Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Quincy Amarikwa | Average To Savage EP61

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the sixty-first episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring pro soccer player of DC United, Quincy Amarikwa. Paul Guarino talked with Quincy Amarikwa discussing his unexpected journey to the MLS, experiences playing in the MLS, and his passion for entrepreneurship. Follow Quincy Amarikwa https://www.instagram.com/QuincyAmarikwa

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Greno, everyone in anyone, athletes, so ebs and much more. It's up, everybody and back for another episode of the average savage podcast. Or special guests today is Quincy Amer Quab DC united. Hey Quincy, what's going on? Appreciate you coming on the podcast given thanks for having me. I'm excited to, you know, share a little bit of my soccer journey with everybody. Yeah, yeah, definitely. Let's just jump right into how did you get into playing soccer? Oh Man, so my father is Nigerian. He was born and raised in a wary Nigeria and over there will pretty much everywhere else other than America, soccer or football is the number one sport in the world and when my dad came over here and had me, obviously that was the first sport I was introduced to and the one that the two of US funded most closely over by going to play at the local Nigerian league every Saturday from maybe it was like three years old, and so go back there today, but that's kind of how I got introduced to the game and fell in love with it. Yeah, you got you're not going through high school I'm sure you had like plenty of do on offers. So what was your recruiting process like? Oh that's that one's interesting. So I actually didn't have a lot of recruitment offers, and a big reason why I'm sure we'll probably talk about a little bit more later, but I started perfect soccer Skillscom was because my high school process, my recruiting process, was one that I think it's typical of most players, but is the reason why both players don't end up playing division one or college soccer or eventually going pro, and the reason for that is I just wasn't getting recruited. I didn't know college coaches had ever reached out to me and you know, I was scoring goals and games and playing and doing what I thought would be necessary to play college soccer and I wasn't getting any recruitment or any interest. So I just assumed that I must not be good enough to play and my plan was just to go to school, to Uc Berkeley, where I got in academically and walk onto the track and field team because I was a poll volture in high school and I had the pole voulting record at my local high school. I did research and saw that the heights that guys were jumping, we're hitting and at Berkeley were within my range, so I figured I'd walk on there. It wasn't until the last game of the last tournament of my club soccer career that to college coaches happened to attend the game to watch the opposing teams players recruiting a year out. So I was a sixteen year old senior. So I was the young senior and both coaches had asked about me after that game and we're asking where I was going to school. I who was recruiting me, and they both learned that night that no one had recruited me and that I was a senior and that I wasn't planning on playing college soccer. So it was in that night that I got seen, recruited and offered a scholarship. So very lucky in the sense that it took so long before I was seen, but once I got to college and I played my four years that I ended up picking. You see, Davis. I've said there for years, at division on collegiately. It as well as there that I learned all the things that I should have been doing in high school that would have gotten me multiple scholarship offers and multiple interest from school. So it was through luck that I ended up getting retreated, but while I was in college I learned all the things that I should have been doing to increase my chances of getting retreated. Yeah, you got it. Did you say it was a high school game that they found? You'RE A club game. No, Club. So Guy. I remember correctly, it was like a nomad's tournament down in and Diego. Yeah, yeah, no man's or like a something. I can't remember what they were, but we were like a silvery leat team and we happen to make it Fart enough in the tournament that we played like a Premier League team at like nine o'clock at night on a Sunday with like only two yeah, there's only two games. Is like the last games of it is basically like we were a team that played together for a long time and we had a lot of chemistry because we knew each other, but we weren't a team of you know, none on my club Team Played Division One soccer on scholarship and then the one I've played with...

