Average to Savage
Average to Savage

Episode · 3 years ago

Zack Weiner | Average to Savage EP48

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This is the forty-eighth episode of the Average to Savage podcast featuring entrepreneur and founder of Overtime Zack Weiner. Paul Guarino talked with Zack Weiner discussing his time at UPenn, how Overtime came about, and what the future holds for Overtime. Follow Zack Weiner https://www.instagram.com/overtimezack/ https://www.instagram.com/overtime/ Interview with the founder of Overtime Zack Weiner

This is the average to savage podcast with Paul Garno, everyone in anyone, athletes, swebs and much more. It's up everybody. I'm back for another episode of Irish Savage podcast. Our special guests today is co founder and president of overtime, Zac Zak. How's it going? Good, good, appreciate you coming on. Yeah, thank for me. So let's just jump right into it. Could you give me a little brief background about yourself? Yeah, for sure. I'm currently getting in my office in New York City and I was born in our eightier in York City as well. That the first eighteen years of my life here throughout the big sports fans played a bunch of sports and then I went to pen down Philadelphia. Went there for four years. While I was there I did sports radio. That's really how I sort of got my start in the world of sports media. And then while I was there I started a website called the courts potion I ran that for actually five years and then when I graduated I was still running it, but I moved back to New York City and then a couple of years later I started overtime, which is what I'm doing right now. Got Got you already answered. My first question is going to say what were your past experiences and I wanted you to talk about the sports quotion. So you already did that. But what was your idea for it back then? I know you had it was almost like like the facebook for writeing or for sports writing. Yeah, I mean the idea was, you know, I was a kid of pen that loved for it. By wasn't super enthusiastic about the college teams. Actually, it's funny I say that now because I made plans tomorrow to watch the quakers in the final four of Ivy League tournaments. Care at all, but I really wanted to talk about my favorite team from New York, which were the the nick, the Yankees, a jet, the Rangers, you know, and I felt almost like a display sports fan. So I just find I was start, you know, basically a sports blog talking what I thought was kind of smart talk about my favorite team, and then it kind of dumble me, like hey, maybe there's some other smart college kids that can write really well, or could you podcast or video? And they also sort...

...of feel similarly, and they probably are really smart people too, because they go a really good universities and probably going to go on to do finance or law or some more boring thing, but for now they still are big worth fans and maybe they have some time on their hands to do this stuff. So I were pretty some of my best friend just to join the say, and write and editing stuff like that, you know, and then work sort of got around. In a year later we had almost a hundred writers from fifty plus universities, and then a year after that we doubled in size. So the hypothesis turned out to be pretty much right. And Yeah, it give it a really fun community to be a part of, it a really fun size to run. Got It now. I know after you graduated you had some a couple different jobs and then. So what made you want to go back and like run your own company? Yeah, for sure. So what happened basically was I graduated and I was working on the sports quotion, but it wasn't really nothing to pay to build, so I was working on wall streets the same time, and then I got approached by my current co founders, name the Dan's order was the head of digital at wme, now known as endeavor, and you know, he wanted to start something in sports faith while there, and he sort of saw what ition and I knew about his previous successes with startups. You so we sort of teamed up and I joined me to launch what would end up be coming over time. We didn't really know, who's the beginning, what it would be. You know, exciting for me to have sort of a different level of resources than what I had have was forcetion and Dan and I really aligned on our vision for what this could become. You know, as soon as we started working on it, it was very exciting. This is really the first time in my life I was able to fully, fully dedicate myself to my own project, sports book, and I was always in college or at another full time job. So it's very liberating for to become a full time focus for me. Definitely now, while you're at the full time job. was there son that's sparked in you? Were like, I wanted to like work for myself. I think I sort of knew all along there's a good chance I would end up...

