Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 1 year ago

Kosha Dillz | Average To Savage EP128

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and twenty-eight episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring artist Kosha Dillz. Paul Guarino talked with Kosha Dillz discussing his rap career, his big break in a Super Bowl commercial, and how he got in NBA 2K as a playable character.

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This podcast interview with Kosha Dillz was originally recorded on June 3, 2021

This is the Average to Savage podcast with paul Guerrino. Everyone in anyone athletes, celebs and much more. Okay yeah. Really? This episode is brought to you by Manscaped who is the best men's below the waist grooming champions of the world. Manscaped offers precision engineered tools for your family jewels. Manscaped just launched their fourth generation trimmer, the lawnmower four point oh, you heard that right? The 4.0, join The two million men worldwide who trust Manscaped with this exclusive offer for you 20% off and free worldwide shipping with the code PG at Manscaped dot com, Get 20% off and free shipping with the code PG and Manscaped dot com. That's 20% off. Free shipping at Manscaped dot com and use the code Pg unlock your confidence and always use the right tools for the job with landscape. What's up everybody? I'm back for another episode of the average Savage podcast. Our special guest today is kosher. Dills, kosher. How's it going? Good bro. Sorry, I feel like I'm just like I started out yawning, I'm I'm out of it. I just got the vaccine so I feel like pulverized but you know, I'm dressing to impress bro, Average the Savage, I'm trying to average the legendary but yeah, average established the first step. I like that. Well I appreciate you coming on. I know we've known each other for your for a few months now you wrote, you wrote the Average Savage song for me Fire am I released it? A semi released it? I didn't officially recently released yet, but maybe I'll release it with the episode and will be boom, Beautiful, beautiful, I love it. You use some of it and that's how you know these songs is you know like you got, you got a big song and they use seven seconds and like the hit show, you know, I mean you've got this great you know and then everyone finds out song you know so I'm happy to be part of it. Yeah definitely. Um Now just going back in your background, you grew up in New Jersey you could just give me a little bit more background and then how you got into music. Yes I grew up in New Jersey. In Jersey. Born and raised um My whole family immigrated from Israel Um in the 70s. I was born in 81 and um grew up Edison New Jersey, home of Gary Vaynerchuk and uh I think a couple other couple of the great people as well and you know I grew up playing soccer um And wrestling wrestling was my thing. Um I wrestled from the age of eight to the age of 20 in college going all the way up to you know Rutgers for you know scholarship for wrestling to be part of that wrestling team. Um And um Being part of like the athletic N. C. Double A. You know division one community is a big...

...thing. Um And you know the wrapping stuff sort of happened sort of in high school I loved wrestling, I loved fighting one on one with people and that sort of led to rap battles and rap battles was the thing. There were no shows who just battle the people at a rap battle and you're on stage for your two minutes and then you get off and you know you you wait for the next turn for the next round and that's how I kind of got started really battles you know writing for battles Back in the day and and freestyling and you know to the point where I started releasing music and like 05 all the way up until today. Um And you know in between there was you know the story of like jails and addiction, I got sober at 22, I'm turning 23 but like my life was definitely rough in those I would say like after high school and pre getting sober um and you know, just navigating in the world of music of what I always really wanted to do um and that was to be on stage and like say my piece and tell my story For sure. So you stopped wrestling at 20 like while you were in college and then is that when you picked up music? Yeah, like not like I was rapping like I had started battling, I was 17 and 18 and I was killing the wrestling team that like that wrapped and um you know, I was going, you know on the weekends to places like open mics in new york city, um and New Jersey and New Brunswick and just getting familiar in the rap scene, you know, I mean, just like making a name for myself at the time, I was going by Katie Flow, um I was originally named kosher Dill, just like straight up kosher Dill and then people have made fun of me and then the next time I want to say, I changed to Katie Flow and so that's what we gotta roll with. Um And from there, you know, after I got, you know, sober and came out of jail and shit, like, the idea was all right, I'm a really embraced kosher Dills, which was like, partly sexual, partly jewish, partly, you know, my, my heritage, and then also like the hustler street guy too. So I had the a instead of the er zine instead of the s and you know I love, you know that's what hip hop is about, you know the double, you know the triple meanings, double meanings of stuff. Um So who are you like inspirations like music wise? Um You know, so I grew up wrap it with this kid yak yak balls. Um If you get to listen to his music and he's it's just legendary rapper. And like I kind of grew up on this group called cannibal Ox. She's like by L. P. From run the jewels, had a record label called deaf jokes and like my dream was to be honest label. It's like, you know my first single was a song called chainsaw music which is like you know horror core rap as a thing. So um besides like Biggie smalls and Tupac and and um you know that was like my...

