Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 3 years ago

Johnnie JB Bird | Average to Savage EP40

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the fortieth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring entrepreneur Johnnie JB Bird III. Paul Guarino talked with JB Bird discussing him walking on to the UConn men's basketball, his life after sports becoming an entrepreneur, launching his brand Hashtag Do Mode, and why he decided to go to Yale University for graduate school! Follow JB https://www.instagram.com/tripleup_jb https://twitter.com/tripleup_jb https://www.facebook.com/HashtagDoMode/ Powered by Receptra Naturals https://receptranaturals.com/

... athletes, sets and much more. This episode is powered by receptor naturals. My name is boss Ruten and here are my top three reasons why I love Receptra. First, when I stopped taking prescription paint bills in two thousand eight, I didn't have anything to replace them with until I discovered Receptra, which has helped me a lot. Second, if I have a long drive in front of me, I take it before I start driving. Why? Because it keeps my mind and my back muscles more relaxed, and that makes it easier for me to deal with idiots in traffic. Third, if I really want to push myself, I take it before a workout, because it helps with less selected asset build up, and that means I can push myself much harder. Those are my top three reasons. God speat, so up, everybody. I bag for another episode of the average savage podcasts. Our special guest today is entrepreneur Johnny Bird, the third AKJB JB. What's up the man I don't call good. Let's just jump right into it. Could you give us a little brief background about yourself. I am an entrepreneur, as you mentioned on the business card, Hashtag to mode, where we are digital network and platform. So essentially what we do is we help people build relationships with each other in network with each other on a more intimate, more personable basis. Mainly for introverts, but everybody is a welcome and I host small to mode collectives where we have small networking relationship, purposeful relationship building type stuff happening, and I also do some speaking engagements. I'm also an author. Wrote a book called the toughest to out on Amazon, barns and nobles. You can grab that is about transitioning from a lessons to young adulthood, using my experience as a walk on on Yukon Basketball Team, and also attend, yeah, brass school right now. So don't doing that on top of everything else. And also a host of another podcast called the famously average, so you can check that out on itunes and soundcloud. So doing a lot of stuff right now. Definitely got a lot of someone in the resume. Yeah, and I know you're originally from North Carolina. So how did your family end up moving to Bridgeport Connecticut? So my dad is originally from bridgeport and his, his mom, my grandmother. They're from Georgia. My mom is from North Carolina. So that's how I ended up in a Calina. I'm from Fayeteville, North Carolina, boring on Fort Braggs, but lived in Fairville. So if anybody knows anything about fair build and it was a small military town. Ain't much happening. Most people know Fairville because of JAC but other than that, you know Fayville doesn't have much going on. But yeah, I ended up in bridgeport because, like I said, my dad's family was here. My Grandmother's moved here. So my eventually ended up in Bridgeport Connecticut. It's always interesting find out how people gets Connecticut, in my opinion. Yeah, there's a lot of trans plans here, for sure. And so...