...there. I was just waiting for the right opportunity to strike. I mean, you know, when you're twenty two year old kids that just came out of college, you don't have any sort of built up wealth or anything like that. Is Pretty risky to sort of just go on your own without any sort of sack off plan. So when I was a bard of this opportunity to join wo me, but this sort of start working on will become overtime. You know, even just from like thinking about it from a risk profile perspective, it was really great how they got sort of minimize my risk while still optimizing my upside and offo my happiness. Definitely. Definitely. And could you give people that don't know what overtime is? Can you explain it to us? Yeah, of course. So over time as the sports network for the next generation of fans. So you know, if you look at all the numbers, the next generation of fans called that, you know, on thirteen to thirty year olds and sort of wider spectrum. They're not watching as much live or they're not watching as much of the legacy media companies, but they still love sports and they just want to go do it in different places and different ways with different talent and sometimes different athletes, and so that was really the decist when we started overtime. And so so we started it, as you know, video only company. We realize that you know, young people want to watch sports content. They don't want to read as much and you know. So we cover for different sports. We cover basketball, soccer, football and esports. We do hundreds of millions of minutes of watch time every single month. We reach about something like thirty million kids every single month. We create content for Instagram, for Snapchat, for Kick Tock, for Youtube, for twitter or facebook, basically wherever kids are. That's where we want to be and we've had we've had a good amount of success. Are engage a race on those platforms or industry high they start to work with a bunch of different brands to help modestize back contact that we have a driving commerce business or we spell shirts and hoodies and asshole stuff like that. You know, we've we've run a couple of live events. are going to start to do more. Yeah, so it's been a really, really fun process and I'm going to see where it goes. Yeah, that's I've been seeing a...

...rapidly grow over the past few years. So how did you come up with the name overtime or like why did you pick that? Yeah, it's funny when you choose the name for something like a question. As soon as we ended on that name, I would like this feels great, like sq, raise your sq, like we're making sports fans smart. That's surprise that it hadn't been taken. And then when we came up with the name over time, honestly, like I wasn't convinced that it was so much better than all the other names or that it really felt right. I was like, okay, well, this sort of works, and really that the premise was like well, we want to cover the games, we want to cover what happens after begain, doing that sort of like overtime, like what happens after regulation, so to because we feel really talk about it in that literal way. But that's sort of where the name team from. And it's funny because now, like you know, it's funny you ask that, because people don't even really ask about anywhere. It's just sounds right. I think the most people it's like, oh, yeah, overtime, like that's we you guys are. And if you think about any I mean, but before espn became hug just like what espn like or better, and like what is that? So I think at a certain point it's just, you know, as long as the name like has a ring to it. In some ways it's sort of as just end up working toole like Oh yeah, overtime, like they they're not thinking, oh, it's called overtime. Is just is overtime? Yeah, definitely. And was there any close finalists to the naming? Yeah, I'm trying to remember. We considered I wouldn't say violent, and I would say at the end of the day, over time definitely stood out among their e but any weekly brain from through a ton of it. One of the one that oped to my sideline one, you know, popromind rally, and it's so funny because like at the time you know you can make garments. Then Oh, sideline, like you know we're right there on the sideline, although and you can make stop the gate. It like no, we want to get by the K in the game. And then rally was like okay, we're all about the fan and rolling around players and stuff like that. But like now I think about it and it's like, did you have a cool company called rally, like you said, even possible? So it's as funny how these sort of things work out sometimes. Yeah, definitely, and...

...it was original plan. I remember you guys had had the APP and it was mainly high school basketball, correct. Yeah. So, yeah, we sort of come through the evolution. So, yeah, I would say that in the beginning it was very APP focused and it was very high big school basketball focus. And in terms of the APP, we actually have gotten rid of the APP because we've just realized that the social platforms are so good and that's what they're meant for. They're meant for viewing this content. There's billions of users on them and instead we've leveraged our technology for content capture. So, and this relates high school basketball. So so we're still probably the biggest in high school basketball, but we never really set out to become a high school basketball company. We use this sort of as an entry point into the hearts and live of young people and sort of ones. We did that and we're okay now the good fan as a football and soccer and professional basketball and college basketball. So we're not really limited by sport or by sort of age. We are passionate about sort of the next generation of basketball stars, but we're also passionate about the next areation of soccer and football and esports bars. And the reason why we sort of transfer the technology as well is because when you think about high school basketball and next generation of start, is very hard to capture video content of them and it's never really been done in real time. It's like either like once the year their game is on, you know, local television or if piano they're really good or whatever it is. But other than that, the only way to really do the Games has been like, you know, a coaching tool or something that, you know, the footage is available a couple days later. And we built the technology where basically we send a kids to a game, he holds up in his phone and then real time he can send highlights for our server. So last year when Zion was making those crazy dunk in high school, you know, two seconds after each songs, we could have it on social media and that sort of brought an excitement to the state that I think has never really been there before. Yeah, definitely, and I know. Yeah, it was like you said, you, you guys expanded. Now you have like original content to like interviews and stuff like that in the esports and life. That over time. So what we're brought you to like create all that. I know,...

