legal great, but like the national players, they're great. But the league is actually made up of very, very, very good players overall, whether their use a national team, players where they're from Europe or there from Australia, whether they just come out of college. Like I think the only way the league grows Mawr is if the media on everybody doesn't just focus on, like, 12 players, um, but completely understand that like the use a national team is what will bring people in tow, watch the game. So it's kind of like a classic Catch 22. Um, but yeah, Other than that, I think it's actually grown really well. I think our new commissioner, Lisa, has been phenomenal in her job role. What she's done with regards to her job. You know, we had old Commissioner probably wasn't as proactive, and I think we kind of missed a few Mr Boats there. But, you know, we've managed to grow at a time where you would imagine that we wouldn't and I think that's very, um promising. Yeah, well, I'd say your team is doing very good at social Media because that's how we got linked up. Yeah, that's great. Um, yeah, like, what do you like? Oh, yeah. What was the Why did they change the name? Uh, Seattle? Because the the rain will Seattle reign. Um, has now been kind of bought by Olympic Lee on from France. And so they kind of like sister clubs on dso. That was That happened last year. And so obviously they had to merge the two. So a friend So, um, owns a really big club, actually, in the men's game and well, actually, in the women's game, ol are probably the most successful club team in the world. That's crazy. Yeah. And so they brought us out, I think, because they want to build the same kind of product, um, in America. So we had to change the name on the badge, but I love it. I think it's great. I actually played for ol. I wanna learn that, um on their incredible the people that run the club. Incredible thing group is great. And I think in the next college 2 to 5 years, you'll see a massive growth within our club. Yeah, I mean, yeah. See, I had no idea that that's crazy and that that's why I like the overseas soccer like I just I get it. But I don't fully understand it so on. And and it's just like that's why even when I remember, I didn't even know because I remember, like looking, looking you up side like I don't even know you had, like, the National Games, like a couple weeks ago. Yeah, because I was looking it up and I was just like, I shouldn't have any games this week. But then I saw that that you post, I was like, Oh, the national team, though, Yeah, it's really it's really quite hard for people to understand with the national team in that in America, it's so different. Even our, like European FIFA and U. S s so different from CONCACAF. So, like, I completely understand that, you know, because if you ask, anybody over here about...

Conquer Cafe have no clue if all right, you gotta tell me about this most excellent order of the black you got Yeah. Yeah, dio, um, basically in. Obviously, we're governed by sovereignty and the king and queen. And, um, every year they select a handful of people, um, to kind of be recognized by the Empire. The British Empire off kind of, uh, excellence. Almost. And you become a part off the British empire on DSO Someone nominated May I don't I still don't know who that waas for my services to women's football until the l G B T. Q community. Because I do a lot of work for that, Adam. So, yeah, there. Royal family kind of gave me a cute little badge and said, Well done, Jessica s so thank you very much. Eso Was this, like a whole ceremony or Yeah, I went to the Buckingham Palace and last Christmas. Actually, Andi, not last Christmas. The Christmas before on. Yeah, I got my little my little pain. Like how? Like how How like elite Is that very, very. Um, yeah. I don't think it gets more elites to be honest with me unless I become, like a dame cream. Okay, So does everybody. So sort of like everybody know you in Wales. I think a lot of people do, Yeah, not just and I think for me, it's not just about foot boards. I do a lot of community work. Um, you know, I just I kind of love my country. Like I really I'm patriotic. And And then no, in a way where I'm, like, blinded to things that need to get better. Um, but I don't just want to be somebody that is like, what else needs to be like? This sort of needs to be better and then not help that grow. Um, because I just don't want to be that person. So I do a lot. Yeah. In the community and in my local community. Yeah, like I said in the LGBT community with youth soccer, and, you know, I just want young people in Wales to be able to Yeah, grow, I guess. Yeah. So what? Again? What? Because I don't know personally. What? What have you done for the LGBT community? I think, um, I came out. I don't know. When? Five years ago. Maybe publicly. Like via the media, um, to kind of just start to be visible in our country, Um, you know, for obviously youth. And then I also did a, um what I do an interview and some work. I do a lot of work for the communities anyway, in like with the youth kind of Humanae centers, etcetera, etcetera raise money for hostels that hold LGBTI use that that, you know, often abandoned. E came out and did a interview That kind of changed the way that, um, schools kind of run in Wales because I said that when I was in school it was hell and it Waas school for me was horrible because I was in a school that still had, like, segregated like stairs. So girls don't once they're boys going another state, you can't go anywhere. I couldn't play...

