Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 1 month ago

Jordan Norwood | Average to Savage EP178

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and seventy-eighth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring entrepreneur Jordan Norwood. Paul Guarino talked with Jordan Norwood discussing his NFL career, getting into NFTs, and creating his own project The Whitelist Aces.   

Follow Jordan Norwood https://www.instagram.com/Jordanorwood This podcast interview with Jordan Norwood was originally recorded on November 9, 2022

This is the Average to Savage Podcast with Paul Guerrino, Everyone and anyone, athletes, celebs, and much more. What's up, everybody, Welcome back to another episode of the Average Savage Podcast. Our special guest today is Jordan Norwood. Jordan, how's it going. I'm doing well, doing great man. How are you doing fall dude? I appreciate you coming on. Thanks for having me. Man, I'm excited. Yeah for sure. Let's just go back in time a little bit. How what was it like your first memory of playing football? Oh? Man, um, goodness, back in time for real. My first memory of playing football? Um. So, my dad's a college football coach, um, and he has been pretty much my whole life, just about. But my first memory is in Richmond, Virginia. I started playing flag football and um, it's actually running out. So you know how in like youth football, you'll run out of like a piece of paper. The team will run out, um, like in a line of cheerleaders, and you'll run out in the middle. So we ran through the piece of paper and I was in the back and I tripped and fell and busted my mouth open on the like as somebody's cleat was kicking up um so that's that's my first that's my first memory. That's my first memory, a bloody lip. And then I saw in your Wikipedia did you were you were born in Hawaii? I was. Yes. My my dad played college football University Hawaii. My mom is born and raised Hawaii. All of our families from there, and uh yeah, yeah I was born in Hawaii. That's so. How how long were you like there for? Um? I was there till I was about six years old. Yeah. Have you have you gone back since? Uh? Yeah, we've We've been back quite a bit. Um. I used to go back pretty much every year there for a while, but um, at this point it's been I think it's been about five years, five or six years since I've been back to Hawaii. So I need to make that happen. That's dope, But just I mean I was wanting to visit Hawaii. Never never been there. Um. I remember I did like a project and like I don't even know, like the sixth grade or something about Hawaii, So I don't really remember it, but yeah I did it. So yeah anyways, um yeah, so then just tell me about your your football career. Uh, in terms of like recruiting process out of high school. Uh. Yeah, so there wasn't a huge process for me. Um. I was a first of all, it was somebody that bounced around quite a bit, uh in my in high school. So I went to high school UM in Texas and then in Pennsylvania. UM. So that kind of affects your recruiting a little bit. But I was also like five nine hundred forty five pounds my senior year high school. So UM, not heavily recruited. UM. Also played basketball in high school, and we want to stay championship in basketball UM in Pennsylvania. So I I got some looks for basketball. UM. And really, if I wouldn't have gone, I ended up going to Penn State. If I wouldn't have gone to Penn State, UM, I would have went to buck Now University and played football and basketball. UM. That was probably my my biggest opportunity. UM. And then Penn State kind of came in late and you know offered me the opportunity to uh do what's called gray shirting there um for football. UM. So I took that opportunity. Yeah for sure. What was your what was your time like at Penn State? Like on an off the field, it was great, man, I mean, first of all, I got there, you know, undersized and um and all that, and and took a took a year for me to you know, put on some weight and muscle for me to be even be able to get on the football field. Um. But yeah, being a kid, my dad was on the coaching staff at the time, so I was, you know, basically a local kid. I went to high school my last couple is a high...

