Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 1 year ago

Matthew Gaeta | Average To Savage EP117

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and seventeenth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring MLB agent Matthew Gaeta. Paul Guarino talked with Matthew Gaeta discussing how he became a baseball agent, awesome stories about his clients, and his first client making it to the MLB.

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This podcast interview with Matthew Gaeta was originally recorded on January 21, 2021

...this'll is the average to savage podcast with Paul Guerrino. Everyone in anyone athletes, celebs and much more so up, everybody. I'm back for another episode. The average savage podcast or special guest today is Matt Gaeta. Matt, how's it going? It's going well. Paul. Thanks for having me on, man. Two years in the making, Like you've been saying it has been. You've been you've been, want me on the show for a while, and it is my first separate podcast. So I had to come on. Yeah, definitely. I mean, that's what I like to dio. I'd like to have exclusive interviews. Uh, eso Why not with you? Um I know we know each other for I don't even know how long now. Maybe, like, four or five years. Um, I can't. I was just thinking about it. I don't remember exactly how connected I want to say it was. It was linked in originally, I think it was instagram. It was when I first opened the agency in 2016 and chasing Mata, one of my first clients, he came across some of your T shirts, wanted me to reach out, and that's sort of how we linked up. Oh, for sure. Yeah, that was That was dope. Yeah. Chase, Uh, r i p to chase. That was, uh, appreciate him. Yeah, that's how. Actually, now, now I recall that's how we got connected. He was always rocking it. I always appreciated him for that. Yeah, yeah, let's just I mean, while we're on the topic like, how did you How did you get his first meet? Like, how did you first meet him? So me and chase. So when I first opened the agency in 2016, it was March or April. I had maybe three clients at the time and came across, um, film of him on minor league baseball dot com and went on instagram and followed them and looked at his entire profile page on Instagram saw how family oriented he was, how passionate he was about baseball, how you know, Chase living life freely, doing it his way, and all his vibes really connected with my core values with the agency. And I messaged him and he messaged me back. We set up phone call, and I mean, from there, we just hit it off. And our first time meeting up was 2016 high a All Star game at the Florida State League and literally within maybe five minutes of meeting him. It kind of felt like you knew him your whole life. You just knew how to make people feel welcome and comfortable. And I mean, from there it's it's pretty much history. We we were used my first guy that I went through free agency with, uh got a resigned by the Phillies to go to big league camp and the Yankees and Tigers. So we went three for three. And I mean, I literally Oh, chase a lot, uh, building and building GSM and being the agent that I am today without him, undoubtedly, I'm not here. I'm not doing what I'm doing. He was easily one of the first credible clients that I had that trusted me. Eso early with his career, especially going through the rigors of even just minor league free agency and solidifying a contract, that's definitely not easy. And he placed his trust in me, and we built definitely brotherhood type relationship. So Chase is definitely paramount in me being who I am today. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. Like I felt like I knew him to be honest, like even just like his post and all that stuff. It was just always, always a good, good vibes. Um, now, just going back, back in time. Now, obviously, I knew you were You were a baseball player growing up, you played baseball at N Y u Like when? When When was Usually I ask people, When was the moment they knew they could go pro. But for you, I want to know when was the moment you didn't gonna go pro. But you knew you wanted to work in sports, though, so I always thought growing up that I was gonna be a major league baseball player. Like every child growing up who plays a sport and is dedicated to it. Um, my...