...in college went pro, because I've always been with the misfits, which is in me, very well, yeah, yeah, that's crazy. That's crazy. And was this before? Like did you have like a highlight tape or no, like on Youtube? Oh No, in high school. Yeah, high school. Yeah, Youtube didn't exist. Yeah, so you probably would have been a lot different now, like Oh, yeah, yeah, I mean if if you go on my personal left that you can out sea my oper CD of got highlight, a statistical breakdowns, analysis cross I mean I learned. I learned all the things that if I had I would have definitely been being a recruited sooner. But I think early in my process, like a lot of the resources and the tools and the information available to kids today was an available then. So it was through getting lucky self, reflecting and realizing those lucky that I took self initiative to make sure that I wouldn't ever be lucky again. I would always be in control of what I can control and willing to do the work necessary to reach yeah, definitely, definitely. And I brought up the youtube thing because I actually was a subsitute teacher at one point after college and this kid had fifty four goals in two seasons. He had no offers and I was like that's crazy. And then so I literally just made him a highlight tape and then all of a sudden he's getting all these offers. So that's I pretty much asked that question. Yes, and I mean it makes a lot of sense. Like a lot of players don't understand the business side of the game and marketing and marketability and how important that that piece is into getting seen. I mean, obviously you can be the best player, but if no one ever sees you, it's almost pointless because you could be the worst player, but if everyone sees you, you might end up getting opportunities. So my goal is to give the information and get forth of process that make sure you're viewing bull is a lovely you need to be so that when you're seeing you're prepared for the level you're striving for. Yeah, definitely, and I think we're seeing a lot of the athlete entrepreneurs like on the come up right now, and I'm sure you know that because you're one of them and will be discussing that stuff later. But and what was your overall experience like you see Davis? Well, I had a great experience. I love my time at you see Davis, like I made a lot of friends just from my classes and just like school, from the school perspective, and then a lot of a lot of great friends on the team perspectives of both on and off the field. I mean, college was probably like one of the best experiences I could ever expect to have, with the characters of individuals I met, the friendships and relationships I built and just, you know, the fun and stupid things that you got into, if you know what you're young. Yeah, man, college was a great time. We had a great game of players, of individuals who were just as stubborn as me in the sense of wanting to win every game, like we were willing to fight and work for each other's like a brotherhood, and we just found a way to win. That was kind of our mantra, that was our philosophy, and we didn't really care who you were or how good you were supposed to be. We were going to figure out and find a way to beat you. Yeah, definitely, that's awesome. Yeah, definitely. College is one of those things where they always say like it's the best for years your life, and I didn't believe until I saw it. You know, yes, Y, it's like like an adult. You're not even an adult, but like you're almost as those like it's being an adult, was your responsibility. So it's the best of both world. It's like a four year vacation pretty much. And what about was there a time at UC Davis that you knew you were going to go pro or had a shot at the MLSH? While I was there, I was just there. I was focused on like building my businesses in my entrepreneurial things on the side, and then school and soccer, and I never put any thought into pro or going pro or if I could play pro at all until maybe it was my senior...

...year. That's crazy and if I see you, maybe it might have been after my senior year, like my my last year was done. I remember Chris Paville, I think we're doing like a spring training or something. We're like a training or something, and he was like, Oh, we all know you're going pro and I was like what are you talking about, and he's like, Oh, yeah, you're going to go pro, and that's the first time I've ever even heard that and even thought of it. Right. Oh well, I guess going pro would be pretty cool. I'd be open to that. And then that's pretty much all I really thought about it and then I got invited to the combine, so I was like, okay, I gets me to go to combine, and then I ended up getting drafted to the earthquakes. And then when I got drafted out, I was actually like my Bible one undred four lap and my phone started like blowing up with textsially scaredus, like what happened? So you got drafted by the stand as the earthquakes and I was like okay, the that's cool. was getting grafted that. It means players, like I don't know what that means. So that's got on like wikipedia and I've looked at the coaches name at the time Frank Gallop in the channel, manager on Doyle, and I was like, okay, what's the general manager? What's he do? What's what's all that? And then, yeah, I just jumped all in and said, okay, well, if I'm going to do this, I've better learn everything about it and I want to be the best of my ability and I want to win. So I want to win on and off the field. So I'm going to learn this business, I'm going to learn what it takes and I'm going to do what's necessary to eleven years later, here we are. It's crazy. And what was it like stepping on the pitch for the first time with the SAN JOSE A earthquake? Was that two thousand and nine right, Oh, yeah, there you got, like you're gonna give you the whole bus of stuff. Because, because that my focus wasn't playing pro. I don't have the same types of memories that most pro players have speaking to them, you know, like most of my friends can remember the first time they stepped on the pitch. They can remember their first game and like what they were thinking and how they felt and stuff. I don't. I just showed up and played and I was focused on learning what I needed to do, just