...core hip hop and blue Tang because I was Edison's like 30 minutes from Staten Island. Mhm. You then have, you know, like, the first cd I bought was original Gun Clappers from Duck Down Records. So this was very new york Brooklyn hip hop At 17, and then also had this kind of little flare of like, shock G from digital underground. And I really loved, like, I love that kind of like, pop flair and kind of like quirkiness, which has become a big part of my style of making really, like, kind of this weird cheesy stuff with making a dope. Um and then sort of going into now where, you know, a lot of the people that influenced me or like my friends, my coworkers, you know, people that I find randomly on the street or playing, and, you know, I'm always searching for inspiration, but at the core of it, you know, wu tang was really like a huge foundation for what I grew up with and biggie smalls and stuff like that. And then it changed into those three things, you know, the hustle mentality of like Jadakiss in the locks and like hustling drugs to like modest yahoo in the Jewish aspect when I first met him and play with him in 2004, And then also going back to like the horror core, um jewish gangster stuff with like necro and nonfiction and elbow. So it's like all these things and I find my place like in the middle of that, you know what I am? Um and you know, I I made it a point to be out there to get inspired. Like I didn't just sit at home, like I went to the stores, I went to the shows, I went to the pop ups and that's you know what what was moving me? You know because of then you couldn't really just be online. Yeah that's what my next point is gonna be. So how did you get yourself out there? Because you were in the pre social media age. I mean the new york city there was something called the U. G. H. H. Dot com message boards and there was a O. L. Chat rooms right? So I was rapping since 98 99 2000. Um You know there are chat rooms and in 2005 my space came out and you could upload songs and I mean you were getting thousands and thousands of plays. This is before, this is before sound clouds and you just spend hours on saying it was just bewildering that you could be on your phone for hours, right? Remember like mess, getting a message from Red Man on my space. Like I just, you know, certain things I remember remember, you know, having to get off my space because it took over like my entire life, you know I mean, and I was like getting sober off like probation, going to like 12 step meetings and like just messaging people on Myspace like all day and like delivering pizza And trying to figure out how to go back to college, like as a felon, you know, I mean again, um and my space was the platform from 2005 To like 2010 and then out of nowhere it came twitter and twitter became a thing...

...where I started Traveling into the world of tech and that's when I met Gary Boehner shock in like 2010, you know, so it was just a little bit of a change from there and facebook and you know, then he graduated to instagram. So what, yeah, what would you say? Like was you're like breakthrough? I know you had your, you had done a bunch of things for like big companies, you, you've been in the NBA 2K video game, like tell me like, what was your breakthrough? Yeah, So I mean, the first breakthrough I really had was when I decided that I was going to go full time and book a tour um and I booked the show, I was studying at the yeshiva because they had like, um I don't know, it was just like I was able to move out of my house and moved into this place and I was like, okay, I'll live here and I will, I will book a tour with my boy who they were really looking up to me at the time, he's jewish kids and they helped me um and I booked a show in like sacramento and and like Pittsburgh and I'm like, I'm going to fill it in and then someone from my space actually booked me out like a synagogue and I was starting getting like these gigs, it's like the jewish rapper and I was like, yo I mean, you know, they were able like, you know, non venues, like, you know, events or organizers are people that are from non profits could pay thousands of dollars for someone to come versus like the other place you have to sell the tickets or the money is not there. So I was, you know, that was the first tour and in 2009 I won the Hot 97 rap battle and I got like a promo record deal but like that really kind of put me out and then they got me on tour with modest yahoo and then things started falling into place. Southwest Southwest was huge because I had wrapped for Gary Vaynerchuk there, I had wrapped for I've met every rapper they're basically um in the scene and like you know, I mean I'm talking from the cool kids to meeting paul Rosenberg, you know just getting the meeting, getting the picture, getting you know, starting to document the process. I mean I was documenting things since Iphone four since Blackberries, I mean you know I mean, so If you think about it all these videos of like 100 views and 500 views and 300 views and it just cement you as somebody, this is what you do, you know? Um And along the way like the biggest financial jump for me it was a super bowl commercial in 2012 or bud light I had like $150 in my bank account. Um I recorded the song at like a rest stock in Colorado with like a $12 back, you have to pay like $12 going to the bathroom. I had a really shitty Mike. My old roommate, Lonnie um he was like you bishop by recording system so I brought her a system so I could record on the road. This was like unheard of like you're just packing up your recording equipment in 2012 like and just recording on the road and that changed my life. I mean it was like 100 million people watching the game. The it was played in like playoffs,...