...dad was the one who instilled the love of baseball in me. I was actually a big hockey player growing up, my mom would wake up before I am and drive me to the rank and all that sort of stuff. So she she still brought me the batting cages and whatnot when I was growing up. But ultimately, she wasn't too sad to see me hang up the skates because no more four AM calls to the rank. But baseball, Um, always knew that I truthfully wanna work in baseball. Um, once I sort of around high school early on in college. That's when I started to grasp the business side scouting side of what it really takes to become a professional baseball player at the affiliated ranks and knew that I was good. But I wasn't that good, Um, in terms of what I wanted, the ah ha moment of becoming an agent. Um, probably I got older nerve transposition surgery, which pretty much means I blew out the nerve in my throwing elbow on had surgery my freshman year of college, and to this day, it's still kind of not fully healed. But during that time, I really immersed myself in the business side of baseball in learning about the collective bargaining agreement, the joint drug prevention treatment program, everything that really an agent and then l B p. A certify agent would need tohave a za knowledge base. And just between my love for baseball. Ah, lot of my professors at N. Y. U who I developed incredible relationships with Charlie Grantham, who was one of the first heads of the N B. A union. He was extremely paramount in me, becoming an agent with his guidance and tutelage of how he went through the sports industry, and Professor Cameron Miler, who was a former Olympian who was by professor at N Y U as well. Um, those two definitely instilled in me the practical teachings to be able to open up GSM and and the confidence is as well as my parents. But once I sort of realized sophomore year that baseball wasn't in the cards anymore, I did something completely unconventional. And junior years signed up to take the MLB P a agent certification exam. At 21. I walked in and had a quick silver T shirt on and Jordan sweatpants, and I think it was blue Nike Pegasus running shoes and I walked in and they give you a name tag because before you take the exam, you go through a process of, um, the study period, where they go over like, what's on the exam, what study for and all that stuff. So when I went to go check in and get Magnin tag, one of the people at the front desk goes Oh, if you're waiting for your dad or Mom, you can wait outside thinking that I was a kid and I said, No, I'm actually here to take the exam So that's Ah, that's my fun story of how I kicked off my agency career so quickly change the tires. You could see also repping your shirt e like that that Yeah, that's that's that's hilarious. And I think that's like the biggest myth. I think a lot of people think you have to have your law degree, which is which is false. Yeah, you don't need tohave it, um n y u my major was sports management of concentration sports law. And actually, I'm in the prosthesis right now of I've been in it for the last two years getting my law degree. I go to New York Law School Evening division program so still able to fully operate the agency and the business. But on my...

...own time, getting that law degree just further enhance my credibility in the business and for my client's best interests. But, I mean, that's definitely a misconception is you don't have to have it, but it z helpful to have it. Um Yeah, Like how did you like how, like even at 21. How did you know you were able to take the test like while you were still in school? Um I was gonna e con class and I was really bored, to be quite honest. And I started just drawing my logo. And really, that's when I started Thio. I was paying attention. Kind of not really going on in the e p a website looking at the requirements when I saw you didn't have toe have, um any sort of three age limit qualifications? Um, I just signed up. I filled out my application for a background check and wanted to pass the background check. I got the date to take the exam and I took it. And in the meantime, while waiting for the background check and everything Thio check out in that process to continue, I built a business plan. Uh, did my logo, um, targeted what players? I wanted Thio target in certain leagues and sort of just built my brand and business plan sort of, um, during my junior year of N y u. So that would have been winter fall winter of 2015 going, It's 2016. And that's sort of how everything in fruition Yeah, way ahead of the curb, for sure. What about? Like how? Like, how did you approach like the very first client you got? I don't even know who was the very first. So this is a great story, actually. So the first client that I ever signed his name was Bret Dough with the Minnesota Twins. And he ultimately led me to Nick Anderson. Who, Uh, this was my first bigly client. But Brett was a catcher at Lo Wei with the Cedar Rapids kernels in the Minnesota Twins organization and had a little bit of time at high a Fort Myers miracle and follow them on Instagram and gm them and said, Hey, I just open up my own agency. I wanted to see if you're available to talk. This is what I believe in. This is how I go about my business. This is how I assess players and how you know my philosophy. My guidance can better help enhance your career. And he was all about it, and we scheduled the call. And within a day, I had my first client three weeks later, he actually ended up getting released. Just cause roster crunch, and we still stayed in very, very close connection. He ended up being the bullpen catcher Triple A that season went into coaching on a year later in 2017. He hit me back up and he said, You're probably gonna want to take a look at this guy. His name is Nick Anderson and I played with him at Low a. Um, he's a dude. He's got stuff and, you know, falling on Instagram or the others. If I'm on Instagram or here's his number And he gave it to me and I reached out to Nick and the United States in contact for eight months and never had an agent before. And we just developed a relationship of just talking. And then ultimately, um, he texted me right after spring training, 2017, and he said, Hey, uh, are you still interested? I said 1000% and book the flight literally the next day, and at that time I had never flown to see a client. I've only done on phone calls. Um, still young in the process didn't have any big name guys. So when certain...