stick around and understand the game the way that the people around me looked at the game. So maybe, like when I came to the pro level, there were things that they were expecting me to do that I've never been or understood or saw before. So like, for instance, two is a very popular game and I never saw five to until I went pro. But like thousand first time I ever saw that game and the guys loved it and we played it every single day and I was horrible at it. Right, I got so bad at it and I realized like, Oh, you have to be good at this, otherwise they don't respect you and they don't think that you can play. You know, the like the things I was focused on getting good at and working on were things that the players there had always been doing for a long time. So they didn't think about it. Yeah, but that I was gonna were things that they were eventually going to face at the professional level, but they weren't prepared for it because they had always been the highly touted best player on the field. So most of those guys never had his deal with not playing. You know, I dealt with that before. A lot of those guys that never had a like career ending, or should have been a creating injury. I've broken my femer at twelve years old. It was in a cast over a year, you know, to like at the time I didn't realize that those experiences would serve me so well at this level. But I was looking at the game and focused on things that other people weren't focused on and at the time I couldn't understand why they couldn't see what I was saying at that time, because I also couldn't see what they were saying because a lot of the things that they did, the trainings they did, the coaching they had, the philosophies they had learned from a younger age. I never learned those things. So when I showed up I was probably was just I don't even know what I was. That's you know, they're just like who is this? And he plays super awkwardly like but it's effective at times and there's something about it which why people kept me around. And then when I understood and learned that I've been learned the...

...aspects of the game that I didn't get taught at a young age. So then I had to do extra things to figure those parts of my game out. And you know, as after died, that's why I really talked about the MSL, the Mental Strength League, and developing that out over the years, and that's the reason why I was able to adjust and grow and, you know, stick around. Guess that's yeah, it's crazy story. Tell me. You remember your first goal, though, right. Yes, I remember my first goal because in practice I saw Chris Wondalowski, do you like this little pink kip over the goalie and practice one day and I never seen that before and I was like, Oh, that's pretty good and then in the game we're the only reason I was against fe Dallas has because I've seen that. I've watched the highlight. What I remember? I just remember doing what I saw Wando do you in practice in the game, and that, I thought was my first goal and I scored it. I was like, Oh, okay, I can pick up things and learn from the players around me and I'll integrate that into my game because up to that point, like I said, none of the players I played with at Youth Soccer Played College Division One soccer. Yeah, right, so I was a practicing every day with highly cowted, top players, you know. So there's a lot of stuff I never saw and I wasn't watching soccer on TV because I wasn't a fan of the plan of playing, but I was a fan of like watching a TV. Yeah, I was doing a bird of activities, those, you know, working on businesses and do stuff like that. So I just enjoyed playing. So I've always learned from the players around me. So it's kind of playing up to you the level of your competition, right. And so then if we made it part en up in a turn, maybe once every two or three months, we make it fart enough in a term it to play against the kids who probably were going to go play at a division one level. You know, that's what I get to test myself. So I wouldn't see too much, I couldn't take up a whole lot. But then when I get to the pro level, now I'm seeing like guys who are extremely hyper specialized at one particular thing, like really good at certain things, and I can go like Oh, I like those aspects of their game where I like that moment, I like that movement, I like that idea. So I started adopted nose and start implementing them into my game so that I distinctly remember my first school, because I distinctly remember why I scored my first school and where I learned that it. Don't necessarily remember the whole action of the game. Assign from like watching the highlight. Yeah, I remember how I learned it much more clearly than actually doing it. Yeah, you got you and in two thousand and ten your trade to the Colorado rapids, which you guys eventually won the MLS Cup. So what was it like when in the MLS Coupe? Oh Man, yeah, so the first thing was like, okay, I got traded. Okay, what's that mean? Right, like, what what is that like? What does that actually mean? Like, what do I have to do? What about obbligation? One are my responsibilities? How does this work? So then I was like, okay, really getting involved with this heat under staying the Heba Union, how that all works, and an entire process and then joining the team. I left out in terms of like the team I joined. It is like a great group of guys, like or my groomsmen, or five of my groomsmen, or teammates of mine that I met at in Colorado on the rapids, that two thousand and ten team. So it was just the perfect form of individual. That's also where I met Ross, where we started perfect soccer. The idea came together on the recruiting blueprints book that we had written. Yeah, so that the time in Colorado was almost be like if you got to do college for a second time, you know. M Just like yeah, you're there with your boys, you all have chips on your shoulder. You want to win. Every day you're grinding because you want to prove yourself. You're trying to earn your stripes, but then you're working hard every day to beat the veteran guys. You know your Poplos, your drew more's, your Juffle Reno with your Conner Casey, your Omer coomings, like we had a really good squat Brian Mullen, like man Claudio Lopez, Jamie Smith, those Kate...

