Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 3 months ago

Sammy Arriaga | Average to Savage EP169

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the one hundred and sixty-ninth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring musician Sammy Arriaga. Paul Guarino talked with Sammy Arriaga discussing being a Cuban country singer, breaking into Web 3, and creating his first music NFT Metagirl.   

Follow Sammy Arriaga https://twitter.com/SammyArriaga 

This podcast interview with Sammy Arriaga was originally recorded on March 18, 2021

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Garno, everyone in anyone, athletes, swebs and much more. WHAT'S UP, everybody? Welcome back to another episode of the average savage podcast. Or special guest today is Sammy Oriaga. Sammy, how's it going? Chill and man, just hanging out with PG himself. Appreciate you coming on. I know we've been talking about this for pretty much months now at this point. So, yeah, I just wanted to get this started. Just tell me a little bit about a little bit about your background and how you got into music. Yeah, absolutely. So. A lot of people don't know this, but my whole family's from the island of Cuba. Spanish is actually my first language. Believe it or not. Grew up speaking Spanish for both my mom and my grandma. Was raised with too strong Hispanic women, but I would see my dad every other weekend and you know that the relationship was healthy there. But it was a lot of like back and forth between English and Spanish, so I was able to keep both. Language is strong, thankfully, you know, kind of it helped me out greatly in the long run for sure. But being raised in Miami, the culture was definitely all over the place because, as you know, Miami is a huge melting pot of all different cultures, you know, Latinos, Europeans, Americans, etc. But Yeah, man, I come from a Hispanic background. I do country music now, little bit of a people ask all the time why I do country if I'm Cuba and but we'll get to that. We'll get to that topic. Yeah, so, I mean that is my next question. So you grew up in Miami, in your Cuban how did you become a country artist? It's wild because, you know, my dad would always tell me that that I had a good voice. You know, growing up, he would hear me singing down the halls or singing in the shower or seeing it in the car, and he'd be like, have you ever thought about taking vocal lessons, you know, doing any of these TV shows like American idol, the voice, you know, x factor? And one day I was I was like, you know what, let's do it, let's just give it a shot, you know, let's see what happens. So I started doing all these TV shows and, you know, thankfully, in two thousand and twenty, one, two thousand and eleven, I made it all the way to Hollywood on on the believe it was like the tenth season of American idol. It was the year Scotty mccury and Lauren Alane. I don't know if you recall, but I auditioned in Hollywood for the judges. It was Jlo, Randy Jackson and Steven Tyler at the time. Didn't unfort unfortunately, didn't make it past Hollywood. But the genre that I ended up going with was country music, because on American idol there's been a lot of great success out of the country music genre. And so my dad is like, Hey, listen, you're Latino and country music is the biggest genre on American idol so far, you know,...

...based on like success after the show. Why don't you just give it a shot and be like the Latino Country Singer? And so that was my mentality going into these auditions and you know, although it didn't pen out the way we planned, I still fell in love with the genre. I still continued to studying the history of Country Music and fully immerse myself into the genre, learned the bunch of music, wrote my own songs, until one day I packed up my bags and moved to Nashville, and that was the start of my Nashville Journey. You know, I've been here now for twelve years doing the doing the bang thing, and discovered web three late last year and been doing nft music ever since. So pretty much teligunt country music. Yead know, every time I tell one of my friends about you and I saw him you're a Cuban country singer, they're always like wait, what? So, yeah, and that already, like you said, like that. I mean that gets a conversation started and just tell me about obviously I think people don't realize that like being a being an artist is pretty much be an entrepreneurs the same thing. So what does that journey been like for you? I know, like you said, you moved from my any Miami, to Nashville and you've been there for, you said, like ten years now. Yeah, I'm going on like the eleventh year, I believe. Yeah, yeah, so what is that journey just been like for you as an artist, creating songs and music and obviously pumping your own self and things like that? Yeah, it's definitely a fine line because, you know, at the end of the day we all just want to do art, we all just want to write song. Saying tour, you know, do the fun stuff, but you know, as time goes on, you know, especially the life of an independent artist. You know, we were we wear a lot of hats, and that's a that's at the plug for a PG hats. But yeah, we wear a lot of different hats. You know, I tell my friends all the time that I'm a I'm a marketing director, I am a social media manager, I am a songwriter, I'm a producer, I am theinematographer and do like so many things. But at the end of the day, I love it because I orchestrate my you know, my canvas I have. I paint my own canvass. You know what I'm saying. I'm orchestrating whatever the people are hearing and enjoying on a daily basis. So, if anything, that adds more authenticity to the art itself, knowing that you know the Fan, knowing that the artist had way more, you know, to do with the creation of the of the project, rather than having so many different people do it. You know what I mean. But there is no right or wrong way. That's just the way that I've decided to do it. I love to be very hands on with everything I do. You know, moving in Nashville, I learned that it's like touring is a beast of its own. It's very difficult to find the band, to stay organized, you know, to stay healthy most importantly. Yeah, music is is a lot harder than people think, but I'm very blessed to be, you know, given a gift from God, you know, to give back to the to the planet and, you know, even after all the years of of...