...what was the decision on going to Yukon? Because I remember we did blog in a reew few years ago and I remember you saying that you wanted to go to UNC. Yeah, so no, being from North Carolina, I think every kid aspirations is to go to you the UNC a Duke, and if you like either or you can't like the other one. So I was Atario Fan. You would just see my room when I was younger, which is none the Tario stuff Michael Jordan with they all the greats, you know, Vince Carter, so on and so forth. So it's like I gotta go there, feel me. And Yeah, so I wanted to go there, try my hand in, but I ended up going to high school and Rish Board. So it made it that much harder because I wasn't in state. In North Carolina school system they aim to keep people in state. So, which is a not a bad thing, that's a great thing, but you know, that just lessing my odds. So I ended up trying to, you know, put my hand in there and it just the cars aligned for me to end up going to University of Connecticut, which is not something I had on my vision board, but that's why I ended up going. Ever, sure, did you? Did you apply to UNC I applied, got in, couldn't afford it because it was out of state, you know, and having a real talk with my mom was like listen, try this, you can out for a little bit. I wasn't even going to apply to you. My God is counseled. If it wasn't for him throwing that application and then I use the same as a I use for my other schools that I wanted to go to and I was like, you know what, fine, you know, I'll do it as a safety because you but I wasn't really carrying up. I never visited my school. Visited you con several times, I never went and I was really a late decision to go there. Actually, I miss orientation, I miss all that stuff because I wasn't planning on going there. It was kind of put me behind a ball when I got there. Yeah, it was a taxing decision process. Definitely. I feel like the a lot of people, that happens with picking college to go to. Yeah, I mean it's a big thing, especially when you first generation your family and no one really knows the rope, so you trying to figure this all out on the fly. And plus the kind of person I was, I was just thinking about basketball. was really just think about sports and my friends. So like most teenage kids at the time. So it's not like I had the blueprint of what I needed to do. Even if I got to UNC I probably would not know what to do with it when I got there in the first place. So you can at the very least was, you know, an hour, hour and a half away, so, you know, I could get back to some familiar faces, if anything. Yeah, I mean I applied to eight schools, gone two, three. So I didn't have any options. So I just, you know, picked every much. I'll go. Man, you got you kind didn't let me in really, and not again to crazy, not even the what do you call it? The side of like campus? Yeah, and I even those anyways. So then you're so what's your motivation beyond like walking onto the basketball team? Originally I was playing baseball. You can because, like I was saying earlier, I was motivated by sports. That's my identity. No, I mean when you growing up playing sports, I played bass on basketball, probably a better baseball player than I was a basketball player, just...

...the way up and built. And Yeah, it was just like, you know, I want to do something, I can't stop doing what I've been doing my whole life, and so I play baseball for a little bit of you con that didn't work out, probably because more me than anything, now that I can admit years later, and once that ended, I needed something. So I try my end and basketball is playing basketball on the wreck every night anyway. And I met a couple of people that were managers on a team and they suggested that I try out. I did. I made the first cut. Then I kind of got a preview of what life was like on you can basketball team and at first I really, really didn't like it. It was not something that I was interested in participating in, and only because it was like I felt like it was. It was pointless. As I walk on, like you go there and you just practice, practice, and used as dummies basically, and rebounding machines and just like, you know what, that's not for me. So I ended up stopping and but doing that really, unbeknownst to me, really just created the downwards spiral my fresh meter, because I had no connection to anything, being plucked out of the inner city and going to Yukon, and if anybody of your listeners know anything about stores Connecticut, it's not exactly the most diverse place in the world. So it's like, Damn One am I going to do? You know, I'm I'm here, I don't know anybody, I can't relate to anybody and none of my friends are here and I'm not playing sports. So and not prepared for like the rigors of college course work and stuff like that. So it was just bad news all the way around that freshman year. Yeah, though, you're going to say there's nothing to do there, because to do that's the problem. It's too much to get into. And then so you got back on the team, or then you got back got the team right. Yeah. So eventually, after getting kicked out my freshman year because academic probation two terms of a row, I mustle my way back into campus and then kind of turned a new leaf and or change my attitude, I should say, in terms of what I wanted, and walk back onto the team, which was kind of a setback because of the way the walk on system work back then. Was that you know your first year, you know you sit out. It's just the way you goes. So it's almost like a redstre here. And Yeah, so I had to restart my clock, so to speaking, but I kind of humble myself and I got back on the wave and ended up sticking. Yeah, what was the whole experience like? Just playing under like coach Calhoun and playing with all those great players you played with. At first, while I was in it, I wasn't really I wasn't too enamored with the place. That's partly betting, from the inner city and just being that kind of having that chip on your shoulder. Way You think you're better than everybody. So it's just like, or at least as good as these people, and so I'm I went in with the mentality like these are my peers, these are people that I can compete with. It though, you know, there's seven foot three, seemed to be, or...