Camra, like older guys, you want to beat them every day. Gary Smith was the coach at the time and he would very much loved his veteran players. So he was always young verse old. So it's just competition every day and I love competition. I just you know, I love to compete and I want to end and so did the guys who were there at that time, young guys, and we just fought every day and it made up better, it made the better guys better and I think that that's a huge reason why we went on to win an MLS Cup, because of those young guys and the character in the personalities of those young guys and just relentlessly every single day. It was competition and no one wanted to lose and what it created was on the weekend you knew we weren't going to lose the game, which is a really great place to be in on a team side because your confidence, your your your understanding of your teammates role next to do. Now it's not necessarily the play I'd want to play and it definitely wasn't fun to be a young guy in those systems because you knew you were going to get your opportunity. But, having said that, it was effective for executing Gary's vision on what he felt would be necessary to create a team that can make the playoffs. But I think it's how we interacted with each other during the year and how we push each other in the year that give us the ability to make the run in the playoffs win the championship. I think the championship cuts down to like guys willingness to work and fight for each other and belief in the man next to you, especially in MLS. They definitely, definitely, and I know after Colorado then you had a short sit in Toronto and then you went to Chicago fires. You were a trade a couple times. So I know you you touch on it a little being trade, but what's it like to just like literally like pick up and move all your stuff like from city to a new city? It's hard for me to answer that because it's so normal to me now. Yeah, like it's just part of the job, right. It's like, yeah, it's part of if you're not the number one guy and you're not the most highly tauted guy, if you're not marketed by the league and you're not the number one guy. Like I said, I've always been on a team of Misfit I've always been the odd guy out, like awkward style, but works really hard. Is Effective, increase havoc, increase opportunities, but it doesn't look like how we want it to look. So it's just like what do we do? We want it? Do we not want it? Right? So just like carved up kind of a brand for myself in the sense of you know what I am and you know what you get, but it might not be exactly what you're looking for on look, until you have no other options, which sounds really bad when you hear that out loud. But there's that role, that role needs to be played and I understand that role and claim that role. Means you're used, when you're used and then you're thrown out, when you're thrown out and you're moved on. But what's most important is the relationships you build and how you treat people where you're at and your principles, because that is what people know you for and why other people will recommend you to the next place, because many people may think, okay, you've been traded multiple times, there must be a problem with there. Right, like, yeah, why are you getting to all these different places? There is a problem. The problem is they weren't expecting me to be as good as I was or create as much havoc as I do on the fields. Right, like they're thinking you're going to be someone that we may or may not use off the bench sporadically from time to time, but every single day I competing and Tractic, I'm winning games, I'm working hard, when I give my opportunities, I'm creating chances for the guys around me. And now you're kind of going like, well, we weren't ever thinking of making you our number one. No, so we're paying the number one a lot of money. We're not paying you very much money. So we need to trade you, because we can't really give you an actual, honest reason why you're not getting an opportunity here, beyond the fact that, like, we're not doing poorly and you're a...

