Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 2 years ago

Ronnie Brown | Average to Savage EP84

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the eighty-forth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring former Pro Bowl NFL running back and entrepreneur Ronnie Brown. Paul Guarino talked with Ronnie Brown discussing his career after football, his time at Auburn, and his experience in the NFL with the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles, San Diego Chargers and Houston Texans. Follow Ronnie Brown https://www.instagram.com/ronnie23brown/ Podcast interview with Ronnie Brown originally recorded February 6, 2020

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Greno, everyone in anyone, athletes sets and much more. It's up, everybody and back for another episode of the average savage podcast. Or special guests. Today it's former NFL player Ronnie Brown. Ronnie, how's it going? Pretty good, man, pretty good. How I you said it's going good. Appreciate you coming on. I know we've been playing a little phone tag but you know, finally got it. You on Tom Pumped about it. Yeah, and I'm excited to be on here. I appreciate you bad before we go into your NFL care what have what is Ronnie Brown been up to nowadays after retirement time? And I when I first got done, you know, chasing the little golf ball for a while. Really enjoy that, you know. It's one of my favorite things to do now, and that that I'm very good at it, but I just like it. But then, outside of bed, you know, I started doing some freelance work, that work with their the radio broadcast crew down at Auburn on the weekend doing some radio stuff, kind of staying close and being able to mentor a lot of the young guys and Tlete me close to the program and then outside of bed, I'm working as a financial professional now. So when it got license and register, you know, working as a financial visor. Now, how did you get into that financial adviser? I was interested in you know, as I kind of got out of college, you know, as a communications graduate, and I wanted to go into, you know, the broadcasting field, but I think it was just more so that was familiar territory. But as I kind of navigated my way through my career, you know, through injuries and through different things and seeing, you know, things change, you know, I was interested in the business side and so and seeing that, you know, I just felt like, you know, I wanted to do something one to educate myself, but then too, as I got older, you know, just kind of looking at, you know, where I was and how far I had come just in terms of knowledge, wise and, you know, understanding of the business and, you know, seeing a lot of young guys come in, they reminded me of myself. You know, I wanted to have an impact. So when I retired, you know, trying to figure out the best way to be able to assist a lot of these individuals and and you know, make it different and you know, I feel like that's the challenging area for a lot of people. You look at the statistics of you know, seventy eight percent of NFL players, you know, either go broke or have some kind of financial difficulties within three years of being retired out of the NFL, and then I think it's sixty percent of NBA guys within five years. So when you look at the statistical numbers, you know it doesn't typically make sense to the public, but for me going through it, an understanding there not really coming out of a situation where I was, you know, as financial literate as I would have liked to have been. You know, I felt like this is a great opportunity to come in and help a lot of these individuals that understand the importance of what well to building is and accumulating wealth and, you know, being able to transfer that well to generation. So, you know, I just kind of embarked on that journey. I was fortunate up I was around a few individuals while I was in Miami, you know, and we opened up a community bank and so that was a start and that was the catalyst for me trying to learn and get the information. Yeah, are you working with that fhon guys earner. So yeah, so I have a few guys that we work with. Have a couple NBA guys on a team. We work with current Golfer as well, but just, you know, I think doing that. And then we also work with none athlete. So, you know, my goal is realizing that since I've retired. But you know, as I continue to go and progress each level, there was a lot of people that assisted me in this process, you know, whether it's coaches, teachers, are, you know, very influential people that I've come across. You know. So just in knowing that everybody who has some type of success story has had individuals in their lives that have helped, you know, to get to that point. So, you know, it's my goal, to my obligation. I just feel, you know, dedicated. I want to give back to people like, you know, people someone, some of the people gave to me. And so, you know, being in this field, I think it's it's rewarding to see people get that...