...school, you know, right down the street from Penn State. UM, so already, um, you know, kind of had a little friend group. Um. A lot of kids from my high school also also go to Penn State because of that proximity. But um, yeah, it was it was great. I mean there's there's nothing like um, you know, a Penn State football white out, Um, you know, a hundred ten thousand fans. Um. There's also nothing like um, you know, just going to school and being in a social environment with a lot of people that I went to high school with. Um, so it was a pretty unique experience. Um, you know, all while having my parents right down the road to if I needed a home cooked meal or some laundry or anything like that. Yeah, definitely, Um yeah, yeah, what was it? What was it like being coached by Joe Patterner, the legendary, incredible man. I mean legendary is um, you know, there's probably a better word than legendary that that we can find because he's I mean just one of a time man. He just um, not only from the coaching aspect. I mean he was, you know, all of eighty years old while while I was when I was there at Penn State, and he was you know, out on the field every single practice, coaching people, hollering at people, um, you know, doing his best to show people physically how you know, a certain technique needed to be done. But aside from that, just an incredibly personable person, somebody that cared a lot about um, individual humans, whether they were coaches or staff or or football players, student athletes. Um, he just cared a lot. And you know, actually my sophomore year at it, or the end of my freshman year at Penn State, I came into Joe's office to ask him if if he would let me play basketball because I wanted to play basketball al so at Penn State, and um, the basketball team invited me to I was like an invited walk on to play and know I was, I was scared. I thought Joe was gonna like get mad at me and say no way. But he was like, yeah, you know, after this this next football season, if your grades are still up, and go for it. Um. So I mean I was. I always thought that was pretty cool of him to react that way and to give me that, um, you know, opportunity to play basketball, which I really wanted. Yeah, that's dope. I Like when you were saying that, I was expecting him to say, like, hell no, right right the wait, So did you end up doing that? Yeah? Yeah, I ended up playing basketball Penn State. UM. After my sophomore UM football season, I went and played the basketball team. Uh. We weren't very good at basketball. Didn't win one game by the time I got there. We didn't win one game. So, um, I didn't contribute much, but I was out there. That's loco. You could still say you were two sport athlete in college, right yeah. Um yeah. Going back to Joe Paterner, like, as you as like a boss leader now on or of an n f T company, Like, what what have you taken from him from a leadership position? Yeah, there's quite a bit. Um. You know, obviously, if I can put some of it in its words. But UM, I would say his how personable like I mentioned he is, and just how he remembered UM people and always took note Like after conversations he had a notepad. He was taking notes about the person no matter who it was, UM, that he just had a conversation with. And you know he was intentional basically, UM, you know about his relationships, which which is something that I try to emulate. UM. And then aside from that, or along with that, is is the punctuality. There's something UM. At Penn State, if we had a team meeting at you know, eleven PM or eleven am. Goodness, UM, eleven am, the meeting was usually over by eleven eleven am. We had to be there in the team meeting room, you know, I ten fort and Joe would...

...be there waiting for us, and we'd get started as soon as as soon as everybody was in the in the room and we'd usually finished by eleven. So, UM, it was really cool to UM to experience punctuality in that way, and UM, you know that's something I've tried to carry over to Yeah, that's awesome. UM. And then just did you did you always want to be like an NFL player, Was that your goal? Uh No, I wouldn't say so. Um, I think my goals were a little more shortsighted than that. You know, things like winning the next football game, making you know, being a starter, um, you know, running the right route in a play. I mean, my my, my goals were a little more shortsighted. And it wasn't until my my junior year at Penn State. Um, I played as a freshman, played as a sophomore before some for some reason, didn't click in my head that the NFL was a real possibility. Um, you know, until my junior year when I started to see, Um, you know, some of my teammates had one teammate that left early after their junior year, Justin King, And I was like, well, well, I mean if Justin's leaving, I guess I should start thinking about, you know, if the NFL is in the cards for me. So um, yeah, gotcha. And then um, you went to the NFL Combine and um, you went undrafted, but then you you did yet on a team. So what was that whole process like? Uh? Yeah, I mean it was I mean a long kind of ongoing process, to be honest. I mean the NFL combine is one thing. Um, you know I did alright. I didn't do great at the combine. I don't I'm not like a combine guy like I don't have you know, the height and weight and uh you know bench press even the forty time didn't have a great forty times. So, um, you know, my my abilities show better on a football field a basketball court then you know in a lab where people are measuring you. Um. So, so yeah, I go undrafted. I ended up end up signing with the Cleveland Browns as a rookie undrafted free agent. Um. Actually end up getting cut in Cleveland my rookie year, go to Philadelphia, try to make the or mid year, I go to Philadelphia and I'm on their practice squad. Uh. And then the next season, my my second year in the NFL, I get cut in Philadelphia. Um. So, basically, without going too far into how much I was cut and resigned and cut and resigned, UM, there's a lot of that. So when it comes to making a football team, it's not something that you know just happened once and you know then you know my NFL career was set or something. I had to make a football team every single year for each of the um, you know, each of the eight years I was, you know, trying to make it in the NFL, so um, you know, really just an ongoing, um, you know, perseverance battle of of trying to make football teams. Yeah. Then like what were you, like so since you weren't like say, quote unquote like focused on making the NFL, like you were just kind of mentioned like did you have something that you're already working on too, like job wise or entrepreneurship bids? Um, well, I mean I wasn't focused my first couple of years in college. I would say by my junior year. Um, my junior year in college, I was, UM, my track, my my track of mind was only on the NFL. UM. I was an advertising major and UM graphics and did some graphic design. I didn't finish that degree, but UM in college also so kind of my it wasn't really a backup plan because there was no plan here. But UM, you know I did envision myself, you know, owning like a boutique advertising agency. UM. You know that did a lot of graphic design work for um, you know, companies and brands. UM. So that that is something that I always kind of envisioned for myself at some point, dope. Um. Yeah,...