...as a prize all American, or Kimba Walker, which we know was his success story and all that stuff. You know, it's like in my mind I was just attacking these practice each day, like, you know, I had the opportunity to kiss, I burned. So I think my experience was a lot different in some of my other welcome brothers, because my mentality was that I wanted to play. So I was like aiming at people's heads when I was going on the court. I was trying to you know, school, I was trying to pick pockets, I was trying to do whatever I could just stand out and not really realizing that the cars, the condos backed against you because politics and theocracy and all that stuff, like, you know, when you walk on you're asking to be there, but when you're a scholarship player. They asked you to be there, so that's just a different level of respect you get. You know, I was kind of fighting up hill battle, but while I was in it, you couldn't tell me nothing. Yeah, for sure. So after collogy was it was the right of colleges worth the book. That's opus to right up to college. I ended up going back to school because I had that redshirt. Ye had another year eligibility, so I just use that eligibility to Grad, assist play another year to get my master's, and then it was like a question of whether or not I wanted to take my talents overseas like some of my friends. You know, I've ventured off and talking to a couple of agents about it, but long really short, I ended up not doing that. I didn't want to go overseas because some of the horror stories I was hearing. But overseas, man, people tend overseas is all tax free money and this and that, but what people don't realize is you go overseas if you're not playing in top Tier Leagues. You're getting paid pennies, basically, and it's only for a few months out of the year, which means you have to come back home and survive and it's hard to just pick up jobs here and there or if you don't have a stable home system or whatever. So it's just like I didn't want to put myself through all that ass of knowing that my stabilities and me going to the NBA where nail basically. So it was just like, you know, at some point you got to face reality and, you know, look at what the cars are that you got and try to play those instead of China. You know, Vanessa Hope Dream. That's probably been done. Yeah, yeah, definitely. I mean probably not risking your life for a few dollars, even smart. Exactly exactly. So what was your ultimate decision to write the book? The topest year, after actually meeting a few few people that that I didn't know, that didn't know me, but they knew my story. So new what. But I did at you can and I was coaching my nay you team and one of the DAD's on a team actually was you know, when you go play are you got these long weekends to day tournaments on so u. So you spend time with the parents of the kids and between games and stuff like that, and they just getting to know me. I'm getting to know them and they're realizing that, hey, you got a hell of a story on your hands, man, or what you went through and what it seems to be like where you at in your life right now. And I'M INS me, I'm thinking that I have it. You know, this is regular. Everybody goes through something. It's...

...just a matter of what that something is, and so I didn't think nothing of it. But I actually got pushed to right, not the toughest too, but just the right this stuff down, which turned into the toughest to afterwards. Got You, got, you gotta. What was the process like writing the book? Write in a book is no joke, I mean, especially if you're not a natural writer, and I don't believe myself to be a natural writer. But Luckily for me, I was writing from my own experience, so it was a little easier and that sense, because its just recounting your experiences versus trying to make some stuff up. You know, it took a while. took me like a year to like get everything down on paper and then edit it and then, you know, I had it to you know, people to help edit it put it in a way that's not just about and, you know, make it makes sense, chronological order, stuff like that. So the process is dauncing and I advise anybody who wants to take on right in a book to really think about, you know, what they're trying to get out of it, because it could be lucrative or it could just be therapeutic, but either way it's still going to be a lot of work. And like, what did you feel like about like people actually reading it? And it's like, personally, not I mean yeah, I mean that's not gonna lie. That's being an introverted individual. It's it's hard enough to open up to people face to face and it's hard enough to open up to people that you know, let alone open up the strangers through text who are left to their own devices on trying to judge on what you saying and what you did, and maybe they can miss read or how they interpret your context is up to them and you almost have no saying that. So it was tough to open up, to be honest with you. And you know, I had to come to grips with letting some of this stuff out. And some of the stuff is embellished for story purposes, you know, for slow so it's A. Technically it's a fictional book, so it's not there's no like things in there that's going to hurt anybody, but it is kind of, you know, loosely based off of my experience, like I was saying. So I was drawing from my experience to help me write the story that can resonate with other people. Yeah, definitely. What about like the other like walk ons reach out to you when you release the book? Oh Yeah, my welcome brothers who were close to this day. And Yeah, they reached out and I pay sure all of them got it. Is there like a I'm saying, like for other schools, are like a secret, like walk on Group, walk on community, now that I know of that would be said that. I would imagine there could be one. Now with you know, Gramm and facebook and stuff, we should start a group. That could be something. I think. I'll leave that pack if they want. And what was the year you started Hashtag do mode Hash I don't started around three years ago. It was actually off the heels of the book we want to book came out, surprisingly enough, who got some good reviews and some people really liked it. So it turned out that we had...