...financial comfort, you know, and knowing to have us to plan and then to see the plan come, you know, into work, into end envision to end busying that plan, you know, and kind of strategic to keep working at a building. You know, you know, I think things great, feeling comfort in that and then so, you know, I just kind of been excited about it. I love doing it. It's a great opportunity for me to meet a lot of New People. It's something that I enjoy. So it just, you know, it's become a passion and, you know, I think I finally found my purpose. You know, I enjoy playing sports, but you know, I think you look at life, it's more about how can you help other people? Yeah, I'm going to the financed another finance question. Like, I know your drafted number two overall pick. So when you were coming out of college, was there like a lot of people like coming out for you trying to like either be your financial wiz or like trying to get you to invest money into random startups and stuff like that? Yeah, and so, you know, when I looked at that, that was part of, you know, the interest in it, because I had no idea, like one, how to choose a lot of these professionals to work with, whether it's financial or agents. But then it's navigating through those waters, you just kind of realize how much you don't know and how ill equipped I was to be in that position, you know, financially, like so many people see all man you made it and you get this amount of money, but you think of guys coming out of situations who've never been infamiliar territory, you know, to get that lump some of money. But then you know come out of, you know, fat financially challenge situations growing up and upbringing. You know that presents a burden because you know you want to help everyone, but then you still have to get acclimated, get adjusted to your new lifestyle. Then you trying to get acclimated to a new city and then you have people coming in and there's, you know, some people good, some are bad, but so many opportunity. These a rise and you know it's just so much to happen at one time that a lot of people don't understand. And so it's not like building a business where it's a gradual success or. You work, you know, thirty years for a company and then you start getting a salary and then now you made your way up the ladder and so so it's just a little different. So trying to really get into buses. Understand that and even you know the guys in those situates of like man, listen, you can't fix the problem that you've been herd like throughout your lifespan all in one year. So you know, coming up with the TV plan is really important, and that's anyone. You Know Your Business are an athlete and non athlete like I think the same mentality is, you know, I think, trying to create generational wealth. But you know, you have to have a plan, and I don't care how much money you have. You know, if your Bill Gates, he still has a financial plan that he works and he has a lot of the amount of money that he wants to spend every year. Any budgets, I'm sure, and gives away a certain amount. So you still have to have a planet that matter how much money you have just got there. You know, have a plan, and I think that's why I also going back to when you said athlete or not, I feel like that's why I always companies are always looking to higher athletes because like motivation got room through sports and stuff like that. And then, yeah, I'm guessing. I pretty much know. I think that it's probably crazier now with social media, with guys getting reached out to you by random people. When versus when you got drafted in two thousand and five right, and it's just, you know, because you so excessle you know where the social media always available, you know, and you we walk around with these mini computers. You know, we always have access to what's going on in the world and you know you have Google that you can go find out stuff. But then you know just you know, being able to get in contact with people. You know so many ways to do that. You keep an eye out see what's going on a lot of people's lives. So you know, you're constantly exposed to, you know people and you know you have access to other people. So that is something you have to deal with and trying to navigate that piece of it. You know, I think individuals have to learn that as well. What's your what's your take on...

...like you played kind of, I'd say, like during the early part of the Social Media Age, and now it's like I wouldn't even say it's a peek, because I think it's still grown. Like you think, you rather be like at the starter, like right now, like when it's grown even more. Well, I think is you know, when you go through the maturation process, like obviously I've learned a lot more since, you know, I was playing. But to go back, I mean I think these guys are a little bit more aware because I don't know if it's the concussion situation or you know, if you look across the professional sports, you know, guys seem to be retiring a little bit earlier with their heal and you know. So I think it's a little bit more conscious of what they want to do. So, you know, I think it's good and the money's, you know, going up. So you know, I think they're positives to that. But then also, you know, for me, just being who I am, I just feel that, you know, my timing was when time and was supposed to and you know, I feel like everything's supposed to happen, you know, always does, and so just kind of have to just roll with the punches and you know, now I feel obligated to be able to help a lot of these younger guys not hit the same purdles that I hit. Yeah, now going back to your football days, what got you involved in football when you were young? I had an older brother. I have an older brother who was very like sports involved. He was involved in sports, and so he was baseball, player played football, he wrestled, so he was really active. And then so for me, you know, I was always interested this growing up and being around it. You know, I became interested in it and it became my passion and ultimately, for like like many other individuals, it became my escape, you know, to get a get away from, you know, norm reality, the pressure of what you dealing where you just get me go on that football field and you don't have the relaxation of being in the game and just the pure joy of being, you know, able to play with your body's and have fun. Yeah, what was your recruiting process like out of high school? It was great. You know, I grew up a Georgia band because I I'm from Georgia. So, you know, I just looking at that. You know, I didn't think about the honesty, I weren't. I wasn't thinking of a sophomore. I want to get a scholarship and go through this school or this school. I just like Georgia, but you know, I didn't know it did be scholarship related, whether it was football whatever. So just in going through all the bed man, you know, just enjoying football in the process and baseball with my favorite sport growing up actually, but you know, just the pad that was was laid out for me. You know, it worked out. I had a fairly decent career in high school and you know, got a few scholarship offers and you know, I wasn't recruited heavily by Georgia early and then started getting a little bit more. But by that time, you know, I was feeling, you know, pretty comfortable with alburn and Tennessee and I actually committed the Tennessee and ended up changing my mind and going down to all of them because I just feel it was the best fit for me being from a small town, and so it worked out and you know, I just feel like that was the path that was chosen for me. And what was your overall experience like at Auburn? I know you know the amazing career there. It was great. You know, it was challenging. You know, I got in. I was being recruited and obviously when you get recruited, you know you see the best of the best when you tour and go to these different schools. But you know, I think for me, you know, I got there and then we had a guy by the name of Rudy Johnson, who came from junior college, who was a hanckup of athlete. So led the SEC Russian and his first year there went on to play professionally and then the next season, you know, I had Katini Williams come in. So you know, it was it was a lot of adversity, but you know, it was worth it in the end. You know, maybe stronger as an individual, maybe a better teammate, you know, and just made me a better person. So, you know, I wouldn't change any of those experiences for anything because I feel like that's a...