...and then you you played for the Broncos and you won Super Bowl fifty, UM with Payon Manning. What what was that whole experience like playing with paying Manning winning the Super Bowl? Incredible? It was? It was incredible, man. I mean, uh, from from being on um you know rosters that UM you know, never went to the playoffs or um. You know, being on you know, the Cleveland Browns for three years and not really having an opportunity to play much first of all, um, but also not winning very many games. Uh. Two, then you know, transition over to the Broncos and uh, you know, somehow find myself in a um, you know, starting slot receiver position with the Broncos. UM winning games and obviously going to the Super Bowl and winning it UM alongside you know, players like Peyton Manning and von Miller and DeMarcus ware Um and Damarius Thomas, you know, is incredible. I mean UM, and you know, off the field, getting to know those guy eyes and befriend those guys. UM. You know, it's also something that I will cherish, you know, for the rest of my life. Yeah, for sure, I mean I feel like most Crows that retire say they like. The thing that I missed the most is the camaraderie. Yeah. Yeah, I mean there's there's nothing like it. And and I think another reason that they say that is is because pro sports are grueling. Man. I mean it takes a lot of um, you know, physical time and energy, but also takes you know, just a mental fortitude that UM, I honestly don't really wish on anybody. It's it's it's a tough tough industry to to survive in. UM and sometimes you're just doing that, just just surviving. UM. So yeah, when I when I look back on my sports career, that's not the part I miss. I missed the locker room. I missed my teammates, um. And you know, just some of the off the field memories that that always bring me joy. Yeah, definitely. UM who was your who was the quarterback that that through your first touchdown? Oh man, my first touchdown was caught from Colt McCoy. Um, So, Colt McCoy in Cleveland. UM threw me my first touchdown against UH since at Cincinnati. Yeah. That's dope. I was I was kind of like testing you there. Yeah, no, I I appreciate it's a it's a good memory to to retrieve. Yeah, yeah, definitely. Um And then so you retired young obviously, and um like what we're before n f T is like what were you what were you doing? Uh yeah before n f T. So I retired in two thousand seventeen from the NFL. At that point, um, I had just started kind of digging into a photography career. Um So, even towards the end of my NFL career, I picked up a camera. My wife actually bought me a camera one year when I tore my a c L and I got got pretty heavy into photography. Um So, I was like a guy that would bring my camera on road trips in the NFL. So when everybody's like in their suits and you know, dress real nice about to get on the plane, they would say, hey, Jordan, can you take a couple of pictures for me? So I would take pictures of you know, my teammates. I would hop on the plane, uh, throw the memory card in my computer, you know, edit the pictures real quick, and and send them off to you know, all my teammates. All before we took off. Um, you know, in that like fifteen minutes before we took off, Um, so that my teammates could post their pictures on Instagram or whatever. Um, so I was pretty heavy into photography, um, you know, as I transitioned out of the NFL. UM also was into cryptocurrency at that point. Um, you know, had already made some you know, investments and start to learn what it looked like to trade cryptocurrency. They're back in two thousand and sixteen, uh seventeen, and um, you know I think those kind of too, you know, the creative outlet with graphic design, photo editing, and photography along with um, you...