...football. I couldn't play any sports apart from, like, Jim and dance, which is so stereotypical it's unbelievable. And it just wasn't a place for me when I could help find myself. You know, obviously, like your teenage years, a lot of hardest years of your life anyway and you're trying to be okay in life. And then obviously I'm gay and I know that I'm gay, but there's nowhere in the world nowhere in society. For me to be on school was like the complete opposite of that if that makes sense. And so I came out and did a big article about how you know, I think schools shouldn't be like that for any asked for any student, let alone like someone who's who's gay. I mean, it doesn't matter whether you're gay or whether you're, you know, a little bit geeky or nerdy or, you know, I mean, there should always be schools should be a safe place for whoever you are, whether you're a nart ist, you know, like sometimes people don't understand artists. And, you know, I think that actually, like, you know, it changed the law here in Wales because that that went really big and schools often were like Okay, well, we need to look at that, if that makes sense. So I've just I've just done a lot of work in about the visibility off LGBT Q and that it's okay. And where to go if you don't feel safe for what? To dio. If your family has struck, you know what I mean? Like just a lot of things like that. Yeah. Yeah, that's awesome. Um what? What advice would you give Teoh a player trying to make a pro league. God, my advice would be that, like, when you have to enjoy it, right? Like you have to enjoy what you do. I think anyone kind of knows that. So don't ever don't ever lose your love for the game. But also kind of alongside that, you know? Listen, work hard, have a really good work ethic. The be a good teammate, like, be a really good teammate. And often those things will get you a lot further than, um, Then you think All right. Um, are you ready for some fun questions? We? Oh, yeah, yeah. Let's go. What? Which favorite song right now? Oh, great question. I'm gonna go with Khalid on 100. All right? I think I might know. I'm not sure. I don't know. It's song title that Just listen, Thio. Who would you want to do a jersey exchange with that you haven't done with with yet? Here's the exchange. Oh, wow. Um, far out. It's a great question. Do you guys do that during the national Games? Mm. Not really. You don't want the national jersey of the other play? Um What Jersey exchange? What I want This is a great question. I actually have so many good jerseys from just the people that I that I love Tell me which ones you have. I have Wendy or not Asian l Osama's I have Pino shirt and now her cow assuming shirt Um a Lulu Bond should naturally those people for May, I'd I'd like truly just love a Kim little shit. She's my gal. Um But when I think about one that I would have now or when I would love like love in my wall, I would have I would go and get an old retro man and I each year and ask Eric Cantona to sign it. That's why would Dio What about Who is your...

...favorite player growing up? Eric Cantona. Alright, You never got to meet him now. Now he was ah, very kind of different eccentric player for United's hey was unbelievable. He changed their history Really? They got united and they just they got cut in and I just started winning and winning and winning. But he was also a little bit different, you know, Like he couldn't play for his national team. Didn't have like on overly great attitude. He was like a you know, like Ibrahimovic? Almost. Only he was even better. Yeah, I got you. Um what about? Has anybody ever asked you for your jersey? And you were just like, like, surprised? Um, yeah, I think you know what I think of more was a little bit surprised when someone once my jersey, You know, it's always nice when people come up to you and specifically asked for your jersey. Um, so every kind of time it's always puts a smile on my face. What is it? Is it protocol to ask before or after? After After What about? What do you like to do in your free time? Drink? I've seen him out of coffee. I thought you had to say so. I'm with I. You know, I like going out for branches and stuff. I love going to gigs. I love going to gigs. Um, but you know what do you mean, gigs like concerts? Yeah, concept. So, yeah, I went to, like, three. It was, but I went to Khalid some Smith and Ellen John. Six year. Well, last year Uh, loved it. Yeah. What about like, what's your favorite American food? Oh, Scott, The hot wings. Alright. Well, alright, If I went to whales, what would I have tow? Like try? There. You're into whales. You need to try our lambs. Bloody lovely. Um, Elam. Elam Sunday roast. My mama would make you if you came here. And I promise you you'll never leave on sort of God. How about that? I never had lamb. Well, that's great. Well, they're Ugo. There you go. When you've never had lamb on Welsh lamb is even better than normal lamb. All right. Um what? Something people don't know about you? Um, people don't know about me. I love up. Basically, I love like, serial killers. Basically, what I mean by that is I'm not like the friend, of course, but serial killers are fascinate me. Have you seen, like, mind hunter and all that, uh, I binge those in my spare time is well, so yeah, I think that's something a little bit different. Alright, So I asked you a lot of questions. Do you have any questions for May? Yeah, Like Wow, how did you get on the hype? Why did you get on the hype? What kind of got you in tow? Ol rain. And why did you stay and that kind of stuff. Okay, so I worked with a lot of w N B A players, okay? And, uh, and I was just like, throughout the years, like instead of going into, like, the quote unquote major sports like I was working with, like, a lot of work with a lot of em Emma and boxing guys. So then it was just like and then, like, women's basketball became like a niche. And I was like, you know, yeah, let me check out women's soccer. So I tweeted all the teams and your team tweeted me back. Uh oh. Rain. There you go. That's why I said they got the best social media. Yeah, there we go. Easily swayed.