...part of my story and that's what made me, you know, who I am and from view life the way that I do. Would you say you and Catialoc were run the best duos ever? I mean, I think that's depending on who you're asking. For me, I feel like we had a pretty good career. I think we complimented each other really well, but I wouldn't say, Hey, yeah, where it's the best duohever. I just feel like we did what we're supposed to do. We enjoyed each other's company, we were great teammates and we had fairly successful car college career. And Yeah, the year two thousand and four was when you guys went thirteen, you know, and you were you didn't get picked for the National Championship. So what's your feelings in and then what you're feeling now with that they had the playoff? You know, I feel we played a part in that. You know, it was unfortunate because to go undefeated in this conference is tough enough, but in doing that and not getting that opportunity, I think that's where, you know, the playoff system kind of evolved from like having that experience. So, you know, I mean I hate that we didn't get a chance to play for the next some championship, but I mean I think something good came out of it and I don't think that's situations that ever occur again, where you see a team, you know, representing the a sec, go undefeated in that you know, get a shot to be in the playoffs. Yeah, I think that that's where today, mine helped you more with the just the more media exposure, right. So yeah, I think, you know, we had to you know, we were the first one over the hill, so we had to take all their shots. I guess, you know, hopefully that's not a bad saying, but do I think you know, we kind of helped aid in the process. Yeah, and what about what was was like a moment when you're at Auburn Day, like you knew or thought you could go to the NFL. Really, I think I always wanted, there's always been a lifelong dream to be antil player, but to get that close. You know, my junior year I had, you know, a couple season. While I did decent, I knew there was an opportunity. I didn't know, you know, what it would look like, but you know, I think just getting the opportunity to be in there. So he got closer and then, you know, I didn't know what draft I wasn't thinking about I just want to get drafted, to get the opportunity. I wasn't think you know, everyone wants to be drafted in the first round, but you know, at the same time the likelihood it's really difficult. So, you know, after my senior year I started to realize a little bit more that, you know, just through hearing the media and just kind of continue to, you know, have the career was just it became possibility. Yeah, and what was it? What was it like? Just going in like the combine and then training for the draft and then like what were the what was it like? Just like hearing about where you're going to drafted, who my draft you, stuff like that. It was exciting. You know, for me it was all about getting closer to that opportunity. Like, at the end of the day, you know, we're not all going to get drafted in the first round, we're not all going to, you know, Gett an opportunity. So for me it was just I just appreciate this opportunity that I have and so each step, you know, where the day that I embraced and as an opportunity to get one step closer to fill in that dream. And you know, when I was working out, I approached it that way. And then going to the COMEBAT and even being a part of that, you know, it was an opportunity to display, you know, that comfort that I had felt because of all the preparation, and so, you know, it was a great opportunity for me and I was like, you know, I wasn't really the number one guy, wasn't the best running back coming out, I don't think in terms of, you know, the notoriety, but I feel comfortable what I could do and I always worked hard and you know, I feel comfortable and given everything that I had. So you know, whatever happened would happen. You're used...