...player that we only bring in when the teams doing poorly, you know. So I understand why I've been able to stick around as long as I have and as my career has gone on longer and longer and for more people understand who I am and how I play and my principles and my willingness to be a team player. I believe that people are willing to back me in terms of recommending that another team takeing or bring me in, you know, because of those qualities. Yeah, I see. I understand that. With that comes a lot of movement and being all over the place, which means I'm just figured out how to quickly adapt to new environments and Excel in those environments. Now that I've been doing it for a ten years, I'm getting like ridiculously good at it and I think it just catches people off guard because they're just like, I'm moving too fast. Yeah, but it's necessary. If I didn't learn how to move back and how to adapt, you how to adjust and integrate into a system and provide value, if I didn't learn how to do that, how to do that quickly, I wouldn't be here, you know. So to an adapter die type of thing and people have an idea of what they think I am and what I'm going to be able to do, and then I show up and it way more than they were expecting. You know, like I tore my acl Lcale by symptoms, I band poctility attendant in that game against Kansas City like two years ago. Everyone's thinking that, you know, that's careerating injury. There's no way I'm coming back. That's maybe eighteen months recovery time and I'm back in seven months. You know, like people aren't. Yeah, they're not prepared for that. They're thinking your career is over and you won't. If you ever do come back, you won't be for a year and a half. And you you know you'll be thirty years old when it happens, or thirty one. So there's no chance it's over now. It'll Sune. You're back in seven months fighting for a spot. Like they're not ready for that. Yeah, for sure. And I know what we just talked about the trades, but what was it again? Traded back to San Jose in two thousand and fifteen. It's interesting because when I was first with San Jose A, we're at Buckshof stadium right and our locker room was probably I don't even know. Fifteen feet by fifteen pek probably exaggerated, but it's pretty small right. And when I come back we're to buy a day be a you know. So the organization has grown up quite a bit from when I was there before, at least in the facilities, from the facilities perspective. And you know, he was kind of a school circle thing. John Doyle was still the general manager when he had brought me back and it was interesting to have conversations with him, you know, after several years of learning the League and understanding his role and job and responsibility and how that works, and then also getting to know and understand dumb engineer, his style, how he liked to play and like what he expected of his players. You know, I think I prized him especially. I would say that ton doyle was one who brought me back against him were to a a. You know, his concerts have towards the in the year. We're not doing so great this year. We need someone to step in and help Wando. What do we have to lose, you know, and then I came in and if BHC even if you talk to Don Himself, I'm pretty sure he would even agree, like yeah, it was really expected much out of me. You know, it was like, okay, let's see what happens. But I feel like halfway through my time there, you know, within a month, I think how I play and how I purged the game very much the lines with Tom's philosophy and, you know, the teams he likes to build. So he was a huge advocate for me and I really appreciated his willingness to see the value and me and commit to me and want to build with me. And unfortunately, you know, I got the lay injury into the first year and in the time it took me to get back, like I said, I was trying to get back as good as possible. He ended up getting wet goods coach. They end up changing over with the general manager in John Doyle, and you know, the new regime came in and you know, that was an experience. Like I learned...

...a whole lot from my time there. So definitely, definitely. And then what was it like, say, playing in Canada and the MLS versus, like playing in the US for them off when I was in Canada the first time with Toronto? Yeah, they had all the peoples they needed to be successful. They just didn't have the right philosophy in the sense that the American mentality in mindset is different than the Canadian mentality in mindset and one where the American mindset will win out, just in a pure like headtohead. So they had the facilities, they had the fans, they had the investment, the field everything. They just didn't have an understanding of how to compete. Yeah, and win. But then by the second time it came around, when I was with them a second stent and in Montreal, so I was interning the first Montreal. The second time around, you can tell that the Canadian teams have mature. They understand the league better if they make moves in alignment with like what it takes to win, not necessarily what you want it to look like, which is a huge I think it's largely important. I think a lot of people make the mistake of some people say I just want to be happy. Right, so they I just want to be happy, and then I can say listen, to be happy fee all you use queer job, work cooper part time, you know, and kill and watch netflix and go for walks every day. You'll be super, super happy. Right, but then we'll be like, no, I want to be happy, but I want to make its figures and I want to have a dream job and I want to be an entrepreneur and I want to start a business that changes people's lives. Right, yeah, now, go like to do that. You'RE gonna have to spend a lot of time being unhappy because you're gonna have to do a lot of things you don't necessarily want to do to accomplish that goal. Right. So, like, is