...know, the growing knowledge of blockchain and cryptocurrencies. Um, you know obviously kind of lead led me into n f t S and web three as we know it now. Yeah, obviously, since I know you a little bit, it all adds up in my head. And then, UM, that's dope that you were doing that too, because I'm sure you know, like that's a huge thing now. The the photos, the walk in photos are like literally like that's like someone's whole job now apparently, so you were kind of doing that before anyone was doing that. So that's dope. Um, all right, So tell me going into the n f T journey. Tell me a little bit about how you got into n f T S and then tell me what your first n FC purchases. Yeah. So yeah, basically, I mean I basically got into n f T S. I mean, most tangibly from my older brother, who's who's a professional athlete plays basketball overseas. Um. You know, he kind of started, um, you know, telling me a little bit more about n f T S Back in two thousand and uh late two thousand twenty early, um, you know, while I was still playing football, I heard about you know, crypto kiddies, and you know, I was wondering what exactly is going on, how this fits in with blockchain and crypto and um and all that. But um, yeah, you know summer, Um, you know, I'm still chatting with my older brother, UM, and we both decide to get into a project called Mars Cats Voyage, UM, which is uh, you know, still one of my favorite projects. But that that was the first project that I mented, Mars Cats Voyage, which was it was like a point oh four eight mint at the time, and um, you know, I mean I had the the juices flowing and I mented like eight or nine or ten of them, I who even knows, but um, you know, still still an awesome project, still kicking and um doing some still cool stuff with their video game over at Mars Cats. Um. So that yeah, that was my first project, and um, you know, soon after that, I'm minted the Humanoids and you know, maybe a couple other projects before going you know, headfirst into the White List ACES, which is the project that I founded, and um, you know stopped really having time for myself after that. Yeah, definitely. And then yeah, one what made you want to create your own project? Then? Too? How did how did you come up with the White List Aces? Um? Yeah, so, I mean in terms of wanting to create my own project, I mean just super into the space. Um. You know, I'm a collector at heart. Also, I grew up collecting trading cards as an adult, started collecting sneakers. Um, so I am a collector at heart also. Um, but yeah, I really wanted to create an n f T membership that um, you know, focused on in real life utility, that you know, also had awesome art. So um, I didn't see many brands or projects out there that had um, you know, this trio of awesome art. Um, an awesome community and awesome utility, um in real life utility specifically, um you know, which I think board Ape, which is the reason that board Ape is is so um you know, reputable because they have that trio. Um. You know, I saw a lot of projects that had great art, um, but no utility or um you know, a great community and cool utility, but the art was kind of like so so um. So it was really just trying to create this branding project that had those three things. Um. And in terms of the white lists, uh specifically, UM, you know, just looking for um you know uh or really like seeing this word the white List that you know, there's some combativeness around, um you know, racial combativeness, combativeness around the word white list, and really...

...wanted to take that word and um kind of flip it on his head and say, hey, I'm a black founder, black and Filipino founder, and you know I can use this word and like it's no big deal. Like, um, I just wanted to stand up on it and say, you know, I kind of retake this word and we're going to use it as our brand name. UM. So yeah, I mean that's that's kind of the basis for the White List Aces collection. Um, you know, the word ACES came later. It's it's a word coined by one of our discord members. We kind of voted on what we would call our character and we decided to call them ACES, which we we decided is short for access Um. And that's you know, that's kind of the way we're running with it. Yeah, that's dope. And then how how long was the process? Um, like from thinking about the name and then creating all the art and then like the launch, Like how many months or how many months did that take? Yeah? So UM the timeline of UM, that process for me was really create. I mean I kind of created like a really short white paper UM approach to artists UM that I was just enamored with at um Benny Benjamin Cole and Daniel Groho Tolski. Uh. They're both UM located in Munich in Germany. UM. They do a project and had already launched a project called The Drops, which the artwork of I was just um, you know, in awe of and and you know they're basically the individuals that I had tapped to be a part of the white list and kind of lead the art direction. UM. So I you know, got in contact with them through d M just hounding them, and eventually they got on a call with me, you know, kind of explained my vision and they were like okay, sure, like cool. Um, you know, a week or two goes by, I don't hear from the UM, and I'm like, okay, I don't think that. You know, I came strong enough, and UM, so I put together like this twenty five page white paper basically that was put together really nicely. UM. You know, used as much of my graphic design skills as I could. UM. You know, got them back on a call and they were like, okay, we see the vision now. UM, you know we're in UM. And so that's how they became my creative director and art art director respectively. UM. And yeah, that was that was late October. UM. By by about you know, December one, we had a lot of the artwork, UM, you know, decided on not quite creative, but decided on. UM. There's I mean so much learning that had to happen, UM, so much time and money that I didn't realize needed to be spent to accomplish something like this. But but in all it was you know about a four month process. Three month process. We we minted on January thirty one. UM, so that's about um, you know, four months from conception to um, you know, having all the n f T s ready and the smart contract ready and and going to Mike. Yeah. I mean I would say that's pretty fast. It was really fast. And uh in terms of like the people that don't know like web three and whatever you want to call this n F two world, like everything moves extremely fast. UM. So that's also just like crazy things. So how how long didn't you guys sold down? Like twenty four hours, forty eight hours? Uh less than that. So we we had a like a pre sale white list cell that was twelve hours long, um. And so twelve hours of white list sale, which sold about six of our ten thousand piece collection, and then when we opened it up to the...