...guys who were a single, a double A were like fly out to see me. Never really got the vibe that this player is going to be worth it. But Nick and I had stayed in contact for eight months and developed styled relationship to the point where, from character standpoint, person standpoint, I would do anything for him. And I also felt my heart of hearts that he was going to be a force in the majors. So dropped, I think, 850 bucks on one way ticket, because I literally got it five hours. It was the best $850 I've ever spent on a one way ticket to Tampa, Florida, because he was playing the Tampa Yankees at High A. Met up with him at a Holiday Inn, where we had pizza at Thesis Ports for that was attached to it. He walks out of the turnstile doors. I just remember looking up thinking this dude is going to step on May and he was a gentle giant, super nice. We hit it off and the rest is history. But yeah, my first client, Brett Dough, ended up linking me up with Nick this why I needed to have you on. Let the people know that it was like that. It's not. I mean, obviously, it's how everything's hard, but like they need to see that that it is possible for people to just you just did a one 1000%. I mean, it's not. And did anybody who starts something new, even like yourself? I'm sure there are moments of doubt sec creep in that. Is this work that can I do it? And I mean, you know, God willing, God bless, I've I've done well with the agency in the five years that it's been going knock on wood. Same with same with the PG brand and you blown up a swell. But it's those early initial years where nobody knows your name. You don't have any big name clients. You're grinding. You're not sleeping. I remember staying up until three or four AM just to target certain players. See who's available analytically from sabermetric standpoint, who, you know, possesses the best abilities to continue to make it up the ladder, Um, researching the guys, getting to know them as people versus just numbers, and, you know, you just have to keep saying to yourself, You put in the work, you have the knowledge, you have the people around you supporting you and the big break will eventually come. And for me it happened for 3.5 years into the agency with Nick and then Randy Domack with twins Rica Garcia on a handful of other guys who are on their way. But for the 1st 2.5 3.5 years, it's it's grinding, and it's just not accepting the fact that, okay, I'm working my butt off and you know, some things might not be going my way right now, but I'm in it for the long haul. It's a marathon. It's not a sprint. You got to stick to your vision. Stick to what you believe in old, true to your why your purpose, why you're doing what you're doing. And ultimately, you know, Even if you don't reach the goal that you have set out for yourself along the way and a long journey, you're gonna be able to at least prove to yourself that I stuck with it and I accomplished a lot along the way, and that's something that nobody could ever take away from you. Yeah, Yeah, for sure. What about like since you were so young? Was there any, like, backlash from, like, some players that maybe you didn't sign or anything? And they're like like, you don't have experience. You're, like 22 something like that. I mean, I had players initially who said that, and I always knew that doesn't matter how old you are. I don't care if you're 20 or if you're 50 or 60. If you're getting into the industry. If you have the connections, if you're personable, if you have the suave too, um, you know, be credible in your analytical research in portraying your client in the best...