...to US too. Humble on yourself. And then what was drafted like? It was amazing. You know, I got an invitation. I was nervous. I didn't want to go to New York early on, but, you know, a great opportunity and decided to go up to New York and it was great to see my family and the people that experience that day with me. It was really important and I just enjoyed it, like I mean, never did I think that I'd be the second pick in the NFL draft. You know, a little kid out of a small town going to Alvern and then have that experience. So, you know, it was somewhat surreal even now as I look back on it, you know, but at the same time I'm very appreciative and grateful. So it was just great to be there and see my family share that moment with me. It was pretty big. Did you know the dolphins are going to pick you R? Did you know, like what teams were like trying to get it? I did it. I ain going into it. I was looking I thought that after Alex Smith got drafted. I was looking at Brenon net words. I was thinking that he probably get drafted eggs and then I don't know what we happened, but I didn't think I go to somewhere like I am now. I was like maybe I'll end up somewhere cold and somewhere that none of us really want to go. But you know, at the same time, the opportunity was like, I just get an opportunity play in the field, so I'm cool with that. Yeah, and you, even though you just said you didn't think you're one of the best running backs, you were the first running back picked and as a second pick. And Yeah, what was that like going down to Miami and playing for the Dolphins? Well, was great, you know for me, because I was saying that, because I was never really considered the starting running back. So, okay, I didn't get the bulk of the Carrie, but you know, carnel and I, Kadillac and I, we had a great working relationship in terms of, you know, playing together compliment each other, so it was a great experience. So to get to Miami, it was great. The weather was great. You know, it's a great city. Everybody wants to go to. So, you know, that was a huge part of it. But then, letally, you know, going to a city and a team where I had some better and leadership. They kind of showed me the way, you know, that was that was good. So it worked out, you know, the way it did should have. And you being in Miami, I enjoyed the city, enjoyed the people, I enjoyed the community and enjoy of being a part of that, you know, being a part of you know, going into or trying to get back, like I was, staying to the comparity. You know, I just kind of embrace the whole part of it and was just understanding that it was really, you know, blessed and people and get that opportunity. Then I think I would I want to say that you would kind of like Williams, would probably had to be the highest two running backs that were on the same team like ever, because I don't think there was never two running backs in the same school. You know that we're dropt h five. So yeah, what's you know, which is cool about that too, because you know, he and I grew closer, you know, throughout relationship and you know our experiences and you know, even similar backgrounds in terms of, you know, what happened away from the football field. So we got pretty close and so we still have a close relationship now. So, you know, that's the cool part about sports. You know, I enjoyed the game, I love the game and the opportunities are awarded me, but the people that I met along the way, like that was the special piece of it. Like I don't miss the game now, but I miss being in the locker room. I'm joking with those guys that I've met. You know, that's going through work out, that's pushing ourselves, you know, beyond the limits of what we thought we could get through at then, you know, overcoming and being in in Games together and the challenges that that presented and and winning and going through the defeats and being able to, you know, console each other. I think that's that's what makes sports special. There's something common theme when I interview former athletes. They always say that or what they'll miss the motion. Everyone always says like the camarader and all that. That's the big part about it, like that's that's what guys miss, I think. And what was it like playing with Ricky Williams? It was school. Ricky...