...public sale at the end of that, it's sold the remaining um you know whatever thirty cent or so sold out in about three or four minutes. Um. So if we're looking at public sale, we sold out in like five minutes. Um. But you know with the white list sell there, um, it took about twelve hours. So yeah, yeah that's awesome. UM. And then what what was like, um the road say, like what was your roadmap like originally? And then how much has it like changed since? Yeah? I mean so the roadmap originally was UM, you know, focused on in real life UM, sporting events and opportunities UM, as well as travel events are not travel events, but travel opportunities, whether it be lodging or air fare, those sorts of things. UM. All opportunities focused at people coming together in real life UM and spending time together. Right UM The days and weeks following men are just straight up k us. UM. You know with people UM that I have no idea who they are UM complaining about. You know, why hasn't this n f T doubled in price UM in value immediately? UM? So you know, basically, as a founder, you quickly realized that the people that UM you thought were buying into your vision UM you know, long term vision for you know this aces membership were not. They were really just buying into speculation UM. And when you didn't you know, fulfill their speculative desires UM. You know, they're looking for an exit UM at any costs. So UM. You know. Anyways, and in terms of how the roadmap has shifted, UM, you know, it hasn't really shifted a whole lot. Some of the ways we execute it has has shifted. You know, we haven't, um, we have not relied on, um, the opinion of you know, random person in some random part of the world that isn't really interested in the utility of this project. UM. You know, at first, we were really relying on their opinion to direct um, you know, some of the utility we we would provide UM. But when we you know, quickly learned that they didn't really care about the utility UM so far as to say it increase the floor price for example. You know, we started to kind of take the project back into you know, our UM and by our I mean myself and um, you know, my teammates vision and really start to um, you know, hone in on uh you know, those sporting events and travel opportunities, UM, and kind of get back to the root of all that. Yeah. Definitely, UM, yeah, it's definitely an interesting worlds and journey. It's like experience it too, obviously not working for meta fans and things like that, and just yeah, it's just like a lot of weird thing like yeah, like one person, it might just be like one person that says like accident, but like the majority of people say that, and then that one persons that happy. But basically, in the end, just like in life in general, you can't make everybody happy. Absolutely, it is a great a great phrase to live by. Yeah, definitely. UM. And then tell me a little bit about how you guys acquired the Big three team power UM and then how to like I think you guys did a vote correct with the community. Uh yeah, I mean we we were we vote on a lot of things UM and and we're definitely voting on a lot of things there UM. Last spring as we had you know, this community wallet and we were watching um you know the value of ether plummet UM. So we're like, you know, how what what can we put this community um? You know these funds into UM. So you know we've we voted on you know, things like buying a board ape um, you know, which we didn't do, buying a Clone X, which we did do UM. And you know one of the things that was you know, pretty early on in our ethos and kind of did sires was you know, owning a sports franchise.