Roller coasters, you know, I still very much love what I do and you know, now with blockchain technology, like it's just reigniting me, like as if I just bought my first guitar and wrote my first song. So I'm just excited to see where it goes from here. Yeah, no, that's dope, and I like, I know, just like a lot of artists and things like that, just like and I just don't see them like putting in work like you put in. So that's why it's like just in general and be connected. And I was just like yeah, I like Sammy knows, like you, understands like business and you got to actually do stuff for yourself too, because some people just make music and think it's going to like blow up and do it magically. Yeah, like, Oh, yeah, this is let yeah, it's gonna it's gonna go out there. But yeah, it's been it's been dope just connecting with you in general. And Yeah, I know you signed with Sony Music or Sony Publishing One. When was that and what was that feeling like? It was awesome. I actually I'll tell you how that all happened. I actually had a writing camp and at the Gibson headquarters in betterly hills, which I believe it's not there anymore. I'm not very sure. I haven't been there in a while, but they were hosting a writing camp for Latin artists. Say. It was a Spanish driven camp. I was booked by BMI, which I was with at the time. It's a PR O company. They're in charge of like distributing royalties and whatnot, but they also facilitate like writing sessions and writing camps like that one. So I was very blessed to attend it and work with a bunch of other incredible artist and songwriters. And then at the end of the camp we did like a little showcase where everybody that was part of the writing camp would perform the songs, and so I was one of the selected from the from the camp to perform and in the audience was a manager. He goes, he runs his company called Laddiam Entertainment. He heard me and he's a Ky man. I really love what you do, I love your vision. I work predominantly with with Hispanic artist no matter what genre they do. I just like the fact that they come from a Latin descent and you, my friend, are Cuban and are very talented and I think you'd be a perfect fit for our company. So I was like, all right, let's give it a Stot, you know. So at the time I didn't have a manager, I didn't have a label or nothing, so I just said Yolo, you know I don't get anything fun going all, so let's try it. So, believe it or not, within the month of signing with the company, I got a publishing deal in two thousand and fifteen with Sony ATV out of New York City. They are actually the largest publishing company in the world, which could be a good or bad thing. Let's just leave it at that. And then a couple years, I believe a year or a year and a half later, I signed with Sony Music Nashville, which is the record label out of Nashville. So they're two different things. So any atvs for songwriting Sony Music is for a like as an artist, like...

...releasing music on the radio and stuff like that. But yeah, I mean that all went down like really quick, almost too quick, to the point that I wasn't able to actually establish like strong relationships and friendships with these people that I'm signing my life away too. And it was almost too fast because, you know, I would like share my vision and share my songs and you know, there wasn't an initial foundation there, you know what I mean, like they weren't fully invested. So they were all just very confused. It was very hard to make any like the executive decisions on releases, and then it just got really muddy. But thankfully always let go by the label in two thousand and seventeen and then right as soon as that happened, I've been releasing independently on spotify and apple music and tick tock and all that stuff ever since and you know, honestly, I'm just very thankful to even say this, is that I've seen most of my success post being released by Sony, just being independent and, you know, the Fan, knowing that what they're getting from me is from me, not from a company. So my experience, you know, it had to happen because it's part of the roller coaster. It's made me appreciate a lot of things and, you know, grow my rhinal skin in the music industry. You know what I'm slaying. So I'm thankful that it that it all happened. You know, I I'm still figuring out a few things when it comes to those deals. But you know, again, coming back to web three and you know, music kind of teased. I truly think that this is about to like reform the entire music industry and I'm just happy to be a part of it. Yeah, and then, what would you say was your big breaking like? What was it like to like one here, when your songs maybe like on the radio for the first time? I don't even know if that's like a thing now. It's like now. No, I'll tell you this. I've never, I've never had a breakthrough song on the radio. I've been don't I've been on digital radio, like satellite radio, I mean on serious ex M I've had a few songs of mine be broadcasting on those stations and it's been awesome, you know, like it's it was an awesome moment to be able to call my dad and be like we're on the radio. And you know, I've had another moment where my hometown station play one of my original songs as well, and that was an extremely humbly moment for me, you know, after years of listening to that radio station and working so hard to be on there. But I would say my biggest breakthrough was, I would say, Tick Tock. Believe it or not, I hate I hate that. That's that, you know, to bring up tick tock, but, like you know, they've done a lot of awesome things for my music career when it comes to posting bit me, posting videos and, you know, landing on the algorithm and my streams growing exponentially. You know, because everybody thinks of Tick Tock like the little kid ap where everybody dances, but you know,...