...was one of my end up being one of my good friends, you know. And so look at you know, like when you see me, like the I guess, like his personality or what people aught of him on TV, and then actually get a in a meeting room with him and get to know him as a person. You know, he's one of the nicest, most, you know, interesting individuals but at the same time intelligent, you know, not really into a lot of stuff outside of playing football. Wasn't interest it. And the part about, you know, being a celebrity and all of that. He's just been break down the earth person. So we got no each other really well. He was in my weddings, so he and I became pretty good friends. You got you gotta tell me how did how the wild card came at. The wildcat came about. You know, we had coach day to Lee who was in Arkansas with Felix stone and dark and the pad and and Hayton, and so he actually and introduced it to us, and so we were talking about it in other and yeah, like I do it. I want to beat a quarterback. I didn't say quarterback for any level. So you get that opportunity on that level. We were all about it and so we put it in and, you know, I think we explored with it a few times of practice or a couple weeks and then going into New England that week that year we were oning to so we pretty much had to pull out all stops and it had to FIS. We enjoyed it and end up working out. And then, I don't know if you know, we probably know that you're the team that you were on with the dolphins was the last team to when the AFCEAS besides the Patriots. Like I think they said something about that when they were talking about the last team to go into New England and when. So I think I think I did. There's something about that. Well, I looked at that sad or something. He's crazy. That like eleven years now, Indian eleven years ago, like that's that's kind of that's kind of weird. And you're also selected as a pro bowl or that year. Well, what did that mean to you? That mean a lot. You know, any time your peers select you for an award, you know it means more, and so going through that, it was the greatest being to give, to get that honor and to be out there amongst you know, some of the best in your in your profession. Pretty Cool, you know, and it and it makes you want to go back because you see all these high level guys that you know play the game at a high level and you get to be a part of it. You know, that was that was pretty cool. And then after your career with the dolphins, you went to the Eagles and I know you played for San Diego for a couple years and you're at Houston. So what what was the rest of your career like? A you know, obviously my time going to billy was a lot different. You know, that my first time going through and experiencing free agency, so I did actually know what I was getting into. So I was just looking for an opportunity to go to the playoffs. Ended up going to Philadelphia, where I thought that we're going to be, you know, pretty good, but we have a pretty high chance of being in the playoffs because that was a very challenged football team. Unfortunately, didn't work out that way. So, you know, it was a learning experience and my role change drastically. You know, we had a running back, I think everybody knows, but Sheel McCoy, who was really good and talented. So you know, being behind him and then I just didn't, I don't think I hit this game up with, you know what, what type office they were running. So, you know, I had that year experience and then I went to San Diego play a little bit more third...

...down stuff behind right. That us and you just trying to expend my career and was just forcing it to still be in having that opportunity to be in nfal still. So, you know, I played, you know, ten years playing running back, you know, and I think that was you know, I was just appreciative of every moment and every season that I got to had the experience. They definitely beat the average, which I think it's like two to three years because of running there, right. So that was you know. So it was just, you know, me get opt to you to do, you know what I really enjoyed doing. Yeah, and I know we touched on it before, but what else are you doing now? Just Post Care? So outside of you know what I was saying, like, you know, working with all men, doing, you know, the radio and then the financial professional stuff, really just being a dad and the wholes band. Like you know that I really enjoyed the hit. The formerly thing is pretty cool full time John had the kids that it's probably the most rewarded thing I've ever done. And you know I have a little boy and a little barrel. Enjoy skinny time with them. My Wife, you know, she does it amazing job. So you know, that's about it outside of, you know, trying to be different type of professional. But now you know, during the bad thing and doing then thing. Yeah, would you let your son play football? Absolutely, like one. I couldn't tell him not to because, you know, I feel like I subjected him to being around you like even now we go to already go to the football games and then a lot of my buddies and then at the house there's a lot of Almur and stuff, and then we have, you know, NFL jerseys from guys that you know, I played with. So he's always around it and he just naturally seems that he's picked up on and he likes it. So we'll see what happens. He told baseball though, or another score. I definitely won't push him to play it, but you know, if he changes to then that's his choice. Hey, we know that the baseball money is different. You ready for some fun questions? Are you go from have versus savage. Okay, what's your favorite Song Right now? Man, I don't listen too much music. I listened to most of the old school stuff, so I've been kind of listening to Jay Zabda Ale. And what about who would be one, one player that you want to exchange your just with that you didn't I like to get it Dan Standers Jersey, or if it was somebody that played around the same time, I like Marchen Nets. All right, yeah, definitely. And then what? What NFL team do you root for now? I don't really have a team. I I mean I root for the dolphins when I see them, and then hometown campion. So I guess that's the two teams that I probably root for the most. And then if you didn't play football, what do you think you'd be doing if I had play? Yeah, I would have taken me. I probably would try to in baseball. All right. Do you play baseball in high school? Yeah, yeah, all right. Well, I appreciate you coming on. And could you want the followers know where they could follow you at? Follow me on twitter, Instagram, running twenty three Brown, you know business inquis, you know on linked in as well. So pretty much all to social media, but instagram and twitters, Rounnie twenty three Brown. There you go. Yeah, Linkedin is big now, I think with again, with athletes. Yeah, everybody's trying to forgout what to do next, but you know what kind of transition you want to make exactly. All right. Well, again, I appreciate it and we'll be in touch. Okay, say good.

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