We you know, we always said how cool would would it be if, um, you know we could own you know, a piece of a team, and you know, we thought that that would be something that was you know, five years off down the road. Um, you know, we would maybe be able to scrounge up enough you know cash to be a minority owner in an NBA team or um, you know NFL team or something or MLS team even Um. But you know, this opportunity presented itself with the Big Three. They started launching what they called their Fire Tier n f t s, which represent ownership in you know, in their UM in their teams. And UM, you know we saw Snoop Dogg. You know, press release come out that Snoop Doggs bought a team. You know, a couple of days later, a press release comes out that um, Gary V buys a team. Then UM, then Krausshouse Dow then um, you know the moon Birds. Um. Then there's you know, a group of basy Board eight holders that bought a team. So UM, you know we're just you know, trying to get in. Like. UM, you know, I have a couple of a couple of friends that play in in the Big Three. So I tapped them and you know, hey, who can I who can I contact at the Big Three to um, you know, kick the tires on on the white list Asis purchasing the necessary n f T s for ownership, and um, you know, we we went back and forth a few times. We um you know, felt like the deal was you know, lost a couple of times. And this is all over the course of two weeks. UM, but yeah, we we found our way in and um, you know, a big portion of that deal was finalized with the with the our white list asist community wallet. Um. And then you know, a few we had to piece together, um a little bit more of the funding so that that came from me personally, UM, a couple other investors, and we were able to piece together enough um, you know cash to be able to to acquire the Power, which we're super super power, super happy about, uh and excited about. So yeah, I mean, well, one, I've been following the Big Three and I think it's like a cool concept. Bring old players and new players and like you know, maybe players from overseas into the into the fold and uh like old players and then like the managers and things like that, like Nancy Lieberman, Nancy Lieberman as your guys, um, so that's like cool. And then you guys went, I think the Power one before to like the championship. Yeah, the Power One, UM, I think it was in the second season Power One the Championship. Then we went back to the championship this year and lost, um to Trilogy. And I mean, but it was just an incredible opportunity and um, exciting experience to say the least. Um, you know, have a way for our n f T community and membership to get together and kind of rally behind a team. And um, you know, acquiring that team early in the summer, literally a week before the season started. Um, you know, it was cool and all, but you know, we didn't really have an opportunity to make the team our own or um you know, monetize any of the um exposure that the team gets. UM. I mean because the Big Three gets you know, incredible viewership on CBS. Uh and they just renewed their deal with CBS. So I mean they get like five hundred thousand two over over a million people we're watching our our Big Three championship games. So there's a big opportunity there, UM, you know, from a sponsorship, endorsement, UM, you know, branding perspective, UM that we're really looking to take advantage of this. This upcoming season. So, uh, do the players stay on the team or they get redrafted in the pool. Both. So there's there's a couple of players that are deemed captains and co captains that we have, um, we have the chance to retain on a yearly bag asist and then um, the other there's five...

...players on a team total. Uh, the other two or three players get put back into the draft pool, um, or not the draft pool, but the I'll call it the free agent pool. And you know, we have the opportunity to to add from that pool, um to the remainder of our roster. God, that's it. That's gonna be cool this offseason. Then yeah, we'll see, man, I mean we'll see what you know, what guys aren't on NBA rosters, Um right, I mean I know the name Dwight Howard is getting kicked around a bit like, um, you know, it'll be really cool and interesting, could be a part of Yeah, yeah for sure. Are you gonna are you gonna do that voting style as well? Um? Yeah, well we'll see. I mean, um, you know another cool thing is that we get to name like CEO and general manager of the team. Um, so you know, our our GM will have a little bit more power on on who that um, you know, who these additions are to our team that um that we're making. But I mean it's definitely gonna be an exciting process. UM. We want to get back to the championship. Like it's that's what it's about for us. It's winning games and going to the championship. UM. So we're we're not you know, we might not be looking for the flashy name and if they're if they're not the name that can you know bring us wins. So yeah, yeah, definitely UM. And then what does the future look like for the white list as is? Uh? Yeah, so we I mean currently we're we're finishing up our stake in contract where people will be able to stake UM their ACE n f T, which is basically putting their ACE n f T into another wallet UM that's controlled by our team or it's actually controlled by a staking contract and earning what we're calling keys, which are coins that they can earn to spend on our marketplace. So we're building that whole infrastructure out right now, and the steak in contract actors are actually finished just finishing the user interface UM and then on a more tangible level. We're working on UH sponsorships endorsement deals with our Big three power team, which will create revenue for our community wallet. UM. And we're also building a we're minority owners in a vacation rental in Touloum, Mexico that will finish in February, which will have you know, exclusive days for um ACE holders to book stays there. Uh. They'll use these key coins that they'll earn from staking their ACE to book stays in too loom. UM. And we'll look to purchase and invest in more vacation rental properties around the world, UM, you know, in also at least that's that's the plan is to find a new city, whether it's Lisbon or Singapore, UM, you know, or Hannesburg, um, you know, find find a couple more cities to invest in over the next two and three years. And then UM. What a curious question, like have you tried to get any of your former teammates into n f T s and they're just like they're not like nah. Um Yeah, well, first of all, yes, I have, UM, I think some of it. I mean it's it's a difficult, Um, it's a difficult sell sometimes, but I mean we have we have we have a lot of guys, UM and females in our in our membership at this point. UM. You know, how active they are is a different story. UM. But I think it just comes down to, you know, creating utility that is valuable to them, you know, which is why we're looking at these UM properties in indesirable vacation towns and cities. UM. You know, if I go to, you know, a former teammate, I won't say, I won't even say a name. But if I if I go to a former teammate and say, hey, you know, you know, make sure you stake...