...light. Um, age doesn't matter if you were 50 or 60 and you're out of touch with sabermetrics and don't know the statistics of what fip or X fit or Sierra is versus e. R. A and Whip, which used to be the old metrics that, uh, teams used to assess player evaluation for pictures specifically. Then that's just something where Okay, if you went with somebody who might be an older, incredible agency, they might not know certain things that air in trends with baseball. Currently, that's where I saw sort of. My asset was I just went through all these showcases of perfect game area codes. Use a baseball and all these baseball outlets that these guys just went through and having played and having family in sports. One of my my biggest advocate, er's and somebody I looked up to growing up his Bobby marks. He's my cousin. He was the assistant GM for the Brooklyn Nets. Onda worked with them for 20 years. He's now on ESPN MBA. But hey, was someone who started as a paper boy intern, uh, driving John Calipari from the stadium to pick him up at the airport and get his dry cleaning and coffee and grind it to the top. And with with all of that and having looked up to Bobby and seeing how he operated on a daily basis, Um, all those sort of teachings allowed me to, you know, tell future clients. Hey, I'm I'm young. I'm knowledgeable. I've had family who have worked in sports and have excelled, but ultimately, and more importantly, what I offer players is transparency in a line of communication where on the sole agent there's no other agent on staff. Um, I grew this from nothing into what it is now. And take pride in that and completely open to talking to players, families, wives, girlfriends, cousins. Um, so a selling point to the track from the age miss number of you have to be older to be a successful agent. That's completely false, because my age of 25 right now, I've I've already had a client in the world Siri's and have had amazing stories of success stories of guys signing minor league free agent deals and and big leaguers and getting them endorsement deals and whatnot. So it's really just sticking to your vision and and having the lines of connections toe quit your clients in the best place and being able to be personable and genuine. That's the most important thing People consonant b s from a mile away. If you're not genuine, you're not gonna get anywhere. So that's that's pretty much that. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. I could totally agree with you on same way. Same way. Um, also What was it like? I know you mentioned Nick. What was it like when he made the major leagues in that that that for people that don't know that makes you like in the players association. Also, yes. So to be a full on certified major league baseball agent, you first have Thio file for the application. Take the test passed the background check, passed the written exam, and you have to have a player on the 40 man. So Nick debuted on March 28th of 2019, which happened to be my birthday. Oddly enough, there's the story just just keeps going. It writes itself, Um, two days before I was with Nick because we had a feeling he was either going to make the Opening Day roster or they were going to send him to Triple A because he was on the 40 man at that time just to get reps, wait for somebody get hurt and then get...

...called up. Um, so ultimately, it was March. I want to say 25th. I was down to Jupiter, Florida, and he called me that morning and said, What are you doing? And I said nothing about to grab breakfast. Why? And he said, uh, check out of the hotel. We're driving to Miami, and he made the opening day roster we drove down on. I actually stayed with them at the Marriott that night before I checked into my hotel. But, yeah, that's that was pretty much the story of we didn't know if he was gonna make it or not. And that was the culmination of pretty much Nick getting to the point where he was at where it wasn't even handed to him. He shoved the spring training. If you look at the 2019 numbers at spring training with Miami, I mean, he deserved to be on it. But there's There's a certain aspects of behind the scenes with front office personnel of putting certain players above others for monetary investment reasons. Options. There's a lot that goes into it, but ultimately made. It is like the last guy on the roster, and he debuted on March 28th, my birthday. His his mom, Barb, his dad, Russ, and his sister, Elissa. We were all down there and we were saying ourselves, there's no way he's going to debut on opening day like he just made the majors and he'll probably pitching like Saturday or Sunday and what do you know? Nick Anderson is warming up in the bullpen. I think it was the sixth inning and he came in first pitch 96 right down the middle and the next pitch he got there he was Trevor story to ground out to short. And he made his debut by throwing two pitches. It was on my birthday was pretty cool. We went out, was celebrated after, and Yeah, rest is rest. Is that Yeah. I mean, like, all the guys you have. Like, they have crazy stories. And Nick, I know he was He was working in the off season two because I think as a lot of people know, minor leaguers don't make that much. And, uh and I remember I remember he was remember, he was almost gonna get called up the year before. I got the, uh, September call ups and we were talking about it. Yeah, Minnesota, He, uh, Triple a. I mean, I still I joke with him. I still remember his entire stat line from Triple A 88 break out 60 innings. I could while you, which batter he faced the last game that he threw before September call ups was against the Philadelphia Phillies Triple A organization. He struck out five out of six batters and I mean, everything happens for a reason. Minnesota's of fantastic organization. They gave him his opportunity toe get into affiliated baseball where he is now. And they've treated Dove knack with the utmost respect as well. So, I mean, everything happens for a reason. Minnesota Homegrown. It would be cool if he was in the Twins uniformed, but, um, yeah, everything happens for a reason. You are where you're meant to be. So that was Yeah, 2018. And then I got traded that offseason to Miami and then 2019 was when he made his debut. Yeah. I mean, now he's one of the best relievers in the game. Hey, got all MLB this year, right? Yeah. First team, all MLB. It's It's awesome. I mean, honestly, Nick deserves it. He's been through so much, and I mean, I consider him a brother. He's stuck with me. He was one of my first clients. Do is, I think, eight months into the agency's when we started talking and he signed on with me and and stuck with me and, you know, did right by each other and hoping Thio make it a nice 10 year career on his part. But I mean, another awesome story of perseverance have not given up of working in the offseason. Odd jobs. Waking up at five in the morning to get just lift in, going toe work, home remodeling and then doing is throwing at nine at night. And that's what the GSM agencies built off of a bunch of grinders. Dove knack with uber...