...everything was you know nine years ago and I made enough money from that to like really like get my own place just like just level up to a point where I was like yeah I had more money, I made more money than my dad, you know, I'm saying that year and I was like, whoa, it's crazy and yes, what I would think back to all that is like the big break is that like when you do have a big break is really important to have the proper things in place to really leverage that, you know, and you know in some cases I did in some cases I didn't but you know, I'm still here still doing it, you know? Yeah, for sure then how did how did the two K thing come about? You're in the game, you know? It's crazy. So like they worked with Duck Down Records which is like you know underground rap label with like you know, buckshot and smith and Wesson and and just sort of let sean price recipes like this, this is legendary characters of new york And I say characters, hip hop artists, you know from the 90s, you know um that are still just legendary figures and they, the guy they had, they were like curating a song. So I entered a contest to get my song in it. I took like second or third place. I remember recording this song was about like you know, basketball or something like that. Um I hope to find this song actually, now that I think about it. Um and I was in South by southwest at the venue called the scoot in screwed in is sort of like off the beaten track uh path and I had tons of posters for shows I was playing but it still had my name on the poster. So I said, listen, the show already happened, but I got him. So why don't I just put them up everywhere? So people could say like, oh, I missed that show. Who is that guy? Could, I wish, you know, I could check them out. And while I was passing out flyers and posters for a show that already happened on a picnic table, some guy goes, oh, word, like, are you one of these guys again, kosher Dills? It's like, it's crazy. I work at two K. We should link up and um we should get you like, you lost the thing, we should get you in the game. So, I was passing out like old material for something that had no relevance because it was like, in the past, it would be like, you know I mean? And it's just but it's different, like, you don't, you share an old podcast, you don't share an old flyer that already happened unless it's like a throwback, you know, whatever. And doing that got me the conversation and then he's like, right, send the pictures, you got to send, you know, have somebody take seven pictures. And then it got me into the game where I was like, you know this balding rapper, you know what I'm saying? Like I was like, yeah, they made me extra ball. And you know, that was at the time where I was like, and I was still like dealing with my hair loss, you know what I'm saying now? You know, I'm growing up, I loved being, I love my head. But um, yeah, it was epic. And I made myself the same height, same everything I saw millions of games sold millions and people know me from that all over the world. Yeah, that's awesome. And then you're going back to the Super Bowl commercial, are you are you a Giants fan?...

Um I'm not a Giants fan actually Eagles fan. All right. Because I was gonna say that must have been crazy if you were a Giants fan. They won the Super Bowl that year. You were on like, Yeah, but you know, like I'm not really a good fan. You know what I'm saying? Like I picked the eagles because I was in high school was at its needles and I knew, you know, everyone like the Giants. I was like, I like to, you know, I don't know. I just picked the nerves. No. Right. Exactly. You know why I picked up? Yeah, I feel you all right now coming coming up to present day now you've been killing it for the past few months since I've known you pretty much since we met on clubhouse, but just yeah, um like you like you opened up my mind to do things like that. Like, I I never thought about like rappers like branding themselves with other brands like bud bud light and all that stuff like that, like, and then I was just like, and then when I looked you up and I did and I was like, all right, you got a shit ton of these on here. So I was like, all right, that's lit. And then that's how I asked you to do my song. So yeah, I mean, you know, we got to think outside the box, you know, I'm saying like there's no shows, how often do you do shows and you know, people just love hip hop and how can we make it all, you know, connect Yeah, for sure. And then yeah, just tell me about, I know you went viral like a few times. Uh, this past december january whenever it was, tell me about that like, and you got on the news and things like that. Yeah. So um, as you see, I got this, this uh, this Derby, right boom. So when it was snowing, I, I went in the blizzard and I wrapped on Hanukkah, you know, because I'm saying like uh there's a popular jewish holiday that like everybody like will share something for it even if they're not jewish or anything, you know, just like new york and new york is like in there and I got picked up by some place called Green Pointers and then this website, what is new york posted me um, who also does subway creatures I think too. So it's like kind of like a conglomerate of like mean pages and micro influenced areas and I went viral from that. And then I like did something like rapping about Chinese food on Christmas shoes and Chinese food, just like fun things. I would like fit the kosher dills brand and that got like two, almost 200,000 use on Twitter. And then you know, I did a bagel song and I'm like, okay, now we're like, we're like, what's the, what are we doing with the National Pizza Day? And that's what the bagel that and you know, I had just dropped an album and I'm like, no one's listened to the album, but I'm getting everyone to the album from giving them this and you know, it's what I realized that like there's so much of this, uh, so much of this stuff and, and, and so for Passover, similar to Hanukkah, I'm like, I, I, this is starting to work, let me do moses and moses has become like its own character who is just, you know, moses all year round and I did a wrap of the power and got like half a million, we probably got up to like, you know, around a million to all the pages and I never went viral until this, this december like that, you know, I never had my own thing, I mean, I've...