...your n f T and here's the instructions on how to do that. UM, and make sure you do this so that you can you know, book you know, you're staying at our house and tooloom whenever you want to. UM. You know that's the easier sell than UM, you know, make sure you stake your n f T so you can get white list to this other n f T project. Uh. You know, I mean there's that's just not a whole lot of value to somebody that doesn't unnecessarily care about the n f T game like a lot of us do. So we're we're working that out. Yeah, yeah, for sure. Um yeah, I mean I've had like I think, you know, I work with athletes, so I had like when the you know, when it was at the high point, everyone's like hit me up to like make their own n F T s and do all that stuff. And I was like, it's not it's not like it's not like selling a T shirt. Like that's what they were like kind of thinking. Um, so I had to you know, explain it to them and take a step back. But yeah, it's just an interesting world anyways. In general, as you know, are you ready for some fun questions? Absolutely? Manics to it all, right, Who's who's let's say, like who's like a couple of players that you wish you played, say like a quarterback that you wish you like caught a ball from. Um, great question. I wish I would have. I think it would have been cool. For some reason, I just think it would be cool to play with Philip Rivers. Um. I just think his personality is I just it's just one that I want to see up close. Um, he's always somebody that was like, you know, yelling at the referees or um, you know, very emotional players, So I think that would have been cool. Um. More historically, I would have loved to UM played with Randall Cunningham. Dope, dope. UM, I think you said you were a sneaker head, right. I was a recovering sneaker head for a while, and now I'm now I'm getting back in the game, like literally just as a as of a year. So give me your top five like favorite sneakers, top five favorite sneakers. Um, I'm going to go with um, Nike harachis basketball. Harachis not the running shoes, the basketball harachis the original Harachis. Um Air Jordan three dorm Bocker's Um, that all red pair of Jordan's threes. Um, let's go with cool gray elevens air Jordan Elevin's cool Gray. Um, my number one pair of shoes is still gray air Jordan's tens. Those are my my first UM, my first pair of pair of Jordan's was We're Tens back when I was probably like in fourth grade. Um. And last pair of sneakers to round out um A top five would be I'm gonna go with Kobe's Crazy eights. UM, a pair that I never have had, but Adida's Crazy eights all right, so that's dope. Um. I like Jordan's fives and and ones and I just got I've been wanting them. The Lebron Retro twos just came out, so that's a great pair of shoes too, Like, I think those are the most ones that are like look like you could actually wear instead of because you know, like all the basketball shoes are like actually performance shoes now instead of like sneakers. Yeah yeah, sneaking. Yeah. So I'm excited to wear those that I got them in the navy blue and white, so I'm a Yankees fans, nice man. Yeah, I did have those back in the day, all right, I got rid of them. Yeah. Uh. Last question, what's your favorite like like cheat meal cheap meal? Um, let's go with.

I mean, is is ramen noodles a cheap meal? I think? So? Yeah, I think instant ramen. I like ramen, but the cheap meal version is just instant ramen. Um, So that's what I'm gonna go with. Oh no, oh, you thought I said cheap. I said cheap meal. Cheap cheap Yeah oh yeah yeah, Well I guess they were kind of one one and the same for me, but cheap meal. Um, I'm like a five guys burgers, burgers and fries. That greasy paper bag, um just does something for me. All right, Well, Jordan, I appreciate you coming on. Could you let the listeners know where they can follow you at? Yeah, you can follow me at Jordan's or would at that's Twitter and Instagram that's j O R d A N O R w O O d um. And you can follow the white List on Instagram m at the white List dot io. Um. We're actually about to change our branding to the Aces, so that might change here pretty quickly. But um the white List dot io on Instagram and the white List io on Twitter. H.

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