...driving and doing odd jobs. Ricoh worked at a Italian restaurant is a bus boy Matt Peacock, who just got put on the 40 man actually quit baseball toe work at his dad's sawmill company in college and just picked up a baseball again, decided to go at it senior year and got drafted and rode the Waves where he is now. Addison Russ. Whose was that? The 60 man all set with the Yankees? He's a substitute teacher in the off season, he was easily the best double a relief prospects. So, I mean, these guys have amazing stories, and it's inspiring. And even the kid Mike Adams, a man I should say he's 26 who just time with the Phillies, who is a pitching instructor and teaches a lot of my kids, uh, at his training facility. And he hasn't pitched in unorganized game and probably out of four years is he graduated college, 2016, played in the wall then and built his own company for pitching performance center, baseball performance centers. What it's called, then he has. He's quote unquote says, I accidentally told myself Throw 98 he went from being a pitching coach to two days ago when we were initially scheduled to do the podcast and I had to cancel because he was signing then, uh, a member of the Philadelphia Phillies organization and another guy who has a movie asked story. But again, all these guys have absolutely inspiring stories, and that's why I got into the agency industries to give. Give these guys a voice, give them, give them something to fight for. And, um, yeah, I give my 100%. They give the 100% and, um, it's It's more than just baseball. It's about giving people a chance and hope of Well, if they could do it, I could do it. That's how you started. You know, your your brand. That's how I started. My agency is we didn't get guys who were big name clients right off the bat. We had to grind to get where we were. And that's what's all about. Yeah, yeah, for sure. And what about Oh, yeah. And actually, I think I might have seen Mike in college because, uh, e definitely saw Ben Ben in college. Uh um, so yeah, but what about So since now, like, you have a few major leaguers, um, like, has Has people been reaching out now to you? Like more? So So, yeah. So another interesting story was So once, Randy, this is getting a little off topic, but, um, my name's sort of started getting known last year once Nick and Randy made the playoffs. And Randy, actually, when he got named game to starter of the LDS Yankee Stadium for context for fans viewing, Randy started 2019 season at High A Fort Myers worked his way up to the majors that season, which rarely, if not ever happens. And then on top of that, he pitches Game two of the LDS and Yankee Stadium. Um, which is absolutely incredible. So once his story sort of went viral. I guess people went thio his baseball reference or his Twitter and Instagram and saw, Oh, get a sports management. That's his agency. Well, when I first opened the agency, I put my cell phone number on there because I wanted people get in contact with me thinking nobody's really gonna look at the website. Well, Randi's story went viral, and I started just getting a damn phone calls. So you're the uber drivers agent. I get a randy signed ball, so I actually had changed my number because I was just getting hit up by a bunch of random people. Um, so the in short, yes, once, uh, I got majorly clients. I definitely became known, but in terms of clientele, in word of mouth, Yeah, it's helped. Um, it just shows that I retain clientele loyalty. My guys that once they reach...