...a little mini book tour I'm not the major, just, you know, local and kind of on the East Coast, and it forced me to, you know, speak. Public speaking is added to the resume. And then so now I'm speaking about the book. And then after a while it was less about the book and more about my process of doing things, and people were asking me about how I sort of questions like you're asking, like what was my process for putting the book together, or how did I overcome these outscoles in life, and so on and so forth. So it turned into me using the Hashtag. It's early days ig when hashtagging was like a real thing actually meant something. I use do mode as a Hashtag to it was really just a toime capsule of my work. So I was using Hashtag do mode as a way to keep all the photos of me just doing like kind of behind the scene stuff. And then it turned into the business, because people are looking at the Hashtag and then they were reference to Hashtag and then they started using it themselves and then it became a little small community of people just doing dope shit and chasing a passions. Yeah, I just want to say I still love twitter, and so tell me you were more about like, where you're trying to accomplish like, and then with the like, the collectives and stuff like that. With do with do mode, the collectives. They are purposely kept small and intimate and, like I said earlier, is for introverts. I get them towards introverts. Introverted people tend to have a connotation about them that is often viewed as negative because they are standoffish or maybe they don't like geting around people. But it's not that. It's just that it's more about a level of comfortability than anything. And so to dom collectives. I found myself having to go to networking events when I was no re fresh out of school trying to find a job. You gotta do what you got to do, go to job fairs, networking events, on and so forth. And I will go to those things and they be massive. You know, it be fifty a hundred people in the room. You got to bring business cards and you got to have the right at tire and you got to speak properly and shake hands and you know, kind of just fake your way through it and with people that you probably won't ever talk to again. And for some people that works, but for people like me it doesn't work. I just was one of those people that would go to these events and just being a corner and I'd leave with the same amount of business cards I came with in their all mind. So it was just an idea I had where I'm like, Noah, they should be a networking space for people like me who, if offered the opportunity, can talk about their business or their dreams, but in a more comfortable space. So I started these collectives about a year and a half ago and I've been doing them every so often and I'm becoming more consistent with them as of late, and they've been the success. Each time I've done them we've had about fifteen twenty people in the room, and not everybody in the room are introverts. For the most part it's been introverted entrepreneurs and bitious individuals who, you know, just want to connect...