...like the esports things getting like huge and I just was still one of your other inter reason. I've heard that you made the fort night team in like a week. Yeah, I mean ultimately, you know, we're trying to build a sports now work for the next generation and we need kids all over the world to love over time and to view it, you know, space where they watch sports content. And to be honest, you can't really do that just off a fifteen second question. Like you can totally start to build some community and some brand building and it's a very economically efficient way to do it and it's a very fun way to do it. But you know, if you want to be a sports network yet you know, kids just can't be watching your fifteen seconds. Eventually you want them to be watching hours of overtime content a day and obviously contented expensive. So we don't produce hours content every single day, but eventually we will, and so it's a process. But we already have I think fifteen diories on youtube, three on snapchat. We program on I think, I don't know, Putt like ten different instagram channels. We create different content for tick tock and a good for twitter, and so it's about really being Holi Dick in our approach and creating contented sort of all different levels. Yeah, definitely. And I just saw you recently acquired Si hoops network and you switch it to the women's basketball page. So what impact you think I will have on the company? And I think I think it's really important. I mean I would think both from a business case and they I don't want to think moral case, but I would think in a personal case they get it's very important that we cover women's sports as well. I think it's more popular than ever and we only have amazing stories and they're also amazing on the court, or so you know. To be able to hire chloe and work with hard and growing out that channel is, I I think I'll be really exciting. Definitely pretty much a no brainer. Huh. Yeah, totally. And and I saw your going global to and I saw you had a French page in a page for India to write. Yeah, I mean the international opportunity is huge. I mean my cofounder was in brand a couple weeks ago. You're very an overcome, sure, and people are stopping him and you know everyone across the world, but it doesn't put...

...it different. Not everyone across well, but there are people and kids across the world that look the overtime brand. So for us to be able to bring it to their country and show them stars in their own country and leverage our technology, you can do that. I think it's something really unique than really impactful. It definitely why did you pick France and India? You know, just sort of doing some research, we saw that is really exploding in those two countries. We all be on Canada. So I think between those three you get a really good you get three different, very different markets. Yeah, and you get some language barriers, some non language barriers, but it's great for our experimentation. There's also good upandcoming players in those countries. India obviously probably, other than China, the biggest market opportunity, so that's important. And then we know we found good people. They're the sort of helped launch it to gots. Are you. Are you planning on doing one for China too? You know, not, not in the next couple weeks anything like that, but they down the line. It's there's a definite possibility for sure. And I saw last year Kevin Durant invested in the company. So what kind of impacted that have? I mean, it's been great, Kevin, and it's a partner bridge. They've been helpful. We've done a couple of video series with them. Obviously, just learning their namecast is big credibility. They open up doors, so it's exciting to work with Kevin. Yeah, definitely, and I mean we kind of already touched on it, but how has overtime change since you found to get in two thousand and sixteen? Yeah, I mean it's it's crazy. It just feels so, so different. I mean, for one, I walk around or office and, you know, we were five people back then and now we're seventy. So it's, you know, the size and the scale in terms of employees, in terms of our audience, in terms of the content that we're producing. It's just obviously massively different. And you know the way. I mean now obviously tassins that, but also affecting my personal life. Like you know, to be honest, it's very cool to, you know, be able to walk down the street and it overtime chart and for kids to freak out or to be at a networking event or a party or whatever it is you're like,...

Oh yeah, you're the guy that found it overtime, and it's very flattering and it's you know, it's a very nice dealing. So I'm very grateful by all this, the fact that we've had, and it's not just me, it's my cold founders, our entire team, and of course there's a lot of luck. There's timing, there's all the support and mentorship that I've received, that we've all received. So it's definitely a lot that goes into it. Yeah, definitely. When I was in my research I didn't realize it's only been like two years since you guys launched. Yeah, it's kind of wild. Yeah, and what's our goals for two thousand and nineteen and beyond? And I when I also was listening to the interview, I heard you guys want to create your own leak. Yeah, we're talking a lot of the things that your nationals used. I mentioned, but live events is going to become bigger for us and I think that live of them could eventually turn into a league. I think if you look at most me that have been started, some of them successful, some of them not, the things that can really help both through league are built in audience and storytelling and if you have those things, the league not to sort of like a drop in the pond where no one's were knows about. If you have millions and millions of people already following me, which we do, and you have the capability to tell narratives around that league and around teams and around the players, that really differentiating and I think kind of give you an unfair advantage when you think about starting league. So that's definitely our future. Commerce. Increase our efforts there. It's going to be huge. We have some collaborations that we're going to announce. You know, increasing our scuw and they just always thinking about how we can continue to support our fans. You know, whether that's better and more content. Area is getting more into to work with NBA players, going weight deeper into esports. And then, you know, I want to make more money this year. Two, I want to be working with more brands. I think the brands that have taken a leap of faith for we're with us have seen an amazing return on their investment. So I want to continue working with partners that are excited to work with this is definitely and what advice would you give to inspiring entrepreneurs? Yeah, I would say, like I was in the biggest hurdle that firing entrepreneurs. We have and I...