...gone up have been on collapsed but not my own stuff and it's common, you know, to get 150,000, 50,000 on, on so many different areas. You know, I mean, I have, I have my freestyle rap, I have my music videos, I got my like, just you know, jewish content. So you know, for holidays and I think what I realized is the more I go out there, new york celebrates renegade raw like that specifically to new york's definitely to the east coast and it's something I didn't experience in L. A. Um so you know, if that's what they want and that's who I am, that makes it easier for me because I was gonna do it anyway. Yeah, definitely. Then what has there been any new opportunities that came from that? Yeah, like you said, you saw me rapping in the blizzard, I got in the new york post, you know what I mean? And I met people from there. Um I did the bagel rap and I just did collaborations with Tebow, like straight up real brand deals with like major, multi, multi, multimillion dollar corporations um that, you know, and some of the other just the collaborations like from what is new york to new york, new york and echo, these guys have like, you know, they celebrate the raw and you know, um anything I do is like a television interview, Good Morning America revolt tv um I'm expressing my voice being authentic to myself and leveling up to another level. I did not experience, you know what I'm saying, like, and and to me, I think being authentic is the most important part because ultimately people could say things about you and if you're an actor that is speaking somebody else's lines that were written for you, then you have a problem, but like in the world of music, especially when people are writing things, like people can say whatever they want about the Mosul's character, they could, but like it's something I created and I made it and it's gone viral and it's only been around for two months and I just did the next game and you know, I mean, everything I'm doing is always getting tens of thousands of views has it. So, you know, I'm going to take it all the way to like rolling loud and I wanted to go to, you know, Coachella and I wanted to go to Bonnaroo and I wanted to go to, um, governors Ball and um, like some, because why not? Right? And it's a new, and, and, and there's people that are behind it because they want to see it when you know what I mean? And I think like, as artists and creators, we have to come up with something that gets you excited and makes you want to share it and get behind it without me asking you to get behind it, right? And that's the key. And that's what I've never experienced that till this past couple months. So like from december to May, which has been half a year, it's been my life is like, the amount of followers have got...

...everything is really exciting. Yeah, it's crazy. And then yeah, just tell me about a little bit how, like, clubhouse helped you too. And I know you've been doing a lot of talks uh like about Judaism and jewish people and stuff like that. Yeah, so like on clubhouse, um there's like holocaust, remember, I mean, not just in clubhouse, but there's holocaust remembrance Day, which is in january, we brought the first ever holocaust survivors on clubhouse. Um one there's just a huge thing, you know, like someone from Saudi Arabia joined somebody from California, Connecticut, Mexico Venezuela. And I mean there's no even platform for holocaust survivors That are like dying off every day, like in 20 years, we're not gonna have Holocaust survivors, you know, maybe there'll be one left that was the baby, you know, and you have to think about that this is like a last living testament. And if I could be influential in doing this instead of going to like how to invest in dutch coin, which is also a great thing to do, it's also a great community, like there's a there's a community for this and thousands and thousands of people came on to see this on the first time we had, you know, Lupe fiasco came in, we had, you know, like and these are people that have been people that have been accused of of of of like being anti Semitic had the opportunity to come in and here, I mean there are people that were from arab states and nations that never got to speak to holocaust survivor people from south America and I think it's super important. We had articles on NBC. I was mentioned in Time magazine, I mean, you know, and that's just from doing stuff without even wanting like press, you know, like we assume that people will write it up and you know, but I didn't ask anyone from Time magazine to mention in the article, but like they talked about what we did and you know, Variety magazine, like all these places knew that what you're doing is legendary. And I think for me, I realized that this past six months since being in new york and like getting the confidence, like my music, I gotta like, like the dating world, any aspect of it when you put yourself out there and don't care what people think or how they're going to respond. Um you're going to make so many big leaps and that has been my experience man, like I cannot imagine it. And some of the stuff you do doesn't always hit right, but if you know there's a need for it, his party time bro. Um and I love the best part about working with holocaust survivors is that you realize that they're just people to they don't always want to talk about being a survivor, you know, so to create that experience for this guy Sammy and for other people like inga and just you know, like to tell their story because you can't go into a museum anymore with 1000 people to listen. In fact, is 1000 people that are gonna come probably...