...locally and, you know, shares stories, advice experiences on how their journey is because I think, you know, we're in a time right now where a lot of people are jumping into this entrepreneurial pool. So it's a beautiful time, but it's also oversaturated time. So people are experiencing a lot of things that other people are going through, and why not share our experiences to help each other get to where we want to get to? Yeah, definitely back to the job career for every thing. It's just like I've been trying to like tell people, like, instead of doing these bullshit interviews and acting all fake, why not just do it like sports and half tryouts? That's true, like be like all right, you're going to work for free for a week. We'll see what you do. Like, how is that not better than doing an interview? That's interesting idea. I never thought of it like that. Yeah, so that's a that's a in general. I mean I've done that stuff sort in the past, like do free work and then at least something else, and that's how stuff happens pretty much for me, most of them, usually, I mean outside of interviews and stuff like that. That's that's how you get gigs and when you do an entrepreneurial type stuff. People don't look at artists or videographers and stuff like that as entrepreneurs per se, but they are and that they do. They offer up free work to build up their portfolio to ultimately get job later on. So you know that happens. Naturally with other professions. I just don't know. Corporate America doesn't hopped on that way because you can go to an interview all you want. Yeah, you can fake it for forty five minutes and then they give you the job. Or nepotism happens where they give a job to their nephew or some shit like that. You know that person not right for the job. But you know if you give somebody who's built up a rapport through actually showing you what they could do and as a different definitely. And on the flip side of the entrepreneur thing, I was just talking to somebody else about it, how it's like now kids are growing up and they don't necessarily want to be like an athlete or celebrity and they want to be like an entrepreneur. Like. What do you think about that? I think it's a beautiful thing that. I think kids now are getting them to a space where they're realizing there's more than just being an athlete or an entertainment. The world has been condensed because of our phone, so we're able to see more and no more and be more knowledgeable about what's the possibility and more or less that's what do mode is all about is helping people realize that there's more out here to be had and if you want to find your space, if you're good at knitting, then you know, we shouldn't be putting you in classes where you just you do an accounting work. We should be putting you in classes where you can exercise your talents and let you flourish and help you. You know, the business stuff will come down the line, but at the very least put you in spaces where you could thrive doing what you do best. And I think we're we're getting towards that and I think like there's a market for everything and like, like you just said, like knitting, like someone could go knit something like put a youtube video on how they made it and make it like make the video dope and then like their channel way blow up.

They're making like crazy captions about like what they're sewing, like what they're making from sewing or something like that. But sure, and you mentioned the beginning, your graduate student at Yale. So how did that all come about and what's it been like going to Yale? Being a graduate student? A Yo is well as a start on how I got there, I was working at Yo and I was able to get ingratiated in the community by just being an employee. And then while being an employee, you get to kind of just be exposed to some of these dope people that are in the community and it's like diag like if I could just be affiliated with these people outside of just being an employee, to be dope of my mind shifted towards just being around them and employee capacity to possibly being able to, you know, get into school. But it had never been a thought for me because I'm a very average individual, hence the name of my podcast. Things the average, it's like, and your guess do evers this average, but it's like. So I never thought that Yale or any Ivy League was a possibility for me. But now, being around these people and have a conversation with them, they put me in a different mind frame. Like, you know what, these people are regular too. I could at very least shoot my shot and see what happens. And I put my bid in, I put my application in and I got in. And what is like? It is very much so what you would think. Yeah, is very rigorous, a very time consuming. I see why most people do this. Only this is their fulltime thing. They don't do anything else that they basically put life on pause while they're here. And where I'm not doing that, I have other things going on that are very near and dear to me so that I can't put them down. So it makes it that much harder and do mold baby, this is what I do. So now, yeah, what's it? What's it like being like a soon again, like, what's the purchase of saying you'RE A student? When you mentioned Yale, People's ears perk up a little bit. I've definitely met some people who I wouldn't have otherwise met if I wasn't a student, and Yale is no secret. They are blessed to have the resources that most other institutions don't have, so I'm able to utilize those types of things. Like, for instance, one of my other classes. Last week I was reading for a class and I was writing. We had to do this discussion writing for it. I got kind of charged up through the reading, which I don't normally do, but it was that intense of a reading that I got charged as I had a million questions that I was prepared to bring to class the next day. And, Lo and behold, where I got the class, the author of the book was in our class and I was able to ask him these questions directly and have a conversation with him after class and pick his brains. So those are the types of things that other institutions, you know, what other place you're going to go to where you are signed reading and then the author of a very wellknown book is in the class with you the next day, right that your fingerships to be able to...