it that you want to be happy, or is it that you want it to look a certain way and be happy? And most people want it to look a certain way and to be happy, and I'm going like, okay. Or to be rich. Oh, I want to have a lot of money. Okay, what are you willing to do to have a lot of money? Well, I want to watch Netflix all day, I want to study what I want to study, I want to hang out with my friends and I want to just like kill. Okay, you can't do that. Make a whole lot of money, you know it, and figure out a way to do that. Let me know. I'll invest with you. Just like the idea of like not understanding that it won't look how you want it to. Look. So what is important is understanding what it is that you actually want and, more importantly, what you're willing or not willing to do to make it happen. I think that's extremely important and it's a subtle thing and because of subtle most people might not think it's that Beau of a deal, but it's really that's a it's a big thing. Like yeah, and I totally understand what you're what you're saying, picking up where you're putting down. And this offseason you're like at first time free agent. So what was it like picking and then you? Why did you pick DC UNITED? It was interesting from the perspective of, like, you have the ability to be a free agent. It's all free agency with stipulations, right. The leak has all of its rules and all of its constrictions and the ways operation has been so like controlled that even having, quote unquote, free agency or freedom is controlled freedom, right, and limited freedom as well to you. So it's the first couple years of the process. So not all organizations that figured it out, neither have all the players figured it out right. No, it was interesting in the in the sense that you have the ability to choose where you wanted to go, but let's say your free market value is still controlled because of the limited free agency ability. So that was that's a lot in terms of that, but in short, like nice to be able to get to negotiate with the idea...

...that you have the ability to go somewhere that you choose, as opposed to just hey, you can trade it here, get up in the leap right. So that was that was a positive. That's what I liked about it and the reason why I chose DC united was I felt a great opportunity to to join an organization that I had played against a lot over the years and I had seen the style that they play and how they approach the game and felt that my abilities would fit well. I know that band has been with the Organization for a long time, so I knew that he would be familiar with me and what I bring to the table. And, you know, I also saw that, you know, they may out he yield as the new stadium and facility and you know, the organization is kind of going through a transitional phase where it's kind of wanting to make that leap to what I called MLS three point. Oh, you know, like the league growing and different teams grow at different rates and I think DC's at that point where it's wanting to make that leap into being, you know, seeing what it was considered in the past, and I, you know, I looked at that as an opportunity to be a part of that and hopefully contribute in a manner that beats more opportunity for me in the future. Yeah, definitely actually that. It's perfect. To my question. Or now is was most change with the MLS since you entered in two thousand and nine? Is Most change the MLS? From which perspective? I mean, just like the girl, I mean even, like you said, like San Jose at first, like the locker rooms are like probably not to standards. Now, like everything, like even you're just mentioned in just like different teams are like leveling up. Like it seems like consistently grow. It seems like it seems like every you know, I mean like it seems like everywhere you've gone to keeps on getting bigger and better and bigger and better, like the League itself. I think the League is at a point now that organizations who wants to nickel and dime and have the old mls. One point of mentality get exposed in aren't going to be successful. And that's a good thing because now it's forcing all teams to get to a level of professionalism that's in alignment with the goals that Don garber has said he wants to see the MLS become, right, but top destination league, forget by what year, like top three league or something like that. Well, to achieve that, the level of facility and the level of professionalism and the level of pay and the level of attention on the League needs to reflect that, and the only way that that happens is if ownership and the league itself is making investments from the bottom up, not just from the top down, which is kind of what the model was before, you know, so to that point, having a stadium at like a Buckshaw stadium, though, was great when we started out nine that shouldn't be even considered. Okay right like that's not for the level that MLS wants to be at and where the League is at now, and I think there's still that at old mentality, the old mindset is still attached to the league. That I think is slowing down its growth and progress, though it has made a lot of progress up to this point. Think the big changes I've seen is in the Organization of the Union and the understanding of the player pool to better organize and communicate and understand our position in the process of the growth of the league. See what else has changed? I think the overall soccer IQ and tactics and philosophies of the game completely changed. Like mind set. The idea of what it took to win in mls in two thousand and nine is completely different than the ideas of mindset of what the League believes is necessary to win today. So it's been interesting to see that transmission. Yeah, definitely. I mean even just as a follower of sports in general, I just seen the increasing amount of just mls stuff just on TV itself. Like I'm like two thousand...