...big, they don't venture off. They know that I do a great job for them. I treat them as his family and his humans before players and do what's in their best interest. Not in mine. Um, I've fiduciary duty to uphold my client's best interests, and that's what I do. 24 7. They're my brothers, their their family. And ultimately, um, I do my absolute best to put them in the best position, do right by them, and the results speak for themselves, and they see that it's genuine and, um, in combination with all those and having the Nixon Randy's. I've definitely had influx of higher up players reach out to me in wanting to represent them, and I mean, last off season, I probably had 100 guys reach out to me versus probably the three years before that in the off season. I probably had maybe like 40 in those 3 to 4 years reach out to me. So definitely once you get big name guys, but the key is keeping them and go in that, you know, they're still part of your family. I don't, uh, take on a guy unless I truly believe that, um, they're great people off the field but have also have the abilities to perform on the field. And, um, once they're playing well, it's not like I go to the next young guy to make sure he gets moved up. I still give everybody the same attention. I go and visit my guys whether it's going to visit Randy and throwing with him on the high school field in West Virginia or going to golf with Nick or flying out Thio, Arizona, and hanging out with all my clients out there. So once once they get me, they know that they have me and I pretty much talk to them every day. So it's pretty cool. Family agency of we do business, but it's also more than that, So, yeah, definitely. I mean, I think that's what your social media shows. And I think e think that's why everyone is attracted to, you know, Um and what about I read in the N. Y. U article? Congrats on all the awards this year. Thank you. And, uh, I saw you had over 75 clients now. So how do you How do you manage that? Um, I live for it. I wake up at, like, five or 6 a.m. And I mean, I I am able to balance it just because it's what I live for. 24 7. I'm glued to my phone. Everybody that knows me jokes and say he's always on his phone. He's always on this phone. It's It's just my job. I'm always there texting the guys, calling the guys. Um, some guys say, Hey, you, I know you have my best interests at heart. You do your job like that's why I hired you. But I don't need to be talked to every day. Like just hit me up every other two weeks and you know will be good. Just keep me informed with what the organization expects of me and getting equipment and just staying in contact with my family members that want to know. But ultimately, I don't need to be talked to every day. Some guys need to talk to me every day, and I'm accessible. But ultimately I mean, I I live for this. This is my job. This is what I signed up for and this is it's my craft. I'm dedicated to it. But you have to have passion if you're not passionate about it and it starts to become monotonous, that's when you know you've reached a point where maybe you should do something else. But I plan on doing this for the next 40 years. Plus, and I love it. It's it's these stories. These guys journeys that gets me going, and it's something where they majority of my guys, Even though I've some who are international sign ease or high draft picks, a majority of them have a story that's amazing and inspiring and um, something that I love to be a part...

...of and and want to go to bat for. And it's analogous to how I came up is an agent and how I was brought up by my family of not expecting anything to be handed to me of going out and earning it. And I was instilled by my dad, who was very, very, um, paramount and who I became as a man and professional. I would go to his office on Sundays from middle school all the way even until college, when I was rehabbing and we would go in on Saturdays and Sundays to his office, and I saw how he operated his small firm. He's an engineer and seeing him just absolutely grind day in and day out and doing what he did for his customers and his employees on it, it's still the driving me to where I knew if I wanted to be successful, I had to put in the work and there was no guarantees of success. But I'd rather live with the fact that I gave my own. Maybe if it didn't work out so well. But there's just no regrets and just putting your all out there. So I definitely give a lot of credit to my dad as well as my mom because she was extremely supportive and the agency venture and, um, she always was there to support made during my highs and my lows. And without those two, I wouldn't even be talking to you. To be honest, it definitely what about hate to bring it about? Like, what was the past 2020 season like with co vid and then also with the draft? Only being was the six rounds. Yeah, it was. It was five rounds. And then there was a period on Sunday afternoon that free agents would be able to sign for a Max deal of 20 K. it was a shock. I was actually. When the season got canceled, I was playing call of duty with Hobie Harris, who's another GSM incredible story. Watch for him. He'll definitely have a great chance to debut this year with the Toronto Blue Jays and a PT Sports rapper. Um, but yeah, we were playing. He was playing call of duty. Actually, let me rephrase that, because I stink of video games. He was playing it. I was on my laptop and it was spring training, and we got the update that the Jazz I forgot to do. The player was tested positive co vid and then little over. Yeah, a little over 30 minutes later, Silver bang the MBA season indefinitely or postponed it. And Major League Baseball didn't come out with an announcement at that time. So at that time, I people text me saying, Is MLB gonna be on? Is this season gonna be canceled? And I actually played the next day and I drove down to Tampa because Addison Russ, another PG sports guy, uh, who's with the Yankees that I wrapped? He was with the Phillies at the time in big league camp and pitched against the Rays next team, And it was that day that they canceled all the games and the postponed season indefinitely. So Addison's game against Tampa was the last organized major league baseball game before the season started back up in July and right after the last pitch, they came on the announcements that Port Charlotte, where the Rays spring training facility is and said due to the Cove in 19 Pandemic, the major League baseball season's been postponed indefinitely. For any questions, visit MLB dot com. It felt like you were in a movie because everybody was. It felt like people were moving more slowly. Nobody knew the severity or the magnitude of the virus, how long things were gonna be. And then in the ensuing days as it got more intense, um, in serious that it was apparent that Major League...