...have this problem too, is like just getting started. Like I think the type of people that are entrepreneurs often or like perfectionists, like they're just get really ambitious people, and those can sometimes be at odd. Like if you want to do something perfectly, you're never going to get started because the first step you take might be around that, and that's okay. Like I think you have to get comfortable with making mistakes and sort of just in test terms, putting on MBP, putting up minimum viable products, like you gotta put some stuff out, tested out, see you like it if there's a market for it. I can't emphasize and not like how often you keep people putting in a way too much after before they either launch anything or put something out into the world to see if they're actual interest, because the bottom eizes you're not going to know. She try. Yeah, definitely just got to put it out there exactly. All Right, ready for some fun questions? Yeah, all right. Who Do you think's going to be the next Big High School Basketball Star? Like next is on next will mellow. Great questions. I'll say I mean the cheating answers Broughie Games, because he's technically that in high school, so he counts, but he's already mega. But I'll stay a money be all right. What about what do you enjoy watching more college basketball or Unbas to one, I say growing up and day by far now, if college, asprill has like a player that we've covered for a long time or some of the company and a relationship with, I would say it's tied. But I mean, man, I love what I mean, like I was watching the warriors rocket game and I mean I love the NBA. So it's difficult. Gotcha. Yeah, it's definitely cool seeing somebody that you follow from high school to college and then you see him in the NBA. Yeah, exactly, like I mean, honestly, I love watching because trayons like my guy and I sort of believed in him when he was in high school and come intuition. So that's been cool. Definitely. Definitely. And could you name three basketball jerseys that you would want that you don't own? Well, I like that one. Okay, I'll say a trey young Norman...

High School Jerosey, I think that would be dope. Okay, I would say, you know, when I was a kid, I had this like you know, when you're like a teenager like you want to be a contrarian. So I was a shooting nick fan growing up and I remember like Reggie Miller was just like that. You know, it's not a bully to the neck, but he's sort of pressed us. But for some reason when I was in high school I was a set with getting a reggume Miller Jersey, like I just thought like irony and owning one would be fun. So make my younger kids happy, I'll stay a Reggie Miller Jersey. And then I'm trying to think of just like a Fire Jersey. I don't know. When I was younger I used to do the out English jerseys all around, like with the old Denver Nugget logo and colors. Yeah, that was pretty cool. Or I don't know, maybe an Old John Stock in Jazz Jersey like those just look so cool. Yeah, definitely I like the I like the first one where you said Trey Young's High School Jersey. Yeah, that would be said. I had had someone else say a Barack Obama High School Jersey down was pretty cool. And last one. What do you like to do in your free time? I like my friends. I've been, you know, as an entrepreneury you don't have a lot of time. Like there's definitely a truth to that, but you know, and so honestly, there's a lot of people that I don't get to be as much as I would like, but when I do have time thing of my friends, I make sure that it's like really the people that I really care about. It hold true and deear. So I been time a friend. I play a lot of basketball, thanks physically active as a huge part of being successful and keeping your brains part and then when I kind of try to play chat, I paid a lot of chuffs growing up. So turn out mostly online, but I hope to get back in pins tournaments to the well, yeah, well, I appreciate you coming on. And where could people find you? And overtime at? Yeah, for sure. So whatever platform you're on, overtime is there, whether that's like a newer platform like tick tock or one of the older ones like facebook or instagram or youtube. So that's freaking were basically at over time everywhere. And then personally, you can probably on instagram at overtime.

Once again, appreciate you coming up. Yeah, I.

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