Somebody say so That that's the key for teams out there. They should be more active on social media. Yeah, it is true. It's very true. What about what about you? What about stuff like that? Are you Are you, like big? I know, since you're quote unquote a little older, like so how is social media like impacted? Like because I'm sure it wasn't even a thing when you first started. Like, how has that impacted like your career and, like Bill just built up sports in general. Yeah, it's an interesting one because I actually think there's like a lot of pros and cons to it. Obviously, the pros of it is, you know, visibility connection, like you said, and being active and getting getting more views, getting more lives, getting people to engage in your club, which will then sell tickets. And, you know, it's kind of the same from athlete is, Well, it's you can really put your brand out there, and that helps responses accept such a bet. On the flip side of that, um, you know, I think everybody knows about online abuse and kind of trolling and and and that side of it. And also, I think it's really hard for youngsters now. It's easy for me, easier because I never grew up with it. So it's just something that has come in that I can use as and when I want to, if that makes sense. But I think with the younger generation they grew up with it, and it's really hard for them to not allow it to define them. And I think that is a very difficult thing. Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think in a negative way to like when its athletes in general and they, you know, put out these highlight tapes and they get, like, millions of dollars, and then it's just, like, not it's not good for their mental out. Exactly. Yeah. Last one, I just thought about it. Like, have you ever had any crazy fan moments where they ran up on you? Yeah. Yeah, I actually, I actually was out here when I first came over with my sister on, we were out just in Wales. Um, just having like a having a boozy brunch on bond. We were just in the middle of town and just neck in the genes. Um, on one guy, like walk paths on literally, almost, like, jumped over the little fence barricade that we were in. Women are sat outside. I was like, Oh, my God, are you just fish lock? Oh, my God. And I'm just there, like, half drunk in in the middle of the day with my sister thinking there's no way in hell anybody is going to see me here. It's on it, you know? And then my sister just just looking at me going. Oh, my fucking God. And I'm like China. I can't obviously say no, but I'm obviously here with these drinks, half drunk on, like, I don't know Monday afternoon or something. I was like, This is the worst possible thing that's happening right now, but I have to say yes. And they were like, gods. Great. I can't believe it. Can I get photo and all that? But it was It was funny. Like when he left. I was like, Right, we've got to go because I can't be seen that drinking. Remember the day? So you are, like, famous. Famous? Yeah. Well, that was they. Yeah. What about in the U. S? Has anything happened? Yeah, in Seattle. You know, I walk. Does it ever does it ever get annoying? E. I don't think I can. I'm not gonna say air against annoying, but sometimes it's just you know when when you want to just enjoy your drink or enjoy your food and stuff like that. You kind of, you know, just want to do that. But, I mean, it's no. I would never say it's annoying because often you're alongside,...

...like kids. A swell. And you never really want to get annoyed at that. Yeah, for sure. Well, I appreciate you coming on. And, uh, could you let the listeners nowhere to follow you on? Social media? Yes. My instagram is at just fish. Look, my twitter is at just fish. Look on. Those were the only two I use. I use nothing else. No Tic tac, No tic tac. No, no, no.

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