...answer anything, all questions that you have and what in the speak with you afterwards, you know. So it's this stuff like that that yell has the ability to do and on top of being able to just meet, you know, some cool people. Yeah, definitely actually check that podcast out. yesters, I know exactly what you're talking about. And and yeah, even like people that live around here, like, I mean even me, like there's like a lot of free events that in like big people go to Yale and like people don't even really know about it, like and they could just go. Yeah, I mean, yeah, I offers up so many things that people just don't have any idea about. And me too, I mean me included, being in Bridgeport, willn't fall from a like twenty, twenty five minutes away from you and never really visit it in until I started working there. And then, once I work there, kind of got the leg up on being able to know what was available because, you know, you get emails and stuff like that, and then I really took advantage by going out and actually a meeting people, which is something that was foreign to me, again, being an introvert. Those are things that we tend not to do, but we miss out on a lot of opportunities by not being able to jump out there and go meet people. Hence why do mode? The company is so needed, because it allows people to not have to go out there and jump in front of somebody's face, but instead the resources kind of get brought to you and digital fashion, so I'm able to let you know, if my experience is what's happening here and therefore you now know about it and you know you're listener is know about it now, and so on and so forth. So this, this new age of sharing information, has parts, I mean as some cons to it too, but you know, for the most part it has is perks. If you, you know, sit through the bullshit. Definitely. And why did you create the famously average podcast and also, why didn't you name it Hashta Dem prodect? The things we have was podcast. Came about two years ago with my buddy Jr, who's in real estate investments, and you know, he was just talking about it got to the point where we're on the same wavelength about leveling nothing life. I think at the core of everything will do mode is about. It's about people trying to level up in some capacity. It's not just about introversies, not just about entrepreneurs, but it's about people trying to do more with what they're giving. And so it's like he was talking about he wanted to leave his job and going to real estate. I was talking about that I wanted to create a business that inspire people to do what they wanted to do in terms of their passions and career moves, and we were like Yo, and we had these we were having conversations like this often, you know. So it was like, you know, we got start recording. It's them, and that turned into the podcast. We just did it one day and the famously average, the name came from us, really just got pulled out the sky. It wasn't anything premeditated. It was kind of just something that came organically.

You know, we're to average individuals trying to live famously man, trying to get it the best way we know how and care our experiences. The reason why I didn't call that Hashtag Demo podcast is because originally I didn't want it to be affiliated with Hash that Demo. I wanted it to be a free space to talk about whatever and Hashad motives. Though it is very diverse in the networking aspects and career fields, is not really a space where we talked about like contemporary topics and stuff like that, where the podcast allows for that outlet. So we talked about modern stuff. We don't just talk about entrepreneur type stuff. We talked about, you know, current topics. We talk about life at Yale. We talk about real estate and how is going for him and in a slow time like a wintertime, and his childs and tribulations as a new real estate investor, and we get people on there that have their real life experiences and, you know, we sometimes we just shoot the shit to we just, you know, we bullshit, we we curse, sweet we laugh. We got joke, but we try to wrap it around some some advice to give our listeners to take home every week and be able to help them motivate and get through their week. Yeah, definitely, and and I know you're still trying to figure out how strue first pay their taxes. Yeah, that's one of the things I'm really interested in is tax season right now. And we talked about the stripper bowl, when it was a super bowl down in Atlanta, how the strippers and one particular club made three million dollars and they splitted amongst each other, which gave them a hundred and Twentyzeros each. And I'm like, what did they file out on doing their taxes? It is chill for the rest of the year. Now they could. That was large debate on our podcast, was like whether or not these people just chill or do they go back at house more because it's just tax three dollars is are they able to just account for some of it? You know, I'm sure that a lot of that type of stuff goes on. So, yeah, we looking for an attack accounting that you know who's savvy enough to know about those things, and we look at it more like a waitress or, you know, a barber or anybody works in the beauty side of things where it's like you get a cash business and how much of that do you really report? And so that's interesting. People are definitely obviously doing that stuff. But I actually heard that only three percent of people get audited and six percent of people get audited when they refile their taxes. I'll say that one was and the people get audited and six percent get audited and when they refile, yeah, was a refile. Like. So if you go in the past years, like say, so it's two thousand and nineteen. So if you did like a two thousand and seventeen one now, like, if you read it, it like you messed up. Do it or got you got you, yea. So the met the the moral of the stories. Don't refile. No, I'm just saying you're the chances are slim hill. Those are the things. I don't know. So those are the type of things that we talked about on the famously average where we do deep...