...and nine hour and really remember seeing any mls stuff, but now I think it's all over the place. I think it's good and all, like the new expansion teams and a lot of crazy fans and all that good stuff. Yeah, I mean I think that's what has been awesome. Like the loyalty of the bands across the League is really cool in like, you know, a big reason why I started by Youtube Channel and the quincy type stuff balls in Chicago because there's just like an opportunity to like engage with the fans outside of soccer and kind of just also create a connection between the fans and my teammates, who I thought were just funny people and good guys, just like characters that no one ever got a chance to know, and I got to deal with them every day and create a bond that's bigger than just like hey, your job is to go out there and, you know, score bowl on the weekend and if you don't, you're terrible person and you miss that goal on purpose and you stuff. You know, it's hard to say that it's someone that you know. You participated in the giveaway having good time and watch them good content and learned about that person's story. You know, you're going to be more understanding, but also you need more bonded to the brand. You can be more bonded to the team and you're going to help create a culture that creates a winning mentality. So definitely not jumping into your entrepreneurial Stif I know you've been at it since a young age. So you want to just give me this like a brief summery of like stuff you're working on. I know like the soccer stuff, and then I know you like live every week and I got a marketing company to Right. Yeah, so maybe I'll give that. So I've always been kind of a serial entrepreneur from young age, find and selling anything and everything it could from a young age of like four years old on. I just like the idea of like transactions and learning how people think and why they make the decisions that they do, and business is a great hful in entrepreneurship is a great vehicle to to better understand other people, which is always been my goal. Fast forward through kind of you know, high school, College and pro. Really, when I went pro we touched on it a bit. I wasn't the highly tap a person. I haven't been someone that, like the League, is looking to promote and put marking dollars and stuff behind, but I realized that marketability, especially with where the League was at in two thousand and nine and was extremely important and something that you needed to be able to showcase the league that you provide value beyond on the field. You know, if you're thinking about in two thousand and twelve, thirteen, fourteen fifteen, the league was getting big name players and bringing them over so they could bring attention to our league. You weren't necessarily really focused on the qualities in the level of play on the field. Not to say that that wasn't something that they cared about. It just wasn't as high a priority as it was getting big name players over here. Right point to that would be like leaning back them over here doing that big deal, big adidas deal. I think it's like two und fifty million dollars plus. Could Franchise a future club it of buying them. I think it's like twenty five million or maybe a thirty million dollars. Right like. That was the least focus at that time and when I was there and I was looking at it, those doing okay. Even if I'm doing well on the field, which I am, like statistics wise, like per minutes, I don't get a lot of minutes in time, but when I do play I do well. So, for instance, I think two thousand and fourteen I got like two hundred and ninety NIN minutes, but I have four goals in the two hundred and ninety nine miutes. So like my goals per minute basio was very good. And then I had like a penalty or two drawn as well too. But I realized, okay, that's not getting me more playtime and that's not getting me visibility or increasing my value in the league. And we did do something beyond that that sets myself apart. That's really where I was going, like, okay, I need to start my marketing company, and through that I started understanding paid advertising, a billion marketing, email, mark, webs Sye, creed, video editing, music production, by literally everything, needing everything takes to build a stain an online business, and I basically was going out to all right, I'm a marketing and Marketing Agency and Law Firm and my first clients is Lee Quincy Maricle. Right, it's a professional player. He's giving this agent who these coincy the ability to build and...