...won't be from all different backgrounds, we probably all be jewish or it could be like a group outing. So clubhouse is a great, great way to meet people from all over the world, different backgrounds, having the opportunity to share um, you know, and doing things like that, connect people back to the music and people meet me from serious stuff. They meet me from wrapping in blizzard to wrapping his moses to, you know, rapping outside the next games. You know, I mean, that's what I think it's cool about just like your story this because like, obviously you have like the serious stuff too, which is like, just totally different than your rap career, I'd say. So it's like a it's like almost showing like, obviously obviously you're human too, but I'm saying, you know what I'm saying? Just like, I don't know, probably like you said, and then it gains you more fans also at the same time. Yeah. I think like people have to also like when you're in music, right? I was like, are you just gonna make music or you also due to speak on some things too? And like someone I really look up to, you know, I don't agree with everything he says, but like, killer mike is someone who's done music forever. He's done, he's been really successful. And then he started a new group, right? Run the jewels, which became more successful than anything he did. And I was going to his solo show and it was like 100 people there. I mean there wasn't even tons of people there in new york. I remember that and and then seeing him speak on on on things that he just feels passionate about and that all works together, right? Because people now have such easy access to a musician, if the musician doesn't come contact them back there, like people think they're a dick, right? So when you put out content and you're like, I'm against bigotry and then you get 20,000, you know, retweets, you're like, well, you know, like just certain, you know, I could just say stuff that's, that's like important to people and helps them get through their day. It doesn't always have to be a rap, a rap averse to wrap a verse. But what we were taught when we came in was we were taught, we were taught a specific way, but now we have to be ready to adapt at any given moment, right? You have to be able to speak on, you have to be able to show up for other people, be helpful and it has to be authentic too. And I think like that's why, you know, killer mike sounds so good because he's authentic to his own self, things that he cares about and people listen to him and that sort of transfers over to multiple aspects of what he does in his whole career. Like I'm doing the pickles and I have a call today about my own, like doing a pickle collab with Grillo's, um shout out to Grillo's and I did stuff with this baseball team to Portland Pickles and just being kosher dills. Like Pickles is a thing, there's a huge business too. So why can't food and music and bagels all go together and podcasting and you know, interviewing other people and giving them platforms. Having crossed survivors, speaking on being Israeli, american Palestine, all that stuff together plus your other stuff,...

...even those things. And this is, this is like sochi for anyone listening, if you have, if you want to be a pundit on one topic, but you are in like a certain area, but you don't have, you don't have like, like clout in your own field, like things that you're passionate about, you should have clout in your own field and it kind of leverage is each one up and levels everything up because people will take you more seriously because of the work you've accomplished in one field, it will value opinion more when you get a chance to speak on something else and I think they all go hand in hand together, you know what I mean? Yeah, sure. And then what's up next for you? Like, what are your plans for any, any new projects? Um Yeah, yeah, man, I'm just like, um, you know, I just have this new music video out with gangsta boo um which is really awesome, was going to space with dodge coin and, and I am releasing a new summer song uh, with this guy Genya from, from Israel and Russia and he's just like, we just got like a nice summer bob we have um, so I have like a music video for that music video for is and me, um I'm performing everywhere around new york city right now um every day, a different, iconic spot while the city is coming back, I'm just trying to do more, more things like that. My main goal right now with the street performing is to do a sold out show in new york city, that's basically from the streets to the stage and for all the people that were performing on the street, we're going to go sell out a show at a venue like barry ballroom or Gramercy and have 605 100 people there, you know, supporting like the real authentic grind. And I believe personally for me that I've never felt more accomplished than now and you know, people think, oh wow, he's like rapping on the street, like, like, I don't look at it that, like, I look at that, I'm doing everyone else's service by being out there, you know what I'm saying? Like, I'm really here to lift other people up and we're underdogs in this, like, I wasn't supposed to be successful, you know, I wasn't supposed to win that battle, I wasn't supposed to be an NBA two K, but I did extra work along the way to get the crumbs, but now we're gonna start to take the cake And I feel like I'm in my bag with that, and I just like, I don't know if I expressed that, right, but I feel like people are rallying behind me and they want to see it happen, you know what I mean? And that's why we're getting big stuff, you know, that's why we're getting and just started getting the million views now. You know, 2020, I got my first million views. It's almost two million with cascade. So there's a lot of things happening. Um, not like from rap to dance tracks to everything across the board. And people want to know your story, right? So if I get 20 people here are 50 people that really like, like the the story, you know, hopefully they'll rally behind me too. And then, you know, hopefully I got I find people that I can rally behind as well and we all do it together. Yeah, definitely. All right. You ready for some fun questions? Yeah. What do you like? I...