Bowle, you know, they under they underestimate the power of that APP. You know, it's a very powerful tool for any creator to have, and I started diving in and people all one twenty, which is it's almost been two years since I got a tick tock and honestly, man, it's as dumb as it sounds, it literally changed my music career. It was insane. I mean I've I've probably gained in the in the past two years about three million streams just from tick tock exposure. It's insane. I went from like having three thousand or four thousand spotify followers to not having thirty three thousand, which is very, very hard on spotify to gain followers. Like it's so hard. You even know you can follow people on spotify. But yeah, I mean tick talks change the game for me. INSTAGRAM reels has also changed the game for me. That you know they're stepping it up to you know, you got pinterest now doing the same thing with idea pins. I haven't really tapped into youtube. Believe it or not. I never really had a big breakthrough on Youtube. Never been a fan of long form videos of myself. Yeah, man, that's pretty much it. I would say streaming is like my my, you know, my breakthrough. And then, if we're talking about what's the most recent accomplishment, I would say, you know, the release of this metagirl music and Ivet. You know, it's my a bit. It's it's literally my biggest project I've that I think I've ever been a part of. I was about to say I think we're in your breakthrough right now. Exactly. Yeah, I guess. I think I feel like I feel like the whole like tick tock thing is like I think of the past now, you know, even though kids are still using it and you know, it's still pumping bags and it's still like, you know, changing people's lives left and right. I just I'm just in love with web three in the blockchain and you know what it's what it's about to do to the music industry. I'm just really excited to see what happens, you know for sure. And then, yeah, how did you get into NFTS, because I don't even know if I really know. You know, I got into it through a friend of mine in Miami. He has PfP on instagram. Was A cryptomory. For those of you who don't know, it's a Cryptomoris, is a it's an nft collection and other one that's doing really, really, really well. My buddy happened to be a collector of a cryptomory and it was just PfP and I was like, dude, that's doll. What is that like? Is that a cartoon and he's like, well, yeah, it's an animation, but it's it's a collection in web three called the CRYPTOMORI's. Have you ever bought an NFT before? And I was like, I don't know what that is like. I'm down to grab coffee and just talk, talk, talk it through, and he gave me this feel the one hundred and one, and I loved it. I thought it was dope. You know, I've always been a fan of animation and art, so I was like, screw it, you know, I got some money line around, you know, it's it only it made sense to me.