Baseball But I'm a minor league baseball might not even have a season. And unfortunately, minor league baseball didn't. But it was tough. I had three guys who pitched in the majors this year, and Nick and Randy and Enrico Garcia with the Giants, but for a lot of the minor league guys that I have, they just grinded at their houses. They were doing makeshift bullpens by thrown balls against a brick wall, Um, taking dry hacks in their garages with Wiffle balls. Credit to the minor league baseball players. They don't get the spotlight but nobody in terms of professional baseball has had it hit harder than the minor leaguers because their development got halted. There was only 60 man rosters able to be, um, formulated during the season. So that left 100 150 plus minor leaguers for each organization having to develop on their own certain states with certain state laws. With quarantine, not being able to maybe go to a park, go to a gym versus being in a state that has all that, um, guys had Thio adjust and adapt on the fly and credits all my guys because they busted it. And some of them, uh, made it significant strides during this one of them who has just within Florida. Johnny Schneider with the Cincinnati Reds, worked his butt off during quarantine to increases. Vallo, um, got invited, Thio instructs, which was a thing for minor leaguers this fall to give them some live game reps. And Johnny went from 93 to 95 96 touching seven and really worked on his craft. Um, that's just one of a handful of stories of guys that, um, we're just being constant contact with me of doing their thing and working on their game and knowing, Hey, there might not be a season. But at some point, baseball is gonna come back, and whatever it looks like, I'm gonna be ready. So shout out to them. Yeah, for sure. Yeah, I've been seeing some of them posts on social media grinding. Uh, and then what about like this season? Like any. I don't think there's been in your ruling yet, but you think there's gonna be like a minor league season. There will definitely be a minor league season. And I feel just because I don't personally see minor league baseball being able economically to, uh, with stand back to back years of not having a season, Um, and also from a player development standpoint, minor leaguers. The major leaguers that you see now ultimately played minor league baseball s. So it is a pipeline you have to start somewhere. So in terms of player development and getting the guys the necessary reps in order to perform at the major league level, it's needed now whether it's a full season, it's already even said that, um, double A and lower affiliates are not gonna be starting spring training on time. Um, that's a given that the season won't have its normal 100 plus games. But ultimately, I still feel confident that there will be a minor league season. Just given all those factors. Yeah, definitely. Ready for some fun questions from average savage. Shoot it. What's your What's your favorite song right now? Yeah, proof I Wow, I'm gonna throw a curveball here. It's my favorite song of all time. Uh, here I go again by Whitesnake said 80 song. All right, what's your favorite social media platform? Ah huh. Instagram. All right. Um what about what do you What do you like to do in your free time work of the agency? I mean, I just I love one guy sent me film. As you see...

...on my social media platforms, I'm always posting on my story, their workouts. So their bullpens or they're they're hitting off a tee or live babies. So I just like to work more. I feel you on that, because people ask me that sometimes, too. And I'm just like like, I just like to like, I can't not do stuff like I feel like weird if I'm not doing anything. Yeah, exactly. um, last one. What? What what advice would you give to Ah, a younger person wanted to be a sports agent. Yeah. Um mhm. So the question always be open thio constructive criticism and learning from other people. Even if they're your age, if they're even younger than you or older, Um never, never take for granted the advice that your peers could give to you because the more info, the better knowledge is powerful. And don't be closed minded to think that you know everything because nobody knows everything. Um, growing up as a high school athlete, I thought I knew everything in terms of baseball and mechanics and everything and even in college with my coaches and ultimately, um, more knowledge. You have to be, um, at your disposal, the better off you'll be. So definitely be open toe learning even new techniques and being able Thio adapt on the fly Things don't go is plan So being able Thio, adapt and continue Thio be open toe learning. Yeah, definitely. Well, that was amazing. I appreciate you coming on and I could do with listeners know where they could follow you at at Gaeta Sports Mgt on Twitter and Instagram.

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