...dives on show like that. So that could be considered do more type stuff. I guess it's one way to look at it, but we just chalk that up to us being famously average just trying to figure some shit out. Yeah, definitely. Are you ready for some fun questions? Give me. All right, I know it's kind of early, but who you think should be in the final four? What depends of Duke has I on? If they don't, I believe they're out. I'm liking the way Olsu is playing right now, not to mention they has somebody from Connecticut on eighteen, which is also awesome. So I'm thinking Lsu do maybe I want to say UN see just because, and I'll go with a throw in all. That's three ACC teams. I don't know. I was on, say Virginia, but maybe three ACY seatingsout. Say Virginia, who cares no rules against this shit, and I mean obviously we don't know what the brackets are looking like right, all right, well, who are who would be the fifteen? Then the Duke doesn't get a heaven. If dries have Zi on the WHO are you picking from? Like the Doltin Salson a tennis I think Tennessee has a bunch of bothers on that team, and so I'll say Tennessee. Now we'll go at that. What about top three? Jersey? Is that you want? That you don't have? I want to Home Charlotte Point. It's Larry Johnson Jersey with the pain stripes. I want a want to o Vancouver Grizzlies Jersey and I want to Mike Vic. No idea on sanders throw back Atlanta Hawks Jersey. I'm Atlanta Falcon Jersey, not hawks yet he that'd be interesting. If you want to be Customize Hawks Jersey into Dan Sanders Jersey, I could do that. That'll be a way too. And what about last one? What are something people don't know about you? I mean, I know we pretty much talked about a lot of things, but if people don't know about me, Um, give a special hobby that nobody knows about. I like the knit on my free time. Not I don't have special I mean I do. My life is pretty much surround around do mode. But, contrary to popular belief, I don't like speaking. How much I get drained. It kind of Zapps the energy out of me. So after podcast or after stuff like this, I tend to be kind of quiet and reserved when I'm alone or, you know, just with friends and stuff. So that maybe one thing that people tend not to realize about me after you know, hear me. Gotcha. And where can people find you? On Social Media? On instagram I'm tripple up underscorge AB. Make sure you spell triple right. I've had a lot of people not knowing how to spell triple. So it's tripled up. UNDERSCORE JB on instagram. Podcast page is at the underscore, famously average on ig and we're have live whole episodes on Youtube to so you can watch our PODCAS if you prefer watching it, and we're soundcloud and itunes and you can check out Hashtag to mode. Our website is at Hashtag...

...to modecom. We got videos and articles up there to help motivate aspire. We also have a shop if you care to purchase and doom mode gear. And, yeah, facebook and all that stuff for the same stuff. So people know how to find you nowadays if they really want to get to you. So all that stuff on it, for sure, and appreciate your coming on. Appreciates you having a man for sure. This episode was powered by receptor naturals. My name is boss Ruten and here are my top three reasons why I love receptor. First, when I stopped taking prescription paint bills in two thousand day, I didn't have anything to replace them with until I discovered Receptra, which has helped me a lot. Second, if I have a long drive in front of me, I take it before I start driving. Why? Because it keeps my mind and my back muscles more relaxed, and that makes it easier for me to deal with idiots in traffic. Third, if I really want to push myself, I take it before a workout, because it helps with less selected as it build up, and that means I can push myself much harder. Those are my top three reasons. God speed,.

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