...mean, those are fun. They're fun. Regardless. What do you what do you like to do in your free time? Oh, my free time. I'm a big runner. So like, I like taking runs over the bridge. It's something I've been really um really liking. Um and I currently like I'm just every day I I do something great for my I live in an apartment, but I'm trying to make it a palace. So I'm always buying stuff. So like I'm really getting into plants, you know what I'm saying? So I'm trying to copy copies plants. Get, get some greenery in my place. I'm not the kind of smoke but the kind you like embrace and yeah, dude, I have, I was thinking of ways they went free time. I don't have free time. I make three times. So like cooking plants just, you know, estimable acts that I really like. I like that like bring me joy, you know what I mean? For sure. What about, what's your favorite song right now? That's not yours? Oh um her name is bia Zenobia, a whole lot of money. Whole lot of money as a whole lot of money. And I was on her before she blew up. Yeah actually supposed to get her on the podcast. She's like blowing up now. But she got you've had on the podcast I'm supposed to get her. Yeah. You know she's my home girl. I think Maria used to manage her. I don't know she still does but I just I was like dancing into it the other day at a party and I'm like uh you know the other day I went to a boat party and then I randomly walked into like a cowboy themed party and I was like yo and they were playing and I was like this is a cowboy themed party that I went to. Um and I was like this song is so good and I love I love being a song to shit man. Like I played 100 times, 100 times you know. Yeah. What was cool? Um I don't know if you saw her other songs skate the NHL just did a collab with her for the playoffs and she remix, she's been attitude long time coming, you know a long time coming. So she's a shout out to be a Yeah but I love her. Oh my God dude. Well I will be we're definitely we're definitely clipping this one. Yeah I do yeah shout out to be a all right, well this might go with the last question. Who who would be like your dream collapsed? Um Well yeah right that's what I say about beer. That would be I would love to collaborate with just a lot of dope women. I really like collaborating with women. Um I you know I think you know anyone from you know be a two kid cutty too. Um you know like if it was underground rap I would love to you know collab with killer mike or atmosphere is like I love them. Um but you know I'm doing a collapse of the students seeing black who's really does because the black Orthodox jewish rapper in Jerusalem. Um And uh he's just he's just just in his new video shoe and this dude just I've known him for years like since 2000 and so I get excited to collaborate with people like that. But then like you...

...know when you see your friends homeboy Sandman, people like that my boy flex Matthews just my friends that I've been doing music side by side with for so long, that's great. But you know in the end of the day like how bia had her own hit song that's like exactly what I want. So I just got to keep making the songs and you know what it's no one else's fault that I don't have a hit song, it's only my fault, you know what I mean? And I'm okay with that so I gotta keep writing them and I think I got one, you know what I'm saying? I think I got one and I always think I got one but you know not everyone else thinks you know for sure. I mean even I mean I'm sure you've seen a lot of times where people's songs blow up years later. Yeah dude like that song I had in a super bowl commercial was four years old at the time, I made it in 2008 you know? Um and that was that was just the reality of it, you know I made in 2008, Bang gets out in 2012 and I still send that song out and we still, you know, if we could sink these old songs, you know, and then that's the great thing about music, people could use them forever. Well, I appreciate you coming on and I could, you have the listeners know where you can follow you at? Yeah man, um kosher Dills, K O S H A D I L L Z. Um My websites, kosher Dills world dot com, you can follow it on Spotify, kosher Dills, twitter, instagram. Tiktok is kosher Dills 8 to 6. Um and um if you're interested in getting merged, you just go to the kosher Dills. That's always great. And you know, it gives a kosher Dills merch store on the website. But um Youtube, it's just, it's like clockwork, kosher dills everywhere on the internet, you know? But that used to be one of my tag lines and they don't like anymore because people think I'm too is easily accessible, but I'm in new york so you know, say what's up? Yeah. Again I appreciate it. Yeah, average is average, nothing less. Okay.

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