So started I started diving into these projects, you know, into these communities, by acquiring some of these awesome pieces of art, some of them being the cryptomor is, the humanoids, the apocalyptic apes and a few other ones as well. And you know, I didn't come in with the idea of promoting music. I came in with the idea of just learning what NFT's are and being part of these awesome communities. And for the past three four months that's just kind of been my mentality of just off of organically growing my fant my supporters and my fans by not necessarily having a project you know, just being part of another community and meeting people and just being genuine and just being friendly with one another. So then that led to the creation of my music, nft. You know, coming out of the blue and being able to say, Hey, guys, believe it or not, I just dropped my first music, nft. I would love for you guys to check it out. It was almost like a stealth drop and everybody's a Yo, like, that's crazy, I didn't even know you had a project. I'm there, you know. So that's kind of how I landed or en tease. Man, it was just like throw a best friend from back home and now we're like who're in it the entire day, like to the second I wake up to the second I go to bed. So it's definitely been a crazy journey. Me and you obviously met on twitter spaces and Waked up and it's pretty funny, just like all the stuff that's happened. Me and you're just texting like you know, you see this, you see that, you see this. Yeah, it's been a while, always on going. Yeah, it's definitely Dope and interesting and new and obviously exciting to see what goes on in the future and obviously I don't know how many artists are in the NFT space, like music wise, but I'm I'm assuming you got to be like at least like the first like, I don't even know, fifty, maybe something. They got to be super slim, right, all right, yeah, it's extremely slim, you know, and I feel it's because, you know, people are still figuring out the legality and just like the you know, the way to, the way to go about it. You know, there's a lot of things that go on behind the scenes when it comes to the usage of music and copyright and Publishing and master ownership and, you know, songwriter splits and there's just so much that goes into it, you know. But the way that I approached Meta girl is, you know, I work pretty regularly with my producer. You know, we were pretty you know, we have a really cool little thing going on, you where I'll just like write an idea and I'll send it in and you'll produce something up within like the day that I sent it to him. We just have a really good momentum going on and so, you know, I told them that I'm like Yo, like I'm getting into ENMT's. I love the whole eye of it. How should we go about it? And he's like, look, the more writers we get involved, the more companies are get involved, the more their producers and other people we get involved, it's going to be harder.

So why don't we just produce something and write something just you and I, you know, my me and my producer, and then just release that and just test the waters and see what happens. So Meta girls literally just a product of me and my producer and, you know, a few teammates that helped along the way with a mastering and engineering and all that stuff, you know, to kind of Polish up the track. But aside from that, you know, it's pretty much a handshake deal you and just being very, very true and honest with your collaborators and and the result was a success. You know what I'm saying. So you know now I'm very blessed to say that my producer has probably made more on this one and a tea drop and he's made in the last ten like maybe two years, with some of the other independent music drops he's done. You know what I'm saying. So I mean the math, that the math could be different. I'm just, you know, talking, talking, randomly. Here. But but, yeah, I mean it's putting it's putting the ownership back into the Creator's hands and it's allowing the it's allowing the Creator and the and the the musician, the artist, to be compensated for their craft in in such a much, in a much better way than wet to has, for sure, you know, definitely, and I think for those people that don't know, you guys get like a small percentage of of royalties for streaming and all that, because I even even actually when I had Nellie on, he had no idea how much. He had no idea how much, like per streamer, how much he was making up stream. Yeah, it's pretty that was pretty interesting, especially like you know, annwn, big huge artist like that. He didn't he didn't know where the how, how the streaming works or the revenue. Yeah, man, it's insane. I mean that. I I'll tell you this, like I'll kind of give it to you right now. I mean on Amazon music it takes two hundred and fifty streams to make a dollar. That's crazy. Now a apple music a hundred and twenty eight, title Seventy Eight, Napster fifty three, deezer a hundred and fifty six, Pandora seven hundred and fifty two, Youtube Music One thousanwo hundred and fifty, spotify three D and fifteen. That's crazy. It takes three hundred and fifteen streams to make a dollar on spotify. Yeah, that's wild. And another thing that people don't know is that the if somebody does doesn't listen to a song until the thirty second mark, the song won't monetize. Yeah, so they have to listen to this song up to thirty seconds to then qualify for that one stream. Yeah, not, I mean the other. I mean I feel like that makes sense. Insane, because most people just like hit next, next,...

...next, next, next, you know. All right. So, pivoting back to to Meva MEDA girl, what was that process like when you were writing it and how did you for those that don't know, it's like really dope. If you don't know web three, you probably might not know the terminology. So that's why I think it's also dope too, because it's almost like it's almost like a secret coat, like it's almost like a secret society type thing. You have to you have to know. If you know, you know. Yeah, absolutely, I mean it was a kind of a struggle at first, but because, you know, there's a lot of words that I wasn't very familiar with with being in, you know, twitter spaces, which is kind of like the reimagination of clubhouse, but be it's twitter, I pretty much was able to pick up on a few words here and there. And you know, I like to write songs from a Guitar Lick, a melody and then I insert the words into the melody. So then I start finding these cool words, these web three related terms, and just start inserting them in melodies and then I kind of expand out. You know, I would, of course, like there's a lot of words that just don't sound cool in a song, so I would just completely ignore them. But you know, and then there's times where I'll take a word and I'll just kind of warp it so it could get actually sound cool in a song. But the ultimate goal was to write a song for the web three audience that I was surrounding myself with on a daily basis, you know, singing back to them the words that they use in a daily basis, you know, just a field that they're they're familiar with, knowing that that would open up their heart because I was singing back to them something that they connect with, and so I feel like that's the true reasoning why metal girl has done what it's what it's done is because medical girl was born from the community, you know what I mean, like they they fueled the idea from met a girl. They they planted that seat of inspiration in my mind to even write a Webpary love song. So then I went out on my way and said, all right, you guys want to you guys want to Web threy Song, will here it is. And so I was just blessed that that was the metal girl was the song that, you know, God put in my head in that very moment. And you know, now here we are, so in the song is fire. If you guys don't know, it's exclusively on the block train now right. Yes, sir, yeah, it was on. It was on wet you for us, but I took it down as a form of respect for the NFT purchaser, you know what I mean, like I wouldn't want anybody to be like, why would I go and buy an nft when I could just go to web too and listen to it? So what I did I cut that off. That's not an option anymore. So now the only way to hear it is on the blockchain and, you know, from the luxury of your wallet once you buy the NFT. Yeah, I'm sure, and I know you got some other songs coming up...

...and you got pixelated. I know everyone's way in a for that release. So what is that process been like writting that? And I know you're making nft use for that one too. Write. Yeah, yeah, that's going to be the next music nft that we're doing. It's going to be the follow up to Meta girl. We got some really cool ideas of our sleeves for that one as well. Of course, the art is going to be Pixel Art. That mean, based on the title, we're thinking about, you know, making it a genet generative PfP collection as well, so that people can start rocking those pfps on twitter, you know, with the pfpfp culture being so hot right now, you know, we wanted to kind of take advantage of that as well. But yeah, I mean we wrote the song. I wrote the song here in Nashville with a few friends of mine, with again Webb three in mind, and you know, I had had a note in my phone with some some words and some phrases that I think would sound cool in a song, you know, Bait like that. I heard in some twitter spaces and just put a melody to it and pixelated was born. I've been singing it in twitter spaces the same way I did with Meta girl, and it seems to be organically growing the same way, the same way that Meta did, and so I'm just really stoked to finally get get finished that one. In the studio. We've cut bogals the other day and I'm just waiting for the production to be to be done with that. And and yeah, I mean that one should be hot and ready to go an N FT. I'd say middle to late April, maybe early May. My birthday is the first week of May. So ideally it would be dope to do it that week, because then people feel are gonna have to buy it. It gets it's my birthday. Yo. That's exactly I was just thinking, because my designer been late in my birthday is April, and I was like yeah, I'm about to just release an April and on my birthday. Yeah, exactly. There a goat you want? You want to give us a little preview of pixelated? Yes, absolutely so. This this song, pixelated is pretty much about digital love and physical love are both love. You know, if whatever you feel, that's you know, you're totally entitled to that. So love comes into many different shapes and sizes and forms and even in pixels. So this is a this is pixelated. Three two. We leaving me. We never coming back down to the we were in game. I giving lass life. No looking away. You one who want easy. It's take a spin on the bat. Chang, Fareb, move plain...

...and take it to neon doom. May. Three two, relief in the universe. We never come back down to there's no way that we could think it. Even when it's picks and maybe it so what it's sucherality, but that change would it do to me? I feel in love and making even when it's picks. Later, babies, pitchy face, I've gone wow, always put you on display when I'm hanging around. Some did it a crowd. Let's take a spin around the black change, show my we made. Oh, put me in in a brand new place. Yeah, three two, relief in the universe. We never come back down to the there's no way that we thank it. Even when it's picks, mate, it still such reality. That will never change what to do to me, have the feeling of making, even when it's peaks. Yay, yeah, Yay, Yay. I A feeling of making, even when it picks me. Yeah. So there we go. We just made history. That was the first full song live on average of savage Sam made history and he makes it, he's making. That's grow. So it's lit all right. I appreciate that. A couple more and then we'll wrap things up. What are your future goals this year? Future goals to focus more on my mental health and focus more on balance in life. I feel like I overwork myself and I don't know when to when to just draw the line and, you know, take a step back from what I'm passionate from. I get very excited about things, you know, especially like something like the block and web three. You know, it's a brand new things, so it's very easy to find up with something and not let it go. You know, we get very caught up in all this stuff and, as I'm sure you know, Paul, like we spend hours on end on these spaces and, you know, we've just feel that Foamo, you know, and it's a real thing and we just got to learn when to take a step back and meditate, drink water,...

...exercise and focus on our body, because without our bodies, none of this would be possible. Right. So that's honestly my biggest future goal. And then, you know, another future role of mine is to really hone in on the power of community, because I've never had one like the one I have now. So I want to do everything in my power to strengthen that and, you know, not make it where it's just like here's my music, okay by you know, I feel like that's what that's what web too felt like to me. I never got a chance to, you know, make it a village. You know, it was just a bunch of listeners, but it's not a village. So my goal is to turn my community into a village of people that I could actually count on and rely on when I whenever I do anything in my in my music career, and just embrace them, you know what I mean, because again, without them I would be nothing, I would be irrelevant. So it goes both ways. So yeah, mental health, physical health, power of community. Yeah, yeah, even on the weekends now, I just been like yead off twitter spaces sometimes just chill out for a second exactly. And then what advice would you give to a young artist? Well, that's a at the broad question. I would say do everything like be prepared to get the nose and be grateful for them, because every time you get a know, your rhino skin gets stronger. You know what I'm saying? You tend you tend to appreciate the winds more when there's more nose behind. I mean, I'm sure you've heard this a million times, but you know, wasn't Michael Jordan not accepted into the High School Basketball Team? Yeah, there you go, like you know stuff like that, you know, saying like Disney, while Disney, like he pitched his idea of Mickey mouse to tons of publishers and nobody believed them. You know. So it's just it's about appreciating the the failures to you know, because they're only going to allow you to appreciate the the the accomplishments in the wins even more. And Show Up. You know, that's like one of the biggest things they tell me. You know, they told me when I first got to Nashvilla's show up like just, you know, try to pull up to every event, every performance, every meeting. Don't be late, you know, always be always ask questions and, you know, persistence always is persisted. That persistence is key, and the squeaky wheel always wins the grease, you know. So it's about the constantly hidden it and not giving up, you know, and just be relentless, you know, be you got to keep that perseverance high because, you know, along...

...the way, for example, like I was, I was known to be very persistent when I first got to Nashville, and a lot of people didn't like that, but it only made me more aware of the people that believed in what I was doing. So they did me a favorite of showing me that they were annoyed by my persistence. So I cut them out. I'm like, okay, you don't buy with what I'm doing, so next, you know. So it's about it's about learning how to cut out all the people that are going to slow you down, staying persistent and, you know, keep your circles tight and just stay close to those who believe in you. Pretty much so and embrace them. Good. Definitely, I think that's what I think, that's what fuels me, just all the rejection that I had. So just, yeah, prove people a wrong pretty much type, think. But yes, last last couple. One's phone questions, some speed ones. Who's your favorite singer? Michael Bo bleat? All right, wasn't expecting that. Yeah, what's your favorite Song Right now, besides your own? Anything us? All right, I like that. You already known big Rus Guy. What's your what's your favorite food? Who? I love, anything related to meat balls. All right. Yeah, like, I love a good like spec Italian dish. All right. Well, I got you very good I lat yeah, one, I got you a pizza too, but you know, last one. What I is something people don't know about you. They don't know that I used to be a Pokemon and Yu Gi oh enthusiasts. I used to do protest and go to tournaments and compete and collect. Yeah, I was die hard. I mean I would literally go, I would run up and down the block looking for kids to beat in card duels. Imagine you making a song for Pokemon and FT's so all I'm going to say. We're meant, we're manifesting it, all right, Sammy. Well, I appreciate you coming on, and now I can you get the listeners know where they can follow you at you guys can follow me on twitter. Just Sammy are Riaga. I am on the streaming platform still, although, moving forward, I'm only releasing music on the blockchain. You can still hear some of my past releases on spotify. Just Search Sammy Ariaga. And the same thing goes for all the other platforms, instagram, facebook, Tick Tock and Youtube. But yeah, mainly on twitter and I'm always hanging out there and twitter spaces, so come say hello and that's be friends.

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