...grow the brand, along with my wife, Brina. So the two of US built the agency and I was the first client and with that we built perfect soccer, which is the e commerce brand. We built Leverage Investment Group, which is the financial literacy, Finance Literacy website, budsting website, as well as basically our investment fund for currency, stock market options, trading talks and bonds, and then brand building in our EA confer side, and then our Amazon and then our youtube and video editing and content creation. So with the start and launch of quickly time balls with Chicago, building that Youtube series in that show was the way in which I really learned and understood the marketing side of it and how that plays the huge role in your ability to get on the field and the following and fan base that you build outside of that. And it's going through that process and trying different things in different ideas, we would adjust and build the company to reflect that. So we now are at a point where perfect soccer alane has thirteen employees and then thirteen fool time employees and you know, anywhere from three to seven people who work part time or on contract as needed, and we've built a network of basically an entire sports marketing agency that can facilitate every step of the process for players from six years old all the way up to twenty, up to thirty six, during career and post career, because these are all the things that I needed for myself and I didn't have access to that. I didn't have a team of individuals doing that for me. I just had to work to build it for myself and invest in building a team and figure out how to make it work and bring it all together, because if I didn't, like I said earlier, adapter die like if I didn't do this, so still wouldn't be here. So, like I said, I would. I was lucky once in when, you know, that last game of my last tournament, and after that happened, I said, okay, I won't, I won't be lucky again. This is going to be by design. I'm going to figure out how this works. I'm going to create a process that can be duplicated by others so they can overcome the obstacles and the road blocks that I ran into along the way that I personally feel didn't need to be there or were or were intentionally put their sabotage others or take advantage of others. I've seen so many people take advantage of young soccer players because they just only focus on and no soccer and and they're votable because of that. And there's a lot of there's a lot of good people, but there's a lot of people who don't have players best interest in mind, and Michael has basically just been to learn how they're taking advantage of players and then create systems and put in place processes so that they can never do that again. Yeah, definitely, that's that's some good stuff right there. Are you ready for some fun questions? are going to go from average to savage. Okay, what do you like to do in your free time? I like to work. Okay, kind of, I kind of figured out. Yeah, I like to work because I define work is life, because I think, yeah, I find work is life, because I think life is worked, but I can find life as passion, because I want my life to be what I'm passionate about. Yeah, definitely, definitely what I'm doing. That's my life and my life is going to be worked. So I enjoy working on the things that work on, and what I like working on is creating, creating ways for the people around me to reach their foolish potential. That's really what I enjoyed doing, and that's a guy's it. What about what are three jerseys that you don't own that you want? Three Jersey's I don't want? That's a good that's a really good question. Probably if I don't want anybody's jerseys, but I'm trying to. I've got all the People's jerseys that I want. All right, it's usually like my teammates. I want Danny, who's in Jersey this...

Saturday in the game because we play Santa's A. I want I want BACCO's jerseys. Will Do. I'm just going to take all of my old teammates jerseys this weekend all to give them to me. I don't take it. And last one. Is it harder to, like, play and train for soccer, or is it harder to be entrepreneurs? We harder to train and play for soccer. All right, I asked the NFL player that he said entrepreneurship was harder. Comes naturally to me. Yeah, I guess playing professional soccer the way I've chosen to play professional from pro. If I pro soccer the way that I feel like a lot of my teammates did, entrepreneur would definitely be way harder. But I had to develop the mental strength, Lye. To make this work at the pro level. So now like taking these ideas from here and implementing them into my business and stuff. That's like my break. Yeah, definitely. Yeah, yeah. The things I don't like about pro soccer, the ideas that I don't like, the philosophies I don't like I create my own ideas of philosophies that I think will be better and I implement them in my business, and my business is actually like my escape from the things that are within my control, professional sports. Gotcha. Gotcha. Well, I really appreciate you coming on and we could do what the people know where they can find you on social media and plug in some of your websites. Yeah, people can join my news letter at Quincy Maer Quacom, so Cui, and see why. Ama Rikwacom, if you're interested in kind of my financial literacy newsletter and building your own business or starting your own business and marketability and all that, you can go to Leverage Investment Groupcom if you will need done for you services and representation or marketing agency to help you grow as dating your brand, you can go evolve, the online evlv dot online, and most people probably fall on for the soccer side of stuff, so definitely had to perfect soccer skillscom to get anything and everything you need. Perfect soccer is a platform to connect with and learn from pro soccer players and you can join me every Thursday at six t mpt going live on the perfect soccer instagram account at perfect underscore soccer discussing the MSL Mental Strength League on the Hashtag as a soccer pro show, where I go live every week and break down the ideas of velocities, of everything that I have been working on a developing over the course of my now eleven year professional career and break them down into you like step by step processes that you can apply to hopefully reread your perfect life and reach whatever level or goals on and off the field you're wanting to achieve. We're building a dope community. We've got a lot of people who join us and there's a lot of great stories that are coming out of it. So love to see you guys join me over there that I appreciate it again, and best of luck the rest of the season. Awesome. Thanks so much